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FOOTB A LL! FOOTB ALL'!.

1 DENBIGHSHIRE AND THE NATIONAL…

UNNECESSARY DISEASE OF CONSUMPTION.

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CLERGY SUSTENTATION AND PENSIONS.

CLERGY PENSIONS.

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COLWYN CHEMIST GUARANTEES…

GElRIONYDD RURAL DISTRICT…

YALE OF CONWAY NOTES.

FOOTBALL 1 FOOTBALL'!

) DENBIGHSHIRE TEMPEli* ANCE…

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CLERGY SUSTENTATION AND PENSIONS.

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Caurch was to maintain the highest standard of efficiency they must have an efficient ministry. If they were to maintain the Church's suprcmacy 111 religious thought they must maintain the living agent. In order to do the work that was needed they must have the man. It was useless having fine churches and vicarages, and comfort- able mission rooms and schools if they lacked the men. Dealing with the question as to why the Church was not receiving of the best. the speaker said the clergyman was ridiculed in plays, in the home, and in books, and voung men when they saw that sort of thing going on did not like to respond to the call. He asked parents and all interested in Church work to lose no opportunity of giving to the minislrv that high place to which it was entitled, and which it had received in days past. While the question of clergy pensions affected the whole subject in every phrase, yet money had never been the goal wmch had brought the best men into the ministry. It was necessary that they should have efficient service in the Church, but what prospects were held out to the best to enter the iii-ii;-try, Was it right that after a man had been induced to join the Church, and had given the best vears of li s life that he should see no Drospccts fcr his old age. If a man knew that when he was infirm or old he could retire on a pension mat- ters might be different. Many men realised that they should retire, and that it was in the best interests of the Church that they should do so. but to many retirement meant practically starva- tion. There were talks of compulsory retirement, but it was useless to speak of that without pro- viding the means. Once pensions were estab- lished they could be used as a lever in the hands of Churchmen to bring about efficient service. It might be said that some men would not go even though they had a pension. That he was prepared to leave to public opinion. Tlie speaker then referred to tile work of the Clergy Pension Association and to the Ecclesiastical Insurance Office, anf said that pensions were provided out of the available funds at the disposal of the committee, and it was upon the basis pet up by the office that the Archbishops' Committee had worked. The Ecclesiastical Insurance Office had already distributed £ 97,COD in the work of the Church, and he claimed that whatever Church insurance there, was should go through that office, which was not in competition with env- oi her commercial concern. It had a prior claim upon Churchmen, as the larger measure of sup- port it received the larger share of help it could give the Church. Trey had to maintain and continue an efficient ministry, was every- thing. J In proposing a vote of thanks to the speakers, I Mr R. M. Hugh Jones said he hoped that addi- tional interest would be taken in the society after that meeting, and added that if every communi- cant in Rhyl gave Is per annum £ 70 per annum would be handed over to the socie'y. Col. Heaton seconded, and urged that matters of that sort should be done by individuals and not by corporate bodies. The larger number of small contributions received the greater would be interest. The vote of thanks having been carried, Mr Brodrick moved "a vote of thanks to Archdeacon Lloyd for presiding. At the close of tlie meeting Mr and Mrs Brodrick entertained the comprny to tea.