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.--CHURCH DEFENCE MEETING…

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ICARNARVON BOROUGHS.

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CARNARVON BOROUGHS. (Continuation from 9th page.) MR HERBERT LEWIS AT D £ GMWY. "WRECKED" LIBERAL MEASURES. Alderman A. Nether wood presided over a well- attenxiod Liberal moe-tinig hoid at the' Pcniel C.M. Chapel, De-gar, wy, yesterday (Wednesday) cveiling, when Mr J. Herbert Lewis, M.P. de- li \eiod 3Jl dL.I'2: Mr Lewie dealt at. groat longth with tho House of Lods question. Ho said that the majority, \\L<h iie confidently predicted the Liberal Party were going to s'un—(hear,, h-)- w';13£oin:; to have a remarkable cf1.çct on tho coiiiiitry (cheers). The ci tdie Govern- ment would be decided upon according to tnat majority (hear, hear). The Liberal Government irad during tne. tonm of office done the best they possibly under the eirouinsita«noee for tho people—(hear, hear),—and no otlietr Govern- ment had ever aitompfced so much scoial work. I "i --vy wouJd Lave aoi.einvplisifcd a great deal more if tLeir hands had boem free—(hoar, near), and they intended in the future, with the co-opera- tion of tho worker and the e.-nployer, to do RHiKtiling at any rate to solve erne of thess ter- rible pioblema which a blsgfating cihadew upon human life (cheers). Who was the 'man that was going to do it? Tne man who that dfcy asked tor, a:nd was going to receive in over-* v, mumburs their suffrage at the polls in. the Carnarvon Boroughs (loud cheers). Refer- r.ng to the Budget, Sir Lewis said that with all due respect to preceding Chancellors of the Exchequer—and their liimcs stood out brilliant- ly in the role of Engheih Statesmen—the great- est and ffiCtet beneficent Bxidget of all was toai oi Mr Lloyd George (hear, hear). The presant election was more or fc«8 a fight for fairplay between one citizen and anotiior. The verdict oi the election of 1906 was as emphatic a verdict as any people ever recorded at the polls. The greater part of the first session had been devoted to the Education Bill. It had been carried in the Housa oi and then sent up to tihe Lords who represented nobody but tho.neelvej. lie well remembered hovV 46-very member in. tihe House h-ad hung, as it were, upon the lips of Mr Balfour, and' then they (had heard him pronounce the doom of that Education Bill. From the lips of no-irly every member in the House had buret the one word!, "Wrecked." The House of Lords had ricked the work of the eettion, and defied the House of Cammeais. They v, e--o then told that if they did not like it they c-o-uld go to the country and have another General Election. Then the same -tiling 'had happened with the Licensing Bill. Mr Balfour, however, was able to take his own Bills through as easily as if they were run on oil castors, not- withstanding the fact that his Bills related to similar matters as those of the Liberals, namely, Licensing and Education. What they wanted was to do away with the Veto, and not form the House of Lords. Lord Hæbery was a "Daniel brought to judgment," for he had been speaking, v.hen he was Liberal Prime Minis- let-, against jefcrming the Second Chamber, and was then in favour of abolishing the Veto alto- gethor. Mr Balfoun had given them a peldgo with regard to Tariff Reform being submitted to a Referendum. The pledge was made on tho eve of a general election. He wcii remembered bong in the House cf Commons in May, 1905, when Mr Balfour wa.s asked the question: "Is not the hon. member bound by the terms of his Edinburgh speech?" That was in connection with the Colonial Conference, and Mr Balfour's reply had been "No, sir!" Had thQY over- heard anything more rcmaikuble (cries of No! no! and laughter). They knew what value to attach to the pledge. The "Morning Post" had advised candidates to make the utmost use of the pledge before the election, and afterwaids the matter oould be con- s,ideredin all its bearings (laughter). They had had the remarkable spectacle of seeing news- papers actually quarrelling with one another openly, and under the very eyes of the voters, whom they wore supposed to instruct as to whether it was right to give a pledge of that kind cr not, and as to the probability c; its being carried out. Many Tariff Reform candidates told theum that it was not going to be carried out at all. He iippcaied not only to Liberals, but to all fair minded people, to vote for fairplay at the forthcoming election (hear, hear). They wanted no advantage, no privilege, no concession. He wanted them to reward the distinguished services of the great statesman who honoured the Car- narvon Boroughs by representing them in Parlia- ment (hear, hear). On the one hand, justee and fan-play, on the other gratitude and admiration. He appealed to them at that election, which was going to be an historic election, to do more for Mr Lloyd George than they had done before (hear, hear). After all, when he and everyone in that room, wodd long have become dust, there would still remain in the history of the nation the glory otf Mr Lloyd George's constituency, tho glory of a constituency which was faithful to Lloyd George from beginning to end (loud cheers). A resolution of confidence in Mr Lloyd George and the Government was carried.

DENBIGH BOKOUGHS.

FLINT BOROUGHS.

EAST DENBIGHSHIRE.

!FOOTBALL! FOOTBALL! t

RUTHIN TOWN COUNCIL.

--_-____--_--EUTHIN RURAL…

ABERGELE & PENSARN.

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HOLYHEAD.

CAERHUN.

~DENBIGH7~

DOLWYDDELEN.

GLAN CONWAY.

LLANBEDR

LLANGELYNIN.

LLANDUDNO JUNCTION.

BETTWSYCOED.

CONWAY.~

LLANRWST.

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