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FOOTBALL FIXTURES.I

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LOCAL TIME TABLE,

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BRIDGEND LISTENS TO BKlDGERD

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GLAMORGANSHIRE SCHOOLS.I

LOCAL RAILWAY COMPANIES. .

The Bath and West Soeiety.

Weather and the Crops.

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MR. WHITELEY MURDERED. .

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MR. WHITELEY MURDERED. THE FAMOUS UNIVERSAJj PROVIDER" SHOT DEAD IN HIS SHOP. ATTEMPTED SUICIDE OF HIS ASSAILANT. A sensational tragedy took place in West- bourne-grove on Thursday, afternoon, last week. Mr. William Whiteley, the famous Universal Provider," being shot dead. The tragic affair occurred in the lace department of Messrs. Whiteley's establishment between half-past twelve and a quarter to one. About half-past ten in tHe morning one of the attendants in livery stationed at the on- trance to the stores in Westbourne-grove was approached by a well-dressed young man. The man asked the attendant the way to the principal entrance to the stores, and was directed there. Soon afterwards he came back again and walked up and down the road for some distance smoking a pipe. There was nothing in his demeanour to at- tract. any attention. After some time he went away, apparently to the Westbourne- grove entrance, where he entered, and made his way to the lace department. Mr. Whiteley, it appears, had come to his office about 10 o'clock, and in the course of the morning his assailant had been shown into his private office, where he remained closