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BRIDGEND DIFFICULTY SOLVED.

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------..---_-_--.--MR. D.…

THE HONOURS LIST. 4

AMATEUR GOLF CHAMPIONSHIP.…

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HINTS FOR THE HOME.

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- --LOCAL GOSSIP.

__----_-----STITCH IN TIME.

- BRIDGEND POLICE COURT. .

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES. BY A PRACTICAL FARMER. FOR POULTRY PRODUCERS. It Avould be pily to the opportsadty o.fered by the recent annual meeting of the National Poultry Organisation Society of again calling attention, to the splendid oppor- tunities Avhich a Aval t tha home producer of eggs and poultry. Last year the reduction in eggs imported from other countries amounted to 16,000 tons, as compared with 1908, while iu the same period the supply of poultry de- clined in value by the value of the 10,000 tons of eggs increased by upwards of £5CÙ. That is to say, the price of eggs has gone up. the demand for eggs is increasing, and foreign countries are unable to meet the demand owing to their own requirements. Lady Salisbury has long actively interested herself in the movement for encouraging and developing the production of poultry and eggs in the United Kingdom and of bringing producers, through the medium o-f local affiliated societies, into more direct commu- nication with retailers by the establishment of co-operative depots, and bv arranging with the trade for the sale of produce. She is now so satisfied with the measure of success which has attended the movement that sine has set about endeavouring to raise a sum of £ 2,000 in order to provide for all future contingen- cies in carrying: on the work of the society. Earl C'arrington, President of the Board of Trade. has publicly expressed his interest in the work of the Poultry Organisation Society, and thv promoters are hopeful that lie may give it a share of the new Development Grant. EDUCATIONAL EXHIBITS AT SHOWS. Those who visit the leading shows of the country may have noticed that educational exhibits are now becoming an indispensable feature. At a number of the slwws there is a stand or office for the Beard of Agriculture, where in form a ti OR is readily given. The most complete educational exhibit was, of course, at the Royal Show, but at many of the smaller meetings this feature is bag àe- veloped. Very instructive exhibits have been made by the agricultural oolleges, experiment stations, and other institutions, and experts were in attendance to give information. The exhibits are varied. Some of the most useful are the living and mounted speeimens of in- sect ptsts of farm aad orchard crops. From such exhibits a grower caa often identify some enemy Avhich ha« been attacking his crops, and which formerly he irnd been un- able to recognise. In the same way trouble- able to recognise. In the same way trouble- some Avaedss oan be identified from dried specimens and illustrations. Experimental work is also made to furnish interesting ex- hibits. Results of mammal trials on grass land are never ao eonvincing as when shown by curves cut from the actual experiment plots, and pot culture experiments often throw much light ON the manuring vf dif- ferent kinds of soil. Preserved speeimens of many pests and diseases that attack farm animals can also be seen, and exhibits dem-ca- strating the nutritive properties of various feeding stuffs never fail to attract a deal of interest. • A SUPPLEMENT ON WHEAT. I often wonder how many of my renders ever see the Journal of the Board of Agricul- ture, which costs fourpence a month post free, and sometimes, as the cwrreat nuruiier does, includes a special supplement Aviihaut extra cost. I can assure those who de not see it that tiiev are missing some very good and instructive reading, as well aa the chantH-s that a, smart man needs of watching the way various markets are going. Agriculture has become so much a world affair that no man can afford to shut his eyes t$ what is going on in other countries. Not only he want to know son:< thing of the progress of agricultural sciencfe, so that lie may be among the first to avail himself of new opportunities, but he must have some means of ascertaining whether certain crops or classes of live stock are being produced in increasing or desreas- ing quantities likely to affect the general tread of prices. Those farmers who did not notice the enormous expansion of the wheat area during the last twenty yea.rs or so and the consequent cheapening of supplies, by not turning their attention to other crops have in most cases suffered heavily. It is calcu- lated that in the last twelve years the total wheat production of the world has increased by one-third. The result of that, in long- settled countries, id, th&t wheat has fallen from its premier position. Yet it is certain that this expansion of the wheat area cannot go on indefinitely, and if the world's popula- tion continues to grow we shall have to pro- duce Avheat that will thrive in soils and climates unfavourable to existing kinds, and probably intensify the yield. Fortunately, the Mendelian laws of breeding have now proved their wonderful value to agricultural science, and with tbeir aid plant breeders hope to be able to produce varieties that will be suited to every kind of local requirement. In Britain, strong wheats of high yield and stiff straw are wanted to make production of the crop attractively profitable. In South Africa and India the cultivation of wheat is seriously hindered by the prevalence of rust. Science proposes to deal with the difficulty by producing varieties which are immune or almost immune to the disease. This has ac- tually been done in the experiments of Pro- fessor Biffen. The wheat belt cannot be ex- tended northwards owing to harvest- frosts. If the process of maturation can be hastened only a few days, millions of acres might be made suitable for wheat. If wheat can be grown with narrower leaves, transpiration would be checked a. little, and so on dry soils a much heavier crop than luvs hitherto been possible could be raised. These and many other similar problems connected with wheat were discussed by leading authorities at the meeting of the British Association at Winni- peg last year, and all of importance that was Said has been collected into the supplement to which I ha, ve referred. The subject closely concerns the British farmer, for it is not be- yond the limits of probability that wheat may, in course of time, again find a very pro- minent place in the agriculture of these islands. COLOURING SHEEP Jrn. SHOWS. For longer years than anyone is able to re- member sheep have been coloured or other- wise prepared for shows. In the last few years the practice has found marked dis- favour among certain buyers, and some I exhibitors have discontinued it. Shropshires II are generally shown unprepared, and South- doAvns and Oxford Downs often so, but others still appear coloured or oiled with never- failing regularity. The question has agitated the minds of sheep breeders for some time past, and societies haAe more than once been appealed to to prohibit the use of colouring materials and oils. So far no steps have been taken. The object of the practice ir. to neutralise the disadvantages of certain soils and localities upon the appearance of the fleece. Beyond a natural and legitimate desire to present his sheep to the best ad- vantage the flockmaster has no object to serve in using ochre or oils, and it is difficult to believe that anyone can be really misled in his estimate of a sheep by the colour of the fleece. The form of the animal is unaltered, the head and the features remain as before, and even the quality of the wool and the colour of the skin undergo no change. But the practice is objeotionable for the handling of the animal: In this respect the oil on some of the LongAvoolg is more offensive than the ochre on the Down sheep, but in cither case many refrain from subjecting the animals to I a close inspection on account of the conse- quences to their clothes and hands. A writer in the Tunes suggests that it is a, wise prin- ciple to impose upon exhibitors as few re- strictions as possible. At different times efforts have been made to regulate shearing, trimming, and so forth, but the results have not been satisfactory, and within general limits the societies are perhaps well advised in allowing exhibitors and buyers to adjust their differences. If the colouring and oiling of sheep are detrimental to buyers the remedy is simple. It has been said that more than I one buyer has chosen unooloured sheep simply because of their natural appearance. If this example is followed, ochre and oils will soon I cease to play a proraiaent part in the prepara- tion of show sheep.

ITHE GARDENING.