Hide Articles List

13 articles on this Page

Advertising

Advertising

THE MORAL of SOUTH AFRICA

30 A WEEK MINIMUM.

D. A.

THE SENGHENYDD INQUIRY.

News
Cite
Share

THE SENGHENYDD INQUIRY. Interesting Points in Evidence. SOME AMUSIXG PASSAGES The Home Office inquiry into the cause of the Semghenydd explosion was con- tinued at Cardiff, on Friday last, by Professor R. A. Redanayne, Ii.il. chief inspector of mines, who is accompanied by Ifr Evan Williams (chairman of the South Wales and Monmouthshire Coal- owners' Association) and Mr Robert Smillie (president of the Miners' Federa- tion of Great Brita.in) as assessors, and also by Mr H. K. Beale, Birmingham, solicitor to the- Commission. SAND AND WATER TO OBVIATE DANGERS. The examination of David Morris, j under-manager of the west side, was re- sumed by Mr Clement Edwards, M.P. (representing a. number of bereaved families). Mr Edwards, questioning th-e witness regarding the cavities in which gas could accumulate, asked if pneumatic pumps to pump in sand would not obvi- ate the dangers. Witness said he did not think pumps could pump sand into some of the cavi- ties. The Commissioner explained that it would net be dry sand, but sand and water. Mr Edwards suggested that if steel bar arching were used that would be a basis for the sand. The witness was unable to express an opinion en the point. The Commissioner remarked that it was rather an expert point. Mr Edwards examined witness con- cerning the, water supply in th? colliery, and suggested that there were not suffic- ient water pip: to effectively fight the fire. Witness could not say. Had you, in fact, sufficient pipes to effectually fight this fire?—If wo had as much water as we liked we couldn't fight it. The Commissioner Had you sufficient pipes down to adequately fight the fire ? Witness admitted tha'tj they had not. because others w ere put down. But some of the pipes were broken and, had to be repaired. ff Mr "Edwards DortV you think that with the possible dangers of this colliery there should be very much greater pre- cautions taken as to the water supply below ?—Yes. Answering Mr Edward Williams (for the Federation of Colliery Examiners' Association), witness said he did not think it would be advisable fcr one man, paid by the State, to be stationed at each colliery as a local inspector. The collieries were already State-inspected. IMPORTANT POINTS Mr Williams suggested that it would be a good thing if firemen were sup- plied with a tracing of their district and of the adjoining districts. Witness thought some good might ocme of it. The Commissioner said the court would take note of the suggestion. The Commiitioncr asked the witness whether he did not think it would be a good thing if the method of testing for gas with a lamp or a. rod were doro away with and the testing done by the lamp in the hand. Witness I agree, if you think so. The Commissioner Well, give it ser- ious thought, will you?—Yes. Wm. Williams, the day shift overman for the Pretoria and Aberystwyth dis- tricts of the mines, told the Commissioner that he was away ill on the day of the explosion. The Commissioner Very fortunate for JV' LAMP ON A STICK. The Commissioner You have heard this way of testing for gas in these high places with a. stick. Do you think it is a satisfactory way?—Yes, I think it is satisfactory. The Commissioner poiritedi out that as the eyesight, of people varied, one man might be able to tee the flame flicker and another would not. Would it not be better, he asked, to make doubly sure by testing for gas with the lamp in the ha.tMi ? Witness Yes. Answering Mr Smillie, witness said he agreed with Mr Shaw's theory that the explosion originated in the lamp station. Mr T. Richards, M.P. (for the South Wales Miners' Federation), caused much amusement when, in asking the witness questions concerning colliery labourers, he read the following list of occupations from which it had been suggested col- liery labourers were recruited Music- I ians, butlers, music-hall artistes, coach- men, gardleners, drivers, University graduates, seamen, railwaymen, tin and steel plate workers. (Laughter). Witness said he did not remember see- ing that list in the newspapers. Mr Richards remarked that he was afraid the lawyers' profession was too profitable for them to find their way into the collieries. (Laughter). MIRTH-PROVOKING ANSWER Where do the labourers come from to your colliery? Witness God knows; I don't. (Loud laughter). Witness added, in reply to Mr Rich- ards, that they go agricultural labourers in the coal districts also. Mr Richards put it to the witness that the labourer did not get any different treatment from the skilled collier. Witness No. Is there anyone who give him any in- struction whatever before he enters the pit with his safety lamn as to the pur- pose of his being supplied with an in- (Continued at bottom of next column ) t"L': ii' ,1

MACHINE GUN

'....w.i £60,000 RACE ROUND…

PONTARDAWE COUNCIL

....... What Labour Fights…

[No title]

THE MORAL of SOUTH AFRICA

THE SENGHENYDD INQUIRY.