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--- -----------MERSOreETHSHlRE.

TALYCAFN MART.

THE CARNARYONBOROUGHS.

MR AUSTIN JONES AT CARNARVON.

MR AUSTIN JONES AND THE WORKENGMEisi.

MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY.

---LIBERAL MEETING AT CONWAY.

MAYOR OF CARMARVONS APPEAL.

FLINT BOROUGHS.

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FLINT BOROUGHS. OLONEL HOWARD'S CANDIDA- TURE. SNTHUSiASTEC UNIONIST MEET ING AT RHUDDLAN. An enthusiastic meeting in support of the ea.ndido.ure of Colonel Howard was hexl on Monday evening a.t the National Schools, Rhiudeilan. The room was crowded, andi tlie proceedings were of an orderly character. Mr R. C. Eayon and t.ho meeting was fiisfc ae'dreied by the Rev. Mr Clark, an CuU-r ok*xgyman, who made a strong a^>;x»l on bcha.'f of the ic, vahfits of Ireland against grant- ing Home Rule to Ireland. Ha asked whether the people of Great Britain were prepared to allow the fives and libei-ties of the peupde of Lister to be handed -o a party which had identified ih&Jf with the Land League, which e-uaid rneot and decide whether a mam co'uld be murdered- his cattle mauned, or his burned. The Protestants of Ulster had- always been I'ayail !O the Emipire, he asked: whether it was right that they should be handed over to these who had avowed their hatred' of iLl. and who had applauded when the British troops in South Africa were defeated (a voice: "That ia ntt Christian"). The situation from a naval aasfei military poi.n-t of view was also a serious one. It w(.,a Ili be an act of political insanity to hand over Ireland to these who might use it" as a baas of operations against thas ecu,miry. If Ulster was deserted now they oould not expect her to stand leyal in days to come. In the words of a Prcoe.tant Bishop, they didi not know what Ulster had done to be deeerted now, and handed over to the wtalvew. They in Ulster were of opinion, that k. wouidf be RUIN AND DISASTER TO IRELAND to give it Hom-e, Rule, and they were equally determined to resist it (a voice: "Has it meant ruin -to Canada). During the |xiot few days the following )»amph:et had been eirtiuku<>d .through Ireland: — "Irishmen, shun the aiany, the -n.-tvy. and- the police. Parents, trcia your children to hate those connected with them as they would hate a loatittsome disease. God eend the time when Ireland is a nation and the Bri- tish Empire v.A so to its own place." In the face of such things were they going to open the door to the greatest ipe> £ i £ .-jble dungor to which to w!hioh the Empire could p-ossibly be exjXAsed (cries oi "Never"). Alderman Phillips, of London, spoke on the question of Disetablishinent and Disendow- mcEt He eaid he was in favour of DiaeBUb- llehment) but it was di-iestaofiishiment of the devil and ail h:s works; but cf God's Church never (cheers). They heard a great deal about cheap foreign matches coming into this country, amd person-ady he thought they we-re unt?|>eek- ably dtear when th-L-v kqYt Kn.giighmen out of job; (hear, hear). 1 If he were a. member cf Parliament he wouid b.a^.g in., a Bill to the effect that no job should be given to a foreigner as km-g a., there was an Englishman but of work. The speaker then proceeded to deal with the question of old-age pensions and the reform of the House of Lords, and there were several interruptions oil- these iwiots, Mr Jones Morris ako addressed the meeting w in WeLih, and answered several questions put to him. Mr F. J. Gam-lin supported the coaididatture of Colonel Howard, and said he was prenarcd t<> BLAME THE UNIONIST PARTY for not having in their own interests long ago comeeded the demands for reform in the House of Lords. New tiiat the House of Lords saw that the natton demanded that rcifcrm they were ready to grant it. In tunes gene by he had taken part in debates on the Houae of Lords, and he had been frequently called upon to adopt the view that- the herod'tarv principle was wrong. It was by merit, and merit alone, that men, should sit in the Upper lfb-U6>3, and not merely because a man was the son of his faither (applau-se). As to the question of Tariff Reform from the Radical point cif view—and it was an important crie-I t was said to be the t.hin end of the wedge for a duty on imported corn, and that it would end in a heavy duty- as in same other countne-s. If thnt was what was like'y to happen ho would JlIJL support Tariff Re-form, but he believed in the pledge given by Mr Balfour that the price of food would not be in ere a -cd if Tariff Reform were adopted. As to Free Trade, he believed in it, and no doubt they would he surprised to hear him say so. but. lie believed it would be good if it were adopted throughout the world. It was, however, net good for this country when Great Britain .stood alone (hear, hear). Ho did not believe either party had all the virtues, nor did he believe that all the evil was on one side. Whait they had to db was to extra-et what was good from either party and to blend them into one harmonious whole {appbu :{,). It was his opinion that the Unionist Party was now on (lie right way for reforming the Heuss of Lords and the uplifting of the Empire, and on that account he a&lkodl for the support of the meeting [or Colonel Howard (appVmse).

GORONWY OWEN'S BIRTH PLACE.…

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MR LLOYD GEORGE

A ROYAL APPOINTMENT. --

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GORONWY OWEN'S BIRTH PLACE.…

MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY.