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UNFOUNDED "CHARGES BY "P--1tP…

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UNFOUNDED "CHARGES BY P -1 t P A SERVANT (I iL. | "REMARKABLE EVIDENCE AT LLANRWST POLICE COURT. THE CASE DISMISSED. At the Llanrwst Polioe Court on Monday and Tuesday, before M.r H. J. W. W atlin-g, Major Priddle, and Mr J. R. yviuiwr", the case in which Louisa Hughes, 9, Bryn Rhys, Gian Con. way, applied for an affiliation order against Witiiam Phillips, Dodtford, Baok St. George, Llandudno, greengrocer, came up for rehearing, tho Bench having been equally divided at the ^itr^Twigge Ellis appeared for the applicant,, And Mr Marks, Llandudno, for the defendant. Mr Twigge Elli^, in opening ttos c^' a J had claimed the attention of the magi3tratw at a previous court for a considerable t• vi«' tfK Bench was equally divided, and ordered that tJt-e- case should be reheard. The plain-tiff was a single woman, 23 year., of a-e and had been in defendants service for from his shop. A few days.before l*>t he and his wife went to Birmingham. U-1"1 S," turned on (h. 30th. or 31st a.nd jlept at l>od £ ord every night until danua y Alone. In response to a letter addi^«-d to ber bv Mrs PHILIUP&J the applicant returned to Dod Sd on the evening of January 7th, and reached tl-3 house about 8.30 p.m. Mr Pmkips *asin the kitchsai writing, and she and then retired to bod. It one of the assistants to -all at he every night with the suvbla key and to return for it «ja<rly the following morning. He caJled at th house about 8.45 p.m. Ada, as she «• -0- by the family, went to bed, arid sometim, d U)g the night Mr Phillips (so the p ontiff al- leged) entered hor room and committed an as- sault upon her. The assistant called key on the following morning, and she had to tr0 to her employer, wiio was in bed tor it. ► IV in a vory agiUtod state of mind, and a statement to Johnny Jones, the a^stont. Mr Marks objected to the statement being re- fXl Phillips went back to Birmingham that, day (Saturday) and subsequently returned with his wife. Nothing happened until_June to far as defendant was concerned but on Marcn -15th the applicant went to see Dr. Jone», ijl;m dufco JuSon. On Jane 25th having heard of applicant's condition, her mother by a William Williams, went to f and asked one of his assistants to call him out Mr PhiJiiips came out and said, \v hat want?" She replied, 'I have called atout Louisa. You kno.v m what stata she i^> she is blaming you for it." He dented the charge, and aik-ed her to wait and acwmp^y him to his house. They waited until the> got tired, and the defendant not makuig an ap- pearance, they went towards Mostyn-str^t, ac oomf»an k-d by the applicant s Carrie Shortly after they saw the df.lCr^; i^ ^gfrrw the street in tiho dilution of his house. Came followed and went with him to ha house, iVfte a talk with Lo&isa .(Ada) Mrs l^ps wt her to sign a paper winch was Mrs l'milu^' dictation to the effect that M Phillips was not to blanie for bar oondltlOJl. She si-ned it for Mrs Phillips sake On the following Sunday (June 26th) ed plaintiff to try and do something for bun,, and said ho would see that sno was r l)a^lts' She went) home that day and saw h~r parents, but dad not see Mr Phillips until the morning, when sho told him that hei parents would not do anything unuess tiling in black and whte. He spiled; You see •Mrs' Phillips and ask her to allow, you to go borne to-day and try and do something. ftermission was obtained, and she returned Ve again, and in the evening returned to Llandudno, accompanied by her lather, and met Mr Phillips in Madoc-strcet. Her lather told defendant that he had oame down to see- hi about his daughter, and see what he was pie- Dared to do. Defendant said ho wouitu write on following Friday and say what he. would do. On Wednesday, November 29th,, the taken to Mr Marks' office. The aeicnaant had told her to go with Mrs Phillips, and £ Bee she was all right. Even at the °AK r: told Mr Mai-ks "1 can b'.ame no one but Mr Phillips." Mr Marks: That is what she says. On the following; day, one of the millincrs in Mrs Phillips' employ feniarkcd tbat it was ail oyer the town that plaintiff blamed Mi I^hilJi; s, and that the people who frequented the snop s;>eaJving about it. The cat was then out of the bag, and Mrs PnuLhps ordort-d her out of t.he house. She then said to the defendant, "You know, Mr Phillips, I am not tenmg lies; it is all true." He replied. 'T know that; l will give you CS and you had better go home" Thcy went back to the house, and defendant gave her the £ 3 and. hor wages, which were due, as well as a month's wages in lieu of notice. Sh3 went, out with the money to the next house and show- ed What she ted received from the defendant without any dday. If plaintiff was not telling ilio truth her's was the MOST REMARKABLE STORY 'ner concocted, and would go down to history by the side of Sapiflura (laughter) Her evidence however, was oori-oborated, and he felt assured tihaifc tlic Bench, would be satisfied that she was veiling a true and natural story. 1 iu.iiitin s child was born. Dr. Jonoj, who attended hor during was born. Dr. Jonoj, who attended her during ler illness, would inform the court that the fIhild was fully developed. He asked the Bench If they were satisfied with the evidence to mark their sonse of the gravity of -the oase by mak- W the order against the defendant amount to ITeuin that would enable his client, to rear the Shild in a similar mariner as the defendant brought Ul) his other children. Louisa liughos. the plaintiff, a delicate look- in"1 girl, was allowed to sit during hor exami- nation. She repeated the cvidonee she offered at the previous hearing. On Friday, January 7th she arrived at Llandudno at 8.10 p.m., and was at. Dolford at 8.20 or 8.30 p.m. The de- fendant- was writing in the kiitchen when she reached tho house. She prepared his supper, and both sat down and ate together. Johnny Jones called with tho key of the stable about 9 p.m. As was hit custom the key was kept in defendant's pooket, because he wished to know what time Jones went (to work in the morning, Old she had to go to defendant every morning IT it. The defendant shouted to Jones and jjed him if lie had been to the Grand Hotel. 3he could not remember what Jones replied. Plaintiff went to bed abbut 9.30. Some time afterwards the defendant came to her bedroom and assaulted her. She said, "You mutt leave --to alone," but he would not. She then said, if something happens to me you will be hiamed lor it." Defendant- was with her for two or tjiree hours, if not more. He left her bedroom during the ni'g'ht. She went down a little after 7 a.m. Johnny Jones called for tho key! and he saw that alio went upstairs for it. The defendant, who was in his own bpd. gave it to her. Slie went to see Dr. Jones, Llandudno Junction, and told him what had happened. Mr Marks: I object to that. Mr Ellis: Very well, Dr. Jones is here, and will be able to tell <the court what Ada told him. After seeing Dr. Jones, plaintiff saw defen- dant, who asked hor if she had been to a doc- tor. She said she had, and that the doctor lorad told her that she was in trouble. She added tliav, 4io did n-ot know wha-t to do. Defendant r'epiiedr "You must keep it very quiet, and 1 will see you all right; it is no good you crying." She was very upsot, as ehe had always been respected in her places. He said again, "I will see you all right, and you can come back when all is over if you will keep quiet in the meantime." She did so, and kept it from her own parents. On June 25th defendant was out with Mrs Phillips' baby, and when she returned Mr and Mrs Phillips were standing in the kitchen. Mrs Phillips turned to witness and said, "What about this, Ada?" Plaintiff replied, "It is quite true, is it not, Mr Phillips?" Mrs Phillips retorted, "I would not beleve you if you went on your know; he would riot touch you with his finger. \\Unes3 replied, "If you don't believe me now, yo,J vill have to believe it again." JviR.S PHILLIPS THEN FAINTED, and was laid on tho cooioh. When she re- covered she told witness that she would havo Vo clour out, or she would get a policeman to Ilear her out. Mr Phiilips then said, "Some- body has been shoving this into Ada's head." Witness replied# "No, they havo not; no one has done so." Ho said that Mrs Phillips and himself had been talking about it in bed' the night before, and that she cried all night about the plaintiff. Mr Phillips said he told hij wife •-bait it would be a wosderful thing if ho was not blamed for it. He did not deny it, how- over. When MJTB Phillips was out of tine room he told her (witness) that if she would deny it before Mrs Phillips he would do anything for hor. After that Oarrie (her sister) and Mr Phillips went into the back kitchen, at the re- quest of Mrs Phillips. Mrs Philips then said that witness would have to sign a paper to deny it. She replied that she oauld not sign it. She said, "I will spell it and tell JW whjLt to put do wo. Unless you do this," she added, "I wiil make you that you will not get a situation far or near." Plaintff replied, "Well, Mrs Phillips, I will sign it for your sake and the children, but. I oan blame no one else but Mr Phillips." The papar was produced, and witness wrote out what Mrs Phillips dic- tated. Carrie and defendant then returned to the kkclien, and Mrs Phillips told her sister that she "had been a very good girl, bad been kind to the children, thait she had been an honest girl, and when everything was over she should return." On that condition PLAINTIFF SIGNED THE PAPER. Mr Phillips was sitting by witness' side with the baliv in his surms. He tried to put his arms aronn.d witness's waist when Mrs Phillips exclaimed, "Now, Will, don't you forget your- self." He replied, "I can't help it, Molly." On Wednesday, June 29th, Mrs Phillips told her she would have to aooompainy her to Mr Marks' office, and deny it from Mr Phillips. If you refuse to go you will have to cl-ear out, and I will get a. policeman and all the rest." Witness became frightened, and said eho would go with her for her sake, and she went. Be- iore she went she saw the -defendant, and he eaid, "If you go toO Mr Marks and deny it I will see you all right." He crossed his face and went en his oath that he would keep his word, and tapped his pooket, and told her he would give her money. Mrs Phillips was not in the room at the time. She. then went with Mrs Phillips to Mr Marks' offioe. Mrs Phillips said to Mr Marks, "I have come with Ada to deny it from Mr Phillips." Mr Marks told Mrs Phillips to go out into the hall. Mr Marks then wrote something on a paper, and said, "Is that what you want to say," and showed her the paper. As she could not read Mr Marks road it out, and she replied, "I am not willing to sign that, Mr Marks. God knows I can bring no one else up but Mr Philljps." Mr Marks replied, "if you are not willing to sign it, Mrs Phillips had bet- ter clear you out this morning." Witness then SAID SHE WOULD SIGN IT for Mrs Phillips and the sake, as she was very fond of them, and she did. Witness then went on to explain how Miss Ed- munds, one of the milliners, on July 1st, informed Mrs Phillips that everyone in the town connected Mr Phillips with witness, and now Mrs Phillips cleared her out, and that Mr Phillips gave her money. When she was examined by Mrs Phillips' doctor on June 23rd she told him that she blamed Mr Phillips for it. Mr Marks took eKception to this statement. Mr Ellis; We can do without your comments. I Mr Ma rks: But I have the right to do so. Mr Ellis: You will have to do without it. Mr Marks: Will you take the ruling of the Clerk then whether this can bo taken as evidence? The Clerk It is not admissible. The Chairman: We will leave that then, Mr Ellis. W itness continued, and said she showed the S3 about ten minutes after she received it to Mr Downing, who lived next door, and then she went home end showed the money to her pa.nts. She went out with Jimmy Owen two or three t mes, the last time being on Christmas Eve. There had been no impropriety between her and Owen. PLAINTIFF CROSS-EXAM (NED. Mr Marks Your father told us at the last hear- ing that Jimmy Owen was at Bryn Rhys whoci you were there on your holidays? Witness: I never saw him after Curistmos Eve. Mr Marks: Was he at Bryn Rhys during your holidays ? Witness Y 03, on Christmas Eve. Mr Marks: Any other time?—No. Mr Marks: You suggest you went to see your doctor on 15th of March; then you spoke to Mr Phillips. Why did you not give that in your evidence at the last court? Witness: I can't remember everything; you asked mo if I did go to him, and I replied "Yes." Mr Marks: In your evidence last time you said that "the first time Mr Phillips knew about it wa.s when your mother went down to see him." Why do you say that now? W itness: I told you that Mr Phillips wanted me to keep it quiet for his wife's sake, and I did keep it quiet. I never said that July 1st was the fjL time he hoard of it. I told you that he knew about it before Mrs Phillips, who knew until my mother came down. Mr Marks: You say you were respected by the. family, and that no impropriety had ever taken place between Mr Phillips and you during the five years you were in the defendant's employ- ment until, as you allege, January 7th last? Witness: Yes, that is quite true. Mr Marks: Mr Phillips was invariably cour- teous towards you?—Yes. My Marks: And can you give any reason for his"aJIcged lapse on January 7th?—No. Mr Marks: You say the periodical inconven- ience commenced on January 6th?—Yes. Mr Marks: And yet you declare Mr Phillins was guilty of impropriety on the 7th, the day after?—Yes Mr Marks: When did the inconvenience cease? --I never saw it aftoiwards. Mr Marks- When did you suspect your oondi tion ?-I wa. telling Mr Phillips about it all the time. As the result of no inconvenience occtirring9- Yes. Did you go to see your medical adviser in March ? Yes, my eyes were bad, and Mr Phillips said I had better consult a doctor. Do you mean to tell us that Mr Phillips was a ware of your condition, and asked you to "o and see the doctor? ° He saw my eyes were bad, and suggested that I should see a doctor. Did Mrr Phillips ask you to go?-No. Did she mention anything to you about your eyes ? Yes, hc sad, "Your eyes must be very pain- ful." I replied, "Yes, they are." Did you know in March of your condition?— Yes, but I told no one but Mr Phillips, as he wanted me to keep quiet about it, and I kept it quiet On the day you cam, to my office did you suig-g-esit that ajiytLimfg I said or diid was un- fair to you or ijicotrrect ? You said :if I was not willing to Si., that pmpar it would bo better for Mrs Philips to eccid me away that morning". You know" that to be A DELIBERATE LIE? No, it is -perfectly true. Whom you oaaaa into my room, M>rs PhiJiiips came to the door. Did I not say to hor, ''I will not see you oil thus matter, I will 800 Ada by hecseif ? Yes, yo-u told her to g'>() into the hall. Did I them call a clerk to come into my roam with s-amo paper?—No. Did I not tell you I would put nothing down on the paper except what you told mo? No, you said, "Is this what you WMlt?" amd you rtaad it out to 1M. Do you really nioaai to say that you did not tell me what to put down on the paper? I told you I was not willing to sig-n that papfii- as God kmteW I had ano ome ei&o but MJr Phillips to blame. You them got up and said, "Mrs Phillips wall have to seaid you out this mormmg." I then signed the paper. It was a threat thon D-Yw. Did I not toll you if what was written down was not true you must not sign it? No, you did not. Did you not tell Mrs PhiKriips wiiem she spoke to you about it that Jimmy Ow-eoi had taken advantage of yoni an the G-as IVi-d? No. Did you write this deaiiaJ and sign it a.t Dodfond ? Yes, at her ddotahiom, on coaidatioci. tihaft they were going todo everything for me. Do you expect the justices to believe <tih.at you hQd to sigm that at Dodfard amd sub- eoq'weHitf y another at my offioe, and trust to theor word to ibe denied if they desi'ned? Yes, I believed their word. Did you know that MR PHILLIPS HAD DENIED IT to your mother? f Yes, he did eo by his shop. You say your tather came down for a pro- mise on black and white, and went back with a. stary that ho would get a. letter an Satur- day, and yet ihe waited mnti-1 July Utili bo- 1 fore seeimg a solicitor on the matter? I went to a solicitor on JuJy 2nd or the day after I left. I put it to you, that youar ta.1e from 1x»- ginning to end ds a tide, suggested by oth,? Every word is true what I say hemo to- day. Did not Mrs Philips find out to her great surprise about your condition as a tresuilt of exanmraticufl by Dr. Woodihouae? — Sibo did not tedl roe. Did she proffese you that you would be allowed to stop thefre xaatil the 14ut mown t Yes, if I would demy it from Mr Philips. What do you waunt the mag-istratea t-Q be- lieve ,<about MT Doismnimg Wihem )|ou sa*' jcu wont to show him thte X3? Tho Chairman: Why diid you allow the xoomfij to &r Downing? L I got it through him, he helped me. M.r Maaks: You ehowod him some ooins, and you took them to him for the purpose of this ca&e? Mr Pihildips gave me the money. Did you mot go to Mrs Phillips' room to say good-tbye bied'ore leavim-, and tk-clajxi be- fore .a witness that you had liod, amd that Mr Phillrips was mot the father? No, I did not 000 bar that mo rowing. Do you say that Mr Phillips called Miss Edmunds downstairs? Yes. You know she swears &lie went down first before Mr Ph iJJ ips ? Mr Phillips caane down first, and then cfiZilicd. Miss Edmunds down to onaTole hlOr. to witness the payment of my w.ag.es. After you. had been paid the alleged X3 what, happened? I did not see any of them afterwards, but went straight to 11.r Downing. How did Mr Philips know how much was due to you, and that you owed Mrs PliiiUips maney ? Miss Edimunds told him.. Cnarlcs Roberts slept in the house with Mr Phillips until Christmas Eve, and after Mr Phillips returned he slept by himself until January 7th ? Yres, I said that at the last court. On the alight of January 7th be slept at Clif- ton-road ? No, ihe did not; !he slept in his own house. He did not know you were coming back that night ? 1 said before that hc had written to Mrs Phil- lips that I had better come back to prepare the houae. You went to bed about 9.30 p.m.?—Yes. And you swear Mr Phillips was in your room for three or four hours?—Yes. If I can prove, that HE WAS AT CLIFTON-ROAD from 10.30 p.m. that night you will surely admit having made a mistake? He was at Dodford ail night, and lie wad in bed When Johnny Jones canic, for the key next morning, Jones was not asked about this at the last hearing ?—No, Not untiti you found we had evidence to prove, wheno Mr Pniiiips was that night ? J. Jones bad to call on Friday night and on Saturday morning about the. stable key. There can be no mistake about it?—No. Yet you did not say a word about it at the last hearing,, although it is sucih damning evi- dence ? You did not ask me. Tho Chairman: Did Mr Phillips rise out of bed in your presence to get the- key ? Yes, and he also asked for a cup of tea and toast which I took up to 'him. Mr Marks: You did not offer this evidence at t-Lie previous hoa,ring ? I answered 'svory question asked me. Did you mention anything to either of the two milliners at Dodford about Mr Phillips? No, I did not. I did not often speak to them; we were not on intiinato terms. IVii,(-To did Mr Phillips get the £ 3?—From, a drawer in the kitchen. Was it locked?—Yes. Where is tho drawer ?—In the aide cupboard. Tae C'haiirman You say you went to bed and that the d'ofendant followed you. Was there any larking between tho defendant and you in the kitdheii before you retired? No, he said "We wiil have to hurry up to bed," So I w-ant to bed. The Chairman: How long had you been in bed before the defendant appeared in your room ? F,rom 14 to 2 hours. About 11 p.m. ?—Yes. John Jcne-s, l-a-te assistant with Mr..PhiLlijxi, repeated his evidence, at the previous hearing. He called atDodlord about 8.45 p.m., on Janu- ary 7th with the stable key. Ada answered the door, and Mr PhiEips shouted from the kitchen, "Johnny, have you been to the Grand Hotel?" Witness answered in tho negative), and Mr Phil- lips replied Don't forget, to go in the morn- ing." The following morning he called for the key about 7 a.m. Ada came to the door, and then went upstairs for the key. She appeared to be upset and crying, and witness asked wlhat was the matter ? Cross-examined: He told no one that Mr Phil- lips 'had misconducted himself with Ada, eXQ)pt Jus aunt tho net-x day. He had not offered ti) is evidence at the previous court as he did not know ho was allowed to do so, .He had never been in such a ca-s-, before. Joseph Davies, plaintiff's father, repeated his evidence relative to his visit to Mr Phillips, with whom he spoke in Maddoc-stroet. Mary Hughes, the plaintiff's mother, repeated her story of her vist to Mr Phillips a couple of days before her husband, and swore to seeing the money in hsr daughter's possession on her re- turn home from W. WTdiiams, Dcganwy, a fresh witness, stated that he accompanied the plaintiff's mother to see Mr Phillips, and corroborated her evidence. ,u The Chairman: Why did you accompany Mrs Hughes to Llandudno?—Because she asked me. Carrie Hughes, sister to the plaintiff, another fresh witness, deposed that she called at Mr Phillips' house with her mother. Mrs Phillips came down and asked, "What is the matter?" Defendant replied, "Well, Molly, you know about this scandal. We were talking about Ada. They blame it on to me." Mrs Phillips replied, "Never mind, Will." Ho said, "Do you believe it?" Mrs Phillips turned round and said "No, Will; all the world would not make me believe it." Plaintiff then oame in and Mrs Phdiips stamped her foot on the floor and asked, "What do you mean by saying that my husband is the father of your child? Go upstairs and pack your box." Ada replied, "Why, I have done nothing wrong." Mrs Phillips retorted, You will go out of this house." Ada went upstairs to pack her box with witness, and on coming down Mrs Phillips paid her a month's wages; but Ada. would not go with- out a month's wages in lieu of a notice, and Mrs Phillips told her to summon her for it and added, "If you do not go I will fetch a policeman to you." Ada replied, "I have done nothing wrong, you can do as you like." Mrs Phillips then sent Mr Phillips and witness to the back-kitchen. Mr Phillips remarked to witness, "Mrs Phillips and the children are going to Tre4riw on their holi- days. No one will notice Ada's condition. She can stop for a few months." They were then called Back to the other room. Mrs Phillips was sitting on the couch, and got up to reach a white piece of writing paper. Mr Phillips sat on the couch and put his arm round Ada's waist. Mrs Phillips turned to him and said, "Don't forsret yourself, Will," and he replied, "I can't help it." Mrs Phdiips got the paper and said, "I am very sorry for Ada.. the poor girl has lost her head: she is going to dsn the paper." She was then FORCED TO SIGN THE PAPER. Mrs Phillips told her what to put down and spolt the words, and Mr Phdiips spelt two words and walked about the room with his hands to his head crying, "Dear, dear, dear!" Mrs Philhps then told witness to help Ada to remove her box back to her room and said, "Ada has been a vea-y good girl, and li am sorry for her." Orofii-exajnined: My father and mother taiught me to speak the truth always. I wanlted them to bring the child here to show. He is so like Mr Phillips that it would be the best evidence that could bo produced (laughter). Mr Marks: Do you wish us to believe that Mr Phillips was such a fool as to plaoo his arms round Ada's waist before his wife? Yes, I do say so. Percy Downing, who live) next door to Mr Phillips, said) plaintiff showed him about Bo or JE4 im g'oid and some silver. The Chairman: Why did she show you the money ? She oame to the shop crying, and I told her to go to Mr Phillips. Sbo did not refer to her condition. Catherine Davies, 4, King's-road, Llandudno, gave evidence relative to what Johnny Jones told her about Ada and Mr Phillips, andl she told him not to mention it to anybody. J Mnie Owen, 20, Jubilee-street, said he knew Lauisu, but he had not been in her company this year. He was with her a week before last Christmas. He was out with her three or four times altogether. Nothing improper had happened between them. Louisa was THE STRAIGHTEST GIRL IN LLAN- DUDNO. It was false that anything improper took place between them by the gas works. Ho met Mr Phillips during the summer, when ho eoi-di, "Here, Jimmy, I never see you with Adia now." Witness replied: "No, I am not going with her now." He then said, "She is a very good girl, Jimmy, amd is very fond of you." Witness re- plied, "la she? I am glad someone is fond of me," Mr Phillips appeared to take an interest in witness's affairs. Cross-examined!: He would never have thought of insulting Ada, amd' had never mis- behaved himself with her. THE DOCTOR'S EVIDENCE. Dr. J. D. Jones. LlandwinD Junction, said he saw plaintiff -three timoea. Tha first occasion was March 15th. He did not tall her then wharf; was the matter with her, aj he had not concluded, his diagnosis. She Ame again m April 7th, when he made further examination. He asked her whether she had a sweetheart, and she replied that she had not, but admittd to an iodJetioetivQ with » C D. in Januacj, film called again on June 9th, and it was then, that he told her what was the matter with her, tbouglh lie bad suggested it on April 29th. Mr Marks then addressed the Bench for the defence. He said what was the position of affairs. Hero was a girl, who for five years had been ÍDI the service of the defendant, treated1 by him with respect and courtesy as well as by his wife. Her regard and love for the childSron had been eruoh that although an- gered at her condition when bold by their doc- tor, Mr and Mrs Phillips kept her aaid took her back. The Saturday plaintiff's mother came to see Mr Phillips was the first occasion a whisper liad reached defendant that Ada blamed him. He at onoo denied it, and asked the mother to acoompajiy him to his wifo, -to whom he said there was no truth in the charge. On the face of it the OMI) was an extraordinary one. The medical evidence declared it to be not quite impossibly but very improbable, so much so that it verged upon the impossible. It was allegedI that the defendant suddenly, with no previous signs of impropriety, and whilst plaintiff was in bed suffering from a physical. inoonvenience, went to her bedroom and. committed' an. assault upon her. Plaintiff said she signed the dooi- monts wider compulsion, although the house she was in abutted into the street, and her £1. ter was in the room with her. Where was the compulsion? She could have easily left too house if sho wished. But ahe cli-d nothing of the sort. She swore that she was promised something. Her fatlwr-caine down, had a conversation with the defendant, and was satis- fied to roturn with a bag of strawberries (laugh- tor). If ho believed the girl that the defendantu W<Lj father of her child he would not have gone back in the way he did. He would have natllrally consulted a solicitor when he received no letter from the defendant. But he did not move in the matter until July 12th, when de- fendant received a letter from a solicitor on behalf of tho plaintiff. It was answered by a poijrii blarjic defnial. Did thoy think for a moment that defendant would submit to and faca a public ordeal, as he was now being sub- jected to, if ho was not innocent? Did they not think that he would have shrunk from publicity in the press? No. he would have said, "I am responsible for the child, I will admit it, no publicity for me." Mr Ellis and himself knew that that was done daily. But the evidence was so CURIOUSLY CONTRADICTORY that he was impelled to ask the justices not. to proceed further with the case. There might be .f-'Ûmo lingering doubt in some minds t/a I the girl had got into her head, whether as the result of brooding over the matter too long, or otherwise put up to it, that defendant vai really the father of tlie child. The girl find- ing herself in trouble had to look round to see what she could do, and she either decided or was told to blame someone of substance. The DEFENDANT'S STORY w-ais a simple one. He had ai-over had any iaterooTirso with tlie plaintiff. Surprised at finding hor at his house, he ietft it at 10.30 p.m., and went to his sistea'-dmJaw's to s-leop, as witness oou-Id prove. Defendant would t-al th, Court what occua-red when tho o2.p- p'.ioaoit 'a fat heir and mother oanno to see him, and Mrs PlioJiirps wiouid v-1l them how pLaintiff Jimmy Owen. She wieait up to Sirs Phillips' room, and pleaded for forgivcoi'sss for havriag' bocm. ao wicked, acid than, in the jxnaauiioo of Mies Evans, toud her that she had borai tolling her • a lio, and that Mr Phillips wa0 mot the father of hetr child. As to too < £ 3, lYLr Marks sugg-estod the money was pro- cutrcd fnxn s.oimiewhefre for the'«-purpose of mowing" to Mr Dowmiaiig, at the instig-atiooi of oikors. The girl wsaintod thorn to bolneve that eho went next door, but as a matt-ar of fact, sho had to traverse about 150 yards in oaxlar to ivach Mr Do Mining's shop. "You atne. aslxd," continued Mu: Marks, "to ruin a m?.a,—one who is highly respected a maLU Cif •admitted intogrity, to ruin his prospects ain life on such evidon-ce as th:Î5 offaried by the plaintiff." Let ,thecal consider the gTravity of tue caw -against tho defendant, and tILa i,-n- porteaioa. ttho corroborative evidtanoe being sn'bstaniiiatrvie, which he coarbeuucied it was not. As to the evidence of Jimmy Jones, liD thought it was apparent that h.e had not oame thare in the antarest of justice. He said, "I wouud have conio without having a tiU'b'pcoiiia an order to give cvidctnod against ■his l-a-te «unployi>r. It was TiCillJ¡;,¡.rk,:1i!iJe that he could, Te-memibcr,. aftetr the lapse of twelve months, the exact time lie weait to the defen- dant's hoti-io cli tba evening- of January 7t.h, and why should he have gxxne out of his way to looik at the clock. lie felt assured that worships, after hearing- the evidence in the scales of jusitice, woiLd be. enabled to acquit tnc deteindant of the serious charge against him. DEFENDANT GIVES EVIDENCE. Mr Wiliiam Philip j, the defendant, repeated the evidence be offered at the previous hearing, and strongly denied that any impropriety, in any shape or iorni," had taken place between him and plaijitut. lie had been a member of a Noncon- forms church 'ior about tw.lve years. If-- was an Englishman. He aho denied ever havin- given plaintiff £ 3 or any othor money except her wages. Hor statements wore a tissue of untruths from beginning to end. Cross-examined: Plaintiff came in about 10 p.m. on January 7th. Johnny Jones did not come to the house that night at all. and ho had no conversation with him. He often brought. th.J stable key to witness at the market, while oeea- s.onally lie went to the stable for it. The kev was always kept on a nail in the kitchen Wit noes us d to keep it in his pocket about two years ago, but not since. On January 7th he lc t busmets about 7 p.m. He could not say whether lie went straight home or not, he was there about 8 p.m. and was writing for a short time. The plaintiff came in about 10 pm She arr.ved unexpectedly. She did not prepare sup- per, but when he left the house she was having a cup of tea. Ho went straight to Clifton-road after posting his letters. No impropriety had token place between him and the girl before he left the house or at any other time. He could not account for her story; it was a surprising one. Ho did not return to his house until about 1 p.m. on the following day. There was no rea- son for the girl to be agitated that morning Ho could not explain what caused her to blame him. Johnny's statement that ho had been to the house on the evening of January 7th was a dùLbcrab lie. The first time he heard of the girl's condition was on June 23rd, after Dr. Woodhousc had examined her; and the first time he was blamed was when her mother came to soe lam. It was untrue that he asked plaintiff to keep it quiet, absolutely untrue. It Ni-otild have been the wisest thing to send the girl away at once, but she went on her kneos and be°"ed to be allowed to stay, admitting at the same time that she had been lying. He did not kil her she should com? back after all was over. The state- ment that witness pit his arm around plaintiff's waist before his wife and plaintiff's sister was ridiculous and quite untrue. She signed the paper of her own free will without the semblance ol compulsion. The court then adjourned at 8.35 p.m. until 'flH\:xJaJ mornirg.

A SATURDAY NIGHT SCENE AT…

TUESDAY'S HEARING.

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A WELSHMAN'S FIRST IMPRESSION…

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A SATURDAY NIGHT SCENE AT…