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AFTER THE WAR—WHAT ? i

COMPENSATION AWARDS.

MAESTEG DENTIST'S BIDE I

CHECKWEIGHER .OR INSPECTOR?

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9114-dimili""I 1-1-Irip- -…

BIG FIRE AT MAESTEG.I

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?.!9Tttiim-Y)i?f*?f

I MORE NURSES WANTED. I

I THE BRITANNIC ASSURANCE…

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jMINE LEADER'S POSTERS.

SAFETY LAMPS Y. NAKED LIGHTSI

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SOUTH WALES COLLIERY ENGINEMEN.

THREE BROTHERS AND THREE.…

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I WAR- STORIES.

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I WAR- STORIES. I FROM BATTLEFIELD AND SEA. An officer writing from the front says:— "A certain Scottish Territorial tegiment has been learning trenchwork with us. Our colonel was rather amusing in describing the way he took their colonel round the trenches. In his words: We came to a drain, so I told him to be careful. No good; he was in it. Then we passed a shell hole. Splash! He was in it. A little later we came to a tele- phone wire. 'Look out!' I said, 'Here's some wire!' Down he went again. He mast have been quite wet at the end of it." I WHAT A CHANGE. "I walked into the nearest market town. What a difference from a month or two ago! It shows how the Belgian people regain their confidence wherever the British soldier is. When we first arrived at this town the Ger- mans had only just left; hardly any people were there. All the houses were deserted, the shops closed, the streets dirty; no food or milk or anything to be bought. And now, what a change! Shops crowded with all kinds of articles. Hotels and restaurants busy as can be; barbers, shoemakers, dentists, all re- turned to their business; in fact, everybody back at their old homes. All due to the Brit- ish soldier, and the great trust in us."—A Sergeant-Major in the H.A.C. THE FIRST BAYONET CHARGE. Private A. Bond, of the Connaught Ran- gers. writes: inever shall I forget my first bayonet charge. We were in the trench for two days and nights, and only had four men slightiy wounded, when the order came, 'Col- lective fire!' Then 'Fix your bayonets.1 fol- lowed by 'Crawl out of the trench and lie flat in front,' then the whistle went— 'Charge!' and over two hundred men charged nearly four hundred yards. We dropped in dozens, but kept on, reached the German trenches, and jumped in, and absolutely dug the Ger- mans out. You ought to have heard them yell, and run! We got three trenches that night, but had forty killed, and as many again hurt in some way or other." GERMAN'S DIABOLICAL ACT. A passenger on the Falaba, the liner which. was sunk by a German submarine with a loss of over 100 lives, said that though the Falaba tried to escape by full steam ahead, the sub- marine was much too fast for her. The Falaba was overhauled in about half an hour. They sent up a rocket, ordering us to stop, and we did so. They then came round on to our star- board side and took up a position from which to fire. They allowed us only five or six minutes in which to lower the boats and get clear of the vessel. They torpedoed us at about a quarter to one, and th ? was nothing left of the ship in about te; minutes. Of course, we had no chance of bi ,ging anythingi with us. There were six women on board, but* no children. I believe four of the women havefi been saved. I believe that in addition to the captain, the purser and the doctor are dead. The whole affair was most dastardly. They gave us no chance at all. It was nothing but? sea murder." i t. ? <* A t?'d LAUGHED AND JEERED. f?j Another of the survivors of the steamships i Falaba (named Blair, an engineer) was inter- < aj viewed in passing through Swansea from Mil- ? ford. He said that about 5 o'clock on Sunday y morning they sighted the submarine, who or- dered them to heave to. The skipper (Captain Dayies), however, replied by putting on full, speed, but about 12.30 o'clock they were over- hauled and the captain of the submarine said they were going to sink her. The Germans on11 vfl board laughed and jeered at them as they t launched the boats. Their wireless operator tried hard to get communication with Land's End, and afterwards said he had done so, and, < that two destroyers were being despatched. When the boats were being lowered the sub- marine torpedoed the vessel. Some of the boats fell into the water. The captain was on the bridge at the time, and jumped into tho water and was picked up, but died afterwards. The trawlers Eileen Emma and Orient were,, sighted, and came to the assistance of the crewtJ,t in the boats, and so far as the interviewed man' 1 (Blair) knew all except one or two were saved, including six women.