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LABOUR IN PARLIAMENT.

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LABOUR IN PARLIA- MENT. I THE NEW SESSION. MR MACDONALD ON THE POSITION Parliament reassembled for the new session on Tuesday, and on Monday Mr J. Ramsay Macdonald, M.P., leader of the Labour members at St. Stephens ac- corded an interview to a representative of the "Daily Citizen," in the course of which he made reference to the many great issues facing the Legislature dur- ing the coming months. "The session," said Mr. Macdonald, "is going to be one of the landmarks of modern political history. First of all, we have to face one of the most critical of Imperial problems, that of how far a self-governing dominion fly- ing the British flag is to be expected to conform its actions to British con- stitutional practice, and how far the Imperial Parliament is to accept the responsibility of passing opinions on such a matter. Since I returned from Glasgow I have seen some of the great- est authorities on constitutional law and I have found none who did not look upon the action of the South African Government with grave con- cern. The clause in the Indemnity Bill dealing with the deportations carries us back to the time when the country was on the verge of revolution—the time of Charles the First—and so ob- noxious to all British instincts have such legislative acts been that they are specifically prohibited in the Constitu- tion of the United States. CIVIL FREEDOM. I "In this fight the party is not going to champion Labour merely but con- stitutionalism. I am bound to confess that it is to me a great regret that it is the South African Government which we have to challenge in this instance. We owe General Botha and his friends many debts of forbearance and gener- osity. I hope the discussion will be carried on in such a way as to con- vince the self-governing dominions that there is no intention on the part of any member of the House of Com- mons to question their full rights of self-government, and I believe that the members of the South African Govern- ment will be candid enough to admit that their action is of such a nature as to compel the Imperial Parliament to consider it. "I suppose some 'genius' will put down a blocking motion, but I know what to do in that event. Whoever is elected chairman on Monday will not be left in the lurch. NAVAL SQUANDERING. I "Then we have the question of ar- maments to consider. This will divide itself into two sections, first of all that of sheer extravagance and reckless waste of public money. "Unfortunately, the House of Com- mons will not be put into possession of many facts regarding this because it is so buried in the general expenditure of the Admiralty, but all I have met who know the workings of the Admiral- ty simply smile when I talk about ex- travagance and waste. They all have little tales to tell. I wish Sir Francis Hopwood, who was made an extra lord to look after the business side of things, would tell us candidly what he thinks of it. This side of Admiralty adminis- tration is almost as objectionable as its big programmes and inflated fleets. All this arises because the Admiralty knows quite well that if it talks 'nervy- flap- doodle about foreign navies and menace nobody will sit down and ask it to ac- count for the enormous sums which are devoted to it year by year. "The second part of our criticism re- lates to the size of fleets. I know that that hinges upon foreign policy. If we continue to assert our intention of cap- turing private property at sea in time of war, and if the foreign affairs of the Empire are conducted in padded rooms, and behind closed doors, with blinds drawn and shutters closed, so that no light can get in and no whisper get out, big fleets are inevitable. "But, again, the programme which I believe is to be presented to us is altogether extravagant and unneces- sary. More thousands of men are to be diverted into the production of ar- maments, and the problem of national distribution of labour is to be ren- dered still more complicated in conse- quence. If we go on much longer the whole"* of our industry will be dominated, Uv T form of prodirisSSh which everybody condemns and. which nobody can do more than apologist* for. ?N- o t onl y Not' only^is foreign policy conducted secretly but all the officials who are responsible for it are drawn from das- ses which are out of touch with demo- cratic feeling, and act upon sentiments which have little influence on the open political life of the nation. They are drawn from our 'classy' political back waters, stagnant and stinking. We are, therefore, not merely fighting naval estimates but the whole system of dip- lomacy of which they are a comple- ment. I um1 SCANDAL OF DUBLIN. I i 1 • i men questions like that of Dublin have to be considered. The position of affairs in Dublin again is not that of a Labour dispute. It involves the character of the Government and the conduct of the municipality, and re- veals a state of administration which is (Continued at bottom of next columik.)

IIN MEMORY OF MINER HEROES.…

YSTRADGYNLAIS COUNCIL. Ii

PREMIER and SURFACE WORKER.

SENGHENYDD SENSATAION.

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LABOUR IN PARLIAMENT.