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TALYCAFN MART.

THE CARNARYONBOROUGHS.

MR AUSTIN JONES AT CARNARVON.

MR AUSTIN JONES AND THE WORKENGMEisi.

MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY.

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MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY. WHAT THE CONSERVATIVES HAVE DONE FOR THE DEMOCRACY. Mr Austin J ones addressed a mieetijug at the .National Schools, Dega-nwy, on Saturday even- ing. Alderman W. M. Sever Ocouipied the chair, the room being crowded t6 its, utmost capacity. Aft the outset, the Chairman said that tihey could congratulate themselves upon the fact ibaj; that borough was so free from political woliganiem th-ait dkv were able to hold meet- ings to discuss the buraireg poetical quaestioras, and ho thought that it was a credit ito the bo-rough. He himself felt proud to belong to a borough wihach showed such a hagh oaxier of intelligence, th-a. they did not have to report to any "barracking" methods to support their political opinions. Mr Austin JCln, who was aooorded an enthusiastic reception, said that a Radical news- paper had that it was uctiiikoly thiat he wv-iuld bo nominated. He been nominated, and meant to atay there and ftgtat uantil the contest was over ('hear, hear). Proceedling to deal with the Hc-u o of Lords question, Mr Jones they ought .to have a scheme which would govern the country accordiir.tg to the will of the people—(hoar, hear)—and net a. scheme which would send back a House off Commons for five years to pass any thing they liked, wit.ho-U'fc tho per.ple having a clianee to eay whether they li!k.ed it or not (cheers). He had ob erved tih-at a. local paper had devoted some of its columns to comments uipcn hiis pctor self. The paper said t11<ùt he had come forward as a ch.mp'.on of the pMtiY which always ioipipreseed tho poor, and never did amytlÙlilg" for d'ainor cracv ("Shame!"). What was the rooordi of the Tory party in that respeeii? Who had pufijed the Trade Unionism Act in 18767 Mr Gladstone brought in a Trades Unionism Act after the general election in 1874, and the whole Labour party opposed Mr Gladstone's Bill. The Conservatives passed a Trades Unifon Bill in 1876, notwithstanding the opposition of Mr Colxfon and- Mr Bright. Those gentlemen did net like Trades Unionism, as with cheap food and cheap raw lliwterinl tihey oouki give the workman a lower wage. They had pojed as friends of the people, but whem it .had' come to giving the working-men a chance to combine and demand a higher wage, they ceased to be- Iricitidis of the peopie. Trades Unionism might be abused, and he was sorry to say they were abusing it in South Wales at preeeent, but, after ail, it had been of great benefit to the work- ing men of this country in securing for ihefcn a decent liviin-g wage, to which they were entitled (cheers). Another point which their Free Trade friends did not like was the Factory Act. They liked to work women and girls for lbng hours at smaJl pay, yet they were catied1 the de-mocnaieic amd jieople's party (laughter). It was iin 1897 that the Conservative Party passed a Factory Act limiting the number of wiurkin-g hours of those girls and women to abouit ten hours per day (near, hear). That was done in the teeth of the Liberal opposition- (checre) This party, who called them-elves the people's friends, took credit for the Workmen's Com- pensation Act. They told them they passed that, but it was passed by that GREAT STATESMAN, MR CHAMBERLAIN (cheers). He (thought they would now a&reie that the Conservative party had done a. groat deal for the workwug man (hear, hear). The Liberals said that the proposals of the Conserva- tive party were gcbd for the rich and bad for the poor, but he contended that the policy c-i the Liberal party was to the voice of the people, whilst that of the Conservative party was to let the people use their voice (hear, i'jear). The Conservative party did not say that a man had the right to govern because he was the son. of his father. They were goimg to modify to a great extent (the hereditary princi- ple (cheers). They were going to establish machinery which would prevent a chance majority in the of Cbmmoais from foist- ing Q<:1 to the country legislation which it wab not clear the people wanted. Mr Jones went on to explain the proposals for reform of the ilouse of Lords, and pointed' out thc.it under tlic Radical system the Irish Home Rule Bill would be passed over the head> of the Second Cham- ber and the will <of the people, whilst under ihe Tory system it would not be passed until tho people had stated in black md white that they wanted i.t (cheers). Tariff Reform be su-bmidted to a referendum. The prev.ws day he received a deputation of ladies with re- gard to the Women's Suffrage question. They non-militant—he took care fb find that out before hand (laughter). There wero some electors who were in sympathy with tn? ladies, and who wicuid give their votes a candidate who was in favour of the suffrtje. No nic could say that the Liberal Gove-ami-int, if they went back, would have a mandate for Women's .Suffrage, any mere than (the Conservatives would have a mandate for Tariff Reform, but, according to tiie Tory party s pi-apiv^s. Women's Suffrage wo.uld be a subject cif the referendum, the same as other important mea- sures (hear, hear1). HOME RULE. There was a very great danger t.hat, if the Liberal party went back and their veto ■ evolutions they would pass an Irish Homo Rule iiill. The first tiling t'hey might do was tcrf raise their salaries, and decide, perhaps, that every member of Parliament sv.