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Jftacstqj (Samite. __--------__--__-=-

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THE EISTEDDFOD FIASCO.

MAESTEG PASTOR HONOURED. ._------

SCENE AT A MAESTEG SCHOOL…

RIDER FORGETS INSTRUCTIONS.…

I I A REVIEW, ...

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I I A REVIEW, "THE RENAISSANCE AND WELSH LITERATURE," Being a Review of Some of the "e.L-il CUs~ics in the Light of tne Humanistic Movement. By the REV. WM. MEREDITH MopEis. B.A., F.R. Hist. S., and Member of the Society of Arts. This is the third important work which the Rev. Morris has L issued from the prers since he has bee-TI in Maeste-g. In 190-1 was published his standard work on the "History of the British Violin." published by Chatto and Windus, ::0, 10s. 6d. volume, for which Her Majesty the Queen thanked the author for his material service to a, much neglected art. In 1906. he published an account, of the life of a celebrated mcde-rn violin maker, with numerous illustrations—-Walter H. Mayo-en, of Manchester, "As an appreciation." says th3 author. of the life and work of a. good mar. and a great TtJst, This book appears to have been, sold out. for the dealers- in works of this class have already put. a price on the copies they have captured considerably above that at which it was supplied to subscribers. Last, but not least, is Mr. Morris's product, which is just out. of the binder's hands, in a handsomely bound volume; price I 650.. THE RENAISSANCE OF WELSH LITERATURE. This. i" a survey of some of the. Welsh Classics, in the light of the great humanistic I movement of the sixteenth and seventeenth, centuries. The line of thought adopted." the author 3ays in the preface, "starts from the assump- tion that in. investigating the history of literature tho best method of nrocedure is to extract general history from the life-story of individuals and1 their books." The more marked1 -characteristics of any period of liter- ature are revealed in certain authors, who may be taken as tvpes of that oeriod. Tims, I tho meaning of the Renaissance Movement may be better comprehended from a. study of the works of Michael Angelo. Boccaccio, etc., than- from that of the innumerable biogra- phies and productions of lesser lights. In the case of Wales, especially, we are informed in this work, the underhung ideas of the Renai-sance (Y deffroad. nid y diwygiad") take- shape far move definitely in the labours of men like Salisbury. Bishops Morgan and Parry, Dr. John Davies, Ellis Wynn, Morgan ¡ Lhvyd. etc.. who attempted serious works, than they do in the fugitive efforts of the motley host of translators. We thoroughly acree with this view, and believe that a care- a L- ful perusal of the volume will convince the reader that the author has- exercised com- mendable* discrimination in the choice of his •'types." These are Salesbnry. Morgan, 'and Parry, the Bible translators; Vicar Prichard. the Hoearth of the Pen; Morgan Llwyd. the Seer of Gwynedd Huw Morvs, the Carol-ist or Dvffryn C('iriog: Charles Edward-v, the he- loved anther Ellis Wynn, the sleeping bard Griffith Jo neve the pioneer of education Theophillus Jones, the patriot historian; and Goronwy Owen, the classical poet. The life work of these intellectual and spiritual lights is outlined in brief strokes of I rieorons analysis, and the Dco'nt at which out- side. i.e. Renaissance, influence came to bear upon the line'of thought followed by them, is ck-arly indicated. This is as it should he. for we have heard over much about tin* influence of Csltic liter- ature npon that of other ratione. and too little of the influence of other literatures upon our own. Welsh writers, -as the author very justly animadverts, have been- too prone to view literary interactions from an exclu- sively CvTaric standpoint. We believe that full justice has been done for tho first time to the work of Mo-ga'i Lhn-d. and we heartily commend to the youthful patriots of Wales the chapter 011 the immortal Seer of Gwynedd. In illustration of tile style and treatment, wc* re- produce" the following paragraph. "Here are the deeper I of Morgan LlwHI, He has been called a nivstic. In olle of the word he was such, but we nrefcr to say that although often a mvstir. he w as aivrays a seer. His visions of the Goleuni MewnoJ show that he had been vouchsafed a revelation of the inmost dre.am- image of tho world. He. it is true. vo7ne- ti-n,es guage the meaning of which it is not to comprehend, but he itevei- makes the danger- ous approaches to obscurantism which are to be found in the works of mystics. Wh it he s.< es ire l vision and hears in a dream he sees and he°rs clearly. The deeo inner fountain of i^siorht p jlT,(, exhausted in the writings of Bttdime 'nd other mystics. These .*>'<• concerned' with tho external fern of truth, and' are obliged, in order to make their sys- tem artistic and acceptable, to disfienre and t.o destroy inward wart. Morgan Llwvd's 111 17 it be such, will be understood b- men of all time, -whilst the- mvstic;sm of Bcehme will remain intelligible n 11 1 v through the medium of the events of mediaeval 11;1 torv." Mr. Xcun'is's style of writing is as r>h a^iir^ as his stvk' -of ore a china:, always forcible and Hear, ,n,r1 in the, mullinliritv or hlabours in the Olcl i?vrish he ha•; rot reelected his flock, and he has rrea<-hW! to less emote seats than any eTorgvman. I have known- to laborr here for fifty "{.ays. But there is a iM<Tl^t. a pairfnl 31 e-r)ect. on the nart of the authori- ties of th"^ Established Church hy th" indifTe r- cnt marker in which they have shut their m-es or. the good work of a snrcere 9'1«1 f-»'th- for so to reahse tire value to its-elf of he greatest ornament in. the diocese of Tdau- datt." LI a r.-gynwyd • C ADR A WD.

MAESTEG DISTRICT COUNCIL.…

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MAESTEG DISTRICT COUNCIL.…

MAESTEG DISTRICT COUNCIL.…