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PORTUCAWL DiSikiU urtJNCIL.

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ARMY ORGANISATION. !

-------..---.-Agriculture…

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GLAMORGAN QUARTER SESSIONS-

STRIKING BRIDOEND EVIDENCE.

--LOCAL GOSSIP. ----.--.

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LOCAL GOSSIP. Regarding the reference vo Oliver Crom- well's Welsh descent in this column two weeks ago, Mr. W. Davies (Gwilym Glan. Ogwy) writes: Oliver Cromwell was the son of Robert Cromwell, the second son of .Henry Cromwell, grandson of Morgan Williams of Glamorgan, who married a sister of VValtei Cromwell Earl of Essex, and afterwards as- sumed the name of Cromwell, and settled at Hitchinbrook, near Huntingdon. Robert Cromwell married Elizabein Steward, sister of Sir Thomas Steward, remotely allied to the Scottish R-oyal Family. The issue of this marriage was five daughters and a son, Oliver Cromwell, who was born at Huntingdon on the 2oth April, 1599. The genealogy of Oliver Cromwell, which I have taken from an extract from an old MS. written in the hand- writing of lago ab Dewi in 1685, is now in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. Dr. John Williams, M.R.C.S., of Bridgend, father of Mr. A. J. Williams, of Coedymwstwr. ex-M.P. for South Glamorgan, was a lineal descendant of an older brother of the Richard Williams, great-grandfather of Oliver Crom- well. so our friend and neighbour at Coedy- mwstwr comes from a noble and illustrious ancestry. Richard Williams alias Cromwell was born at Whitchurch .ear Cardiff. Oliver Cromwell had English, Scotch and Welsh blood in his veins, and the combined energy of the three, races was strikingly manifested in his physical and mental organization. The Williams's family of Aberpergwm and St. Donats, are said to have descended from Oliver Cromwell. It is recorded that Henry VIII. gave a grant of Neath Abbey and lands to Sir Richard Williams, alias Cromwell, of Whitchurch, who resided at Blaen Baglan Avan, and probably they are descended from Iestyn ap Gwrgan, the last native Prince of Glamorgan." Good men who work for the public weal have to do so without reward, and sometimes are compelled to pay a penalty. Mr. W. S. de Winton went with Mr. Griffith Boscawen to a Church Defence meeting at Seven Oaks, and at the close a worthy colonel was put np to second a vote of thanks to Mr. de Winton. Doubtlessly meaning it as a compliment, says the Western Mail," the colonel quoted "Taffy was a Welshman, Taffy was a thief." though he scarcely succeeded in making it look like a compliment. Anyhow, when Mr. do Winton went to the ante-room he found that his umbrella had been taken and none left in its place. Then, again, there is the ReVl, H. Eynon Lewis, who worked like a Tro- jan to bring all Nonconformist Wales to a convention in Cardiff. Mr. Lloyd George captured the convention, and somebody else captured and carried away Mr. Lewis's new guinea umbrella, so he went home with his faith in men shattered to atoms. Lady Ninian Crichton-Stuart, in opening the new club-house at Falkland the other day, confessed with merry shamefaeedness that she is no golfer. Her first experience of the game (says the Ladies' Field") was gained in Tasmania ten years ago, when her father (Lord Gormanston) was Governor. Some en- thusiastic ladies and gentlemen of Scottish extraction started a club and persuaded her to join. Her career as a player was un- marked by anything save disaster she broke more clubs, lost more balls, and caused greater agony of mind to her partner in a foursome than anyone who had ever made the round of the links. Her record, she averred, was something like 90 strokes in a hole. Her best wishes go out to golfers all the same. and she performed her part of the opening cere- mony very gracefully. Mr. Richard Bell, M.P., is the subject of the character sketch in the October issue of the "Review of Reviews," and the writer states" Mr. Richard Bell is a Welshman by birth, though in disposition he has not much in common with what is usually re- garded at Celtic temperament. He is cau- tious and deliberate in action, and prefers the ways to peace to those of conflict. He was born in the parish of Penderryn, in Brecon, in 18.59. His father was a police- sergeant in the Glamorgan constabulary. His early years were spent in Merthyr Tydfil, and there he received the ordinary common school education imparted first in a Church and subsequently in a National' School. At the age of 13 he began to earn his own living a» an office boy in the Cyfarthfa Iron Works." There was a good deal of superstition in Glamorgan even as late as 60 years ago. Here is an extract from a Welsh journal published at that period —" For some time back a. young woman in an adjoining parish has been much troubled by the visits of a former lover, who died during the Merthyr riots, and' who desired her to meet him at a place appointed last week. The girl was (or pretended to be) so alarmed that she took to bed, but got up to keep the appointment, accompanied by her father and other friends. The ghost was true to his time, and carried her away over the mountain to Merthyr, whence she returned home (a distance of about seven miles there and back) in a quarter of an hour." It is a melancholy fact," adds the journal, "that a great majority of the working people believe this absurd story." Mr. Howell Cuthbertson, the well-known coroner for the Neath district, always takes ca,re to read up the newspaper reports of the tragic occurrences into winch he has after- wards to inquire, and he seldom turns up at an inquest without a substantial bundle of newspapers containing reports of the acci- dent, suicide, or murder about which the in- quest is being held. Theete reports Mr. Cuthbertson has so closely studied that he has an inside knowledge of the case, which en- ables him to put pertinent questions to wit- nesses and elicit further material evidence. Occasionally, of course, Mr Cuthbertson finds the newspaper reports not precisely accurate in all1 details, but he realises that news of a sensational occurrence has often to be gathered under most difficult and confusing circumstances, and that the witnesses from whom reporters have to gather their infor- mation are not always capable of conveying an accurate description of what they have seen. He therefore makes allowances, and is not averse to using the Press as an aid in his official duties. Some time ago (says a contemporary) the Rev. J. T. Rhys sat in the gallery of Mr. Sturgeon's Tabernacle in London listening to an address by Mr. Lloyd-George. The President of the Board of Trade made a Welsh remark, and Mr. Rhys said, Clywch, clywch." One of the deacons of the Taber- nacle hastened to his side and said, Now, my boy, no swearing here." Referring to the death of Mr. Thomas Wil- liams, of Brynmenin, Gwilym Glan Ogwy" writes: I cannot abstain from making a passing reference to so unique a Welsh char- acter. How long his ancestors have dwelt on the banks of the Ogmore no one can tell, but he was so racy of the soil that he knew every man, woman, and child in the sur- rounding community, and the history of their ancestors, for no one knowri how many gener- ations. yet he had not wn. unkind word to say even about families that had weak points in their family tree. He had sons and daugh- ten;-some. of the former successful men of busirhess in) Cardiff, Barry, and the Garw Valley. A keen man of business himself, he averred that a knowledge of the Welsh lan- guage was a. valuable asset to him, and he in- culcated the same views in his family circle, and his children are fluent bilinguists."

BRIDGEND POLICE COURT.I

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BRIDGEND BOARD OF GUARDIANS

GWENLLIAN.

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PENYBONT DISTRICT COUNCIL.I

Glamorgan Assizes.

The Weather and the Crops.

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