^u-ld rcceirc £2000 per annum. After that they would wring in an Irish Hotoe Rule Bill because they were pledged to it. Wheni the House of Lords Jirtnv out tlie Budgeii, there was a general election, and so popular was the Budget that Go-vernnient lost 104 seats (laughter and cheers). After that they returned to office, but no Budget was presented when the eod of the financial year was reached, and irt never appeared until April 20th. rFhey could not pats she Budget until they had squared the Irish (hear, hear). They were absolutely dependent ■jn the Irish for a working majority., and the irish did not like the Budget (hear, heat). If j any of the Irish statesmen'—Mr John Redmond, Mr Healy, and Mr Dillon—allied themselves to any particular party i hero wa., nç(.; &111 office which would not 00 within their grasp. Mr Redmond had Jet the cat ouit of the b3 by ibdmluting that all he wanted was Home itule, and to get that they would vote for the Budget, aithouigh they .oathed it (laughter and cheers). Home Italia would not be good for Ireland, becaroBO the country was tb.) poor to provide the money which was wanted for the land pui-chnao scheme and Old Age Pensions, and which was at present supplied by England (hear, hear). Home Rule vvould be the cause of frict on, and there might .)0 civil war in Ireland on account of the bitter feud which existed between the Protestants and the Roman Catholics over there. The Orange- men would not submit to the Catholics, and the men of Ulster, which was the most successful and flourishing part of Ireland, had said that they would rather fight to the last than submit to Catholic rule (hear, hear). The proper way to deal with Ireland was that proposed by Mr Q'Brien, for thero was nothing which had killed the desire for Home Rule in Inland so much as the Land Purchase scheme (hear, hear), which was initiated and given by a Conservative Gov- vernment (cheers). It was only natural that if a farmer held his farm under a big landlord lie would get it at a more reasonable rental than he would under the small absentee landlord, who had a business in Liverpool or Manchester, and who only bought the land as an investment (hear, hear). It was a scheme which was taking in Iro land, and the Irish tenant was very much in favour of it (cheers). If it was allowed to go on it would kill the desire for Home Rule in Ireland, for the farmer had never got a bit of land from the Home Ruler, but he had got it from the Conservative party (bear, hear). Under that scheme they would see at last an Ireland that was peaceful and at rest from end to end (ioud cheers). COLONIAL PREFERENCE. He had not dealt much as yet during his cam- paign with the question of Colonial Preference. It was a very difficult question, because it was said that it involved the taxing of foods, but in reality it was their Free Trade Government that taxed food (hear, hear). If they taxed commo- dities coming into that country which thfcy could not produce themselves they paid every penny of the tax, but if they taxed commodities which they could produce themselves the tax was paid by the producer. The Tariff Reformers were not going to put a farthing tax on wheat which was imported from the Colonies, but only on foreign wheat. The only way to get a large untaxed supply was to get it from the Colonics. If satis- fied that they could get a better market hero than the Russian the Colonies would cultivate a larger portion of land and send in a larger sup- ply, and tho larger that supply was the smaller would be thQ supply al the taxed food which they would consume (cheers). Let them only give Canada a fair chance to cultivate the large area of whoat-growing land and they would get so much other food supplies from Australia and India that the price of bread could not be sent up (hear, hear). They would be able to get sufficient revenue from the taxes on manufac- tured goods to allow them to remove the tax on tea and sugar. Would that be increasing the burden of the working man? (cries of "No, no !") The Colonies had been making the offer of Colo- nial Preference ever since the year 1843. They had been giving British gcods a preference with- out getting anything in return. It was in 1897 that Canada had given their trade a preference. Before 1897 their trade with Canada had dc- creased from six million pounds to five million, but after the preference had been given it had gone up from five million pounds to seventeen millions (chcers). If the. Colonies would keep on offering them a preference and giving (hem the preference mentioned he would advise the people of this country to stop as they were at present. But would they continue for ever to offer the preference? The policy of Mr Winston Churchill was to bolt and bar the door in the faces of the Colonies, but Frenchmen had offered them terms because Britain would not. Although the Mother Country would not offer a preference, tlvre was not a country in the world which would not do so. France, Germany, America, Austria, Russia, all were willing to give them terms. He believed that they were about to have their last chance. There would be antther CoIcnial Conference next year, and again the Colonial Prime Ministers would come and make the- offer, and it would be a question of take it cr leave it (hear, hear), for there were other co mtries who wore simply dying to enter into preferential terms with the Colonies. If a. Liberal Governrftent went back again they would Egain bolt and bar the door in the face of Colo- nial Preference, but it was the duty of the elec- tors to prevent their going back, and to support. that great Imperial policy which would bind their Empire more securely together (cheers). Our country was only a little island, and if wet stood by ourselves it wculd not be very difficult for ambitious European nations to do vs a great deal of harm; but as it nvas all the Colonies stood at our back (hear, hear) as they had^"dur- ing the South African War (cheers). But if we refused the Colonial offer and allowed them to enter into commercial treaties with othet coun- tries, the sentimental feeling would getweakêt .¡f\

---LIBERAL MEETING AT CONWAY.

MAYOR OF CARMARVONS APPEAL.

FLINT BOROUGHS.

GORONWY OWEN'S BIRTH PLACE.…

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MR LLOYD GEORGE

A ROYAL APPOINTMENT. --

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GORONWY OWEN'S BIRTH PLACE.…

MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY.