Hide Articles List

19 articles on this Page

Advertising

BRIDGEND DIFFICULTY SOLVED.

[No title]

Advertising

------..---_-_--.--MR. D.…

THE HONOURS LIST. 4

AMATEUR GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP.…

---------------._-------------.__-0…

Advertising

[No title]

Advertising

HINTS FOR THE HOME.

Advertising

- --LOCAL GOSSIP.

__----_-----STITCH IN TIME.

- BRIDGEND POLICE COURT. .

[No title]

AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

ITHE GARDENING.

News
Cite
Share

THE GARDENING. VEGETABLES AND FSU1T. The thinning-out -of spring-sown Onions should fee completed at oneo, the amount <A thinning depending, of course, on the size bulbs xequired, hour to eix inches apart is a very good average distance, but, if a heavj crop of medium-sized tubers -is desired, than thoy may be lefts considerably closer. Pick- ing Onions, sown a month or so ago, may be lliinned out a, litllo it necessary, but these micceed bettor Avhen left farirly close, as large tabers are not wanted. Onicyns planted out in the spring must be hoed between occa- sionally, to free them from weeds, but keep the soil around them firm. Frame Cucumbers, although bearing fruit, ma&t be constantly encouraged to form snc- cessional vigorous young shoots, because upon them alone can reliance bo placed to give suecessional fruits. When such shoots ap- proach. the sitLs of the frame stop tuem, to induce them to form fruiting laterals. Once a week will be often enough to give real root Arstemigs, though the plants are best sprinkled overhead about 4 p.m. each bright afternoon before shutting tne sa:,ims down apjite close. Tomato plants are gross feeders, and re- quire mueh nourishment, and this can be sup- plied, to a large extent, by surface mulching 3r top-dressing. Loose pieces of boards, tries, or slates should be fixed just inside the pots or boxes, so as to deepen them, then the mix- ture ef lumpy loam and rotted manure, or the formar and a small quantity of super- phosphate—three ounces to one bushel of phosphate—three ounces to one bushel of soil—should be put on, and made moderately firm. It is best to begiw eerly, giving light top-doeesinss frequently, then the plants will bring to perfection a good CW) of fruit. Too often feeding, and especially the top-dress- ingH, are put off until late in the season. In such cases the fruits that are Get fail to SAVOII to the normal size. Strong dosea of manure water, or artificials, must never be mvem MULCHING FRLTT-TI?EES. A mulch saves labour in watering by con- serving moisture in the soil du:l u; prolonged dry periods. In light shallow soils tne mulch is beneficial to fruit-trees in preventing burn- ing of the root-fibres near the surface. These minute hair-like roots are Km true feeders; on them the sound health, of the plants and the quantity and quality of th-e crop mainly depend. It pays, therefore, to end oh early, especially in soils that are liable to suffer from spell 3 of drought. Trees growing in from spelL of drought. Trees growing in heavy retentive land al: • benefit from the practice. It eaeourag.s the. xornvytiou of those important fihrot.o rot.; r.t the surface instead of a.t greater deoth^ AY he re the tem- perature is less .1 ami stimulating and consequently lest; thivoeteMe to the fruit." The mulch should be open and porous, springy underfoot. ralhtr "than solid. Farmyard manure when procurable is t > he 73referred. Partially decayed leavas. spent hops, litter of any sort, may be used if it contains little or nothing of nntritiv-e quality. This can be supplied by dressing the surfaeo before laying on the mulch with guano err any other of the durable commercial manures. Prick the surface that is to he mulched with a fork lightly before applying the dressing, a.nd if the soil is dry give a good soaking of water irmnadiately after,, and by on the mulch Ike following day. IN THE FLOWER GARDEN. Lavender succe2;,L be-t OIl a dry, warm aspect and soil, aad this should bo taken into account by all who would grow it in hedge or other forms in gardens. It will, ho AY ever, succeed well im ordinary garden soils, in a warm, sunny aspect. Cuttings of large pieces of the plants dibbered firmly ;nto sandy loam, either in early spring or autumn, root readily and form plants. But the better method of propagation is to form small cutt- ings from the young shoots in early spring, and dibber them under a hand-glass. From these two to three feet high hedges in gardens can be formed. The Tuberous Begonia lias lately been de- veloped into a kind with long thin drooping stems clothed with elegant narrow foliage and bearing large. pendent clusters of narrow- stalled flowers. They are suitable for culti- vation in hanging baskets in conservatories and greenhouses, as they form Avell furnished speeimens and flower freely throughout^ the summer. They are easily propagated either from stem cuttings or leaves, and they arc said also to come fairly true from seeds. The best kind of basket for them is the half sphere made of stout wire, and it should be lined with moss before the soil and plants are set in it. To obtain large specimens in a short time four or fine plants should be set in a basket lOin. or so across. There is scarcely a garden anywhere in which Pinks cannot be grown. They do not thrive so well in a light sandy soil as in a good sandy loam, because it is too open, and a soil that is firm about the roots is better than a loose one. The plants should be put in the border in early autumn, the soil being pressed firmly round the roots to hold them in security during the winter. Should they become too large, they can be lifted and divided, and it will be found that the divided pieces possess roots. The plants are usually propagated by means of cuttings or pipings, struck during the early part of July. Large growers root their cutting-* in a gentle bottom heat, but they ca.n be rooted in the open air ouite well. They may be put in just beneath the shade of some of the border plants, for it it requisite that the cuttings should be shaded from the sun. The Pink, with its grey-green foliage, makes a, very good edging plant. It may be supposed that there are very' few possibilities for those who attempt to grow plants on a roof, but there are many, and much decorative beauty can be obtained. Failures are generally due to insulFieiently- dstiined tubs, boxes, barrels, and pots, to in- sufficient water, or to cultivating unsuitable subjects. Barrels should have several round holes bored in their sides, a, foot or more from the ground, as well as plenty of holes in their bases; fibrous nmsseig of loam should be placed against the side holes, for the water to filter through, and the basal holes should each have a concave piece of crock laid over. Over the crocks there should be four inches depth of pebble stones in barrels, two inches in lower tubs, a.nd an inch at least in big pots or shalloAv boxes. The soil used should be SAveet turf loam, with some leaf-mould and old manure; if this is mixed with a fourth portion made up of river sand and brick rub- ble it will suffice for the needs of vegetation, and will keep aweet for sc long time A NOTE ON WINDOW BOXES. Evaporation from window boxos in dry weather is extraordinarily rapid, and plants will look miserable if neglected. Water may be needed twice a day. Rich soil, too, and a covering of moss or Cocoanut fibre on the sur- face, will be desirable to keep them cool; but, of course, in a hot, sunny exposure it is necessary to choose the right plants, i.e., these which do not need shade. For a south Avindow-box in summer. Ivy-leaved and other Geraniums, blue Lobelia, Petunias. Helio- trope, and white Marguerites will stand better than most other things. For a position which is rather shaded, tuberous Begonias, hanging Fuchsias (old plants cut down in spring, and then repotted), and Campanulas garg,1nica and fragilis also drooping over the box are betst chosen. Climbing plants can be planted a-t either end of the box, and trained by means of string stretched on large nails to form an arch over the window, with very good effect; and a wire basket can be hung from the central nail above the window (well-lined with moss), to a specimen plant of a drooping nature. White or pink Hydrangeas look well in AvindoAv-boxes, but they are amongst the most thirsty of plants, and should have an abundance of tepid morning and evening, Avith a dose of liquid manure, or soot-Avater, in a clear, thin state, twice a week. All peat-loving plants such as Azaleas, Rhododendrons, Camellias, and other shrubs, Heaths, &c., need much Avaiei in summer.