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.._------I . I 1 J MELTON…

--- -----------MERSOreETHSHlRE.

TALYCAFN MART.

THE CARNARYONBOROUGHS.

MR AUSTIN JONES AT CARNARVON.

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MR AUSTIN JONES AT CARNARVON. After addressing his workers at the Con- servative Club early in the week, Mr Austin Jones attended his first public meeting at Carnarvon on Friday night. The Guild Haiti was crowded on th-e occasion. The Liberal was very much dn evidence, but many avowed opponents of the Conservative and liis cause were afterwards forced to admit that they had been most agreeably impressed bv his ability and urbanity, and probably the best proof of this, after all, was the keen attention paid to Mr Jones as he developed some of his arguments. Alderman Rioha-rd Thomas (chairman of the Boroughs Execu- tive) presided, and he was supported Oll the platform by the candidate, SLr H. J. Elbs- Naiiney, Bart., R. T. Jones (Ola-n- og wen), Mr W. Llovd Griffith (the Conserva- tive agentV, Mr M. E. Nee, Mr Welch, etc. The CHAIRMAN observed that the country had been thrown into the turmoil of a General Election at present without rhyme or reason, and i.f the Liberals were to return to power there would be Homo Rule for Ire- land, which would l-e-ad to a dismemberment of the Empire. The Conservatives of that constituency were called upon to support the candidature of Mr Austin Jones—(loud chcers) -and as the battle was one of principles and not persons neither Mr Jones nor his sup- porters intended to say anything of a per- sonal character about anyone at that meet- ing (hear, hear). All that was asked for was fair-play to say before he ekctoxs a; fairly and as justly as possible the vie we which they held, and this, he thought, they "Were entitled to (cheers). MR AUSTIN JONES, who was oordially re- ceived, prefaced his spe-ech by observing that some persons to whom he talked before he came to the constituency had done a great injustice to the people of Carnarvon Boroughs. Some of them warned him that the reception he would get would be any- thing but favourable, and in fact went eo far is almost to recommend him not to come tiiere at a.Ll. However, he had pleasure in seeing a great number of voters of that con- stituency. From his friends he had received the utmost cordiality, and from tli-osc who dissented from his views he had received the most courteous treatment that any man couJd desire (cheers). He b-ad also addressed pevera.1 meetings, at each of which the same lair tr-eatme-nt had been extended to him. Proceeding, he said this was a time of great constitutional crisis. Mere abuse of the House of Lords would not carry the electors very far. They must argue whether the Houee was good or bad. If it was bad, as tie Radical Party always reminded them, the sooner the Liords were cleared out the better (cheers). That, however, was the very last thing that the Radical Party would dream of doing. They did not propose to clear them out, though they described them as lunatic and incompetent (laughtoe-r and ch-cers), Only last year, no fewer than ten Liberal gentle- men sacrificed their position as democrats in order to enter that disgraceful assembly. If those gentlemen, or their sons, were to change their politics after entering the House of Lords, it would not be the fault of the Tory Party. Presumably those who voted for iiis opponent at the last election voted for him as a Li be-a! and not as a Soci alist— (cheers')—and if lie were IL-o return a.s a ^Radical, and introduced a Socialistic measure, what would happen under present conditions "W3iS that the House of Lords would rightly deem it their duty not to pass such a Ball, -until the constituencies had declared that they required it (cheers). A Voice: "The House of Lords must throw it out three times. Mr Jones rejoined that the gentleman should have added that the third time the House 01 Lords would have to pass it whether they wanted it or not (ehcers, and a voice, "Quite right"). That was the sort of veto they were SO proud of. The true object of a veto, how- ever, was to enable the Second Chamber to keep back a measure until the country de- clared that it wanted it (hear, hear). But the Veto Bill gave no opportunity of re- ferring questions to the country, and for that reason it was not worth the paper it was Written on. The candidate afterwards dealt at length wjth the proposals for reforming the House of Lords, which reform, with the assistance of the referendum, would ensure a government by the people f.o. the people. Mr Balfour had given a pledge that the question of "Tariff Reform" shouid be TCfer-rcd to the country. (A Voice: Mr Balfour promised only to submit the principle and not the measure (cheeps). The Candidate said ho ooufd not see the difference be- tween the two. If they introduced the measure they must introduce the principle. Mr Jones proceeding, 5a,d the compla.int made against tic last Conservative Government was that they pot into power on the pretence that they wanted to go oack to terminate the South African War. and that they afterwards brought in an unj-vst Education Bill. The Liberal Party were ic- turned to power in 1906, and they broughi in the land clauses in the Budget which were rjL in their proposals. If the Conservative Party went into power at this election they would ur back on various issues. The REV. R. T. JONES followed with a rousing speech in Welsh on the question of Dis- establishment. He dwelt more particularly with the attempt made to misappropirate the endow- ments of the Church, and the resultant dangc of the property of every other religious body being confiscated in the same manner. He severely crit eised the action of the House of Commons in preparing to legislate upon th, Church question before they had even received the report of the Roval Commission appointed by themselves to inquire specifically cnto the I state of the religious bodies in the Principality toheers). That report would clearly show whether the Church occupied the position of numerical inferiority attributed to it by its enemies The speaker added that he was perfectly willing to allow the question of Disestablishment and J)í') 6e's is endowment to be settled by the Referendum telicers). A speech on Tariff Reform was also delivered by MR WELCH. The Chairman and the speakers were oordial'v thanked on the motion of SIR H. J. ELLIS- KANNEY, Bart.

MR AUSTIN JONES AND THE WORKENGMEisi.

MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY.

---LIBERAL MEETING AT CONWAY.

MAYOR OF CARMARVONS APPEAL.

FLINT BOROUGHS.

GORONWY OWEN'S BIRTH PLACE.…

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MR LLOYD GEORGE

A ROYAL APPOINTMENT. --

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GORONWY OWEN'S BIRTH PLACE.…

MR AUSTIN JONES AT DEGANWY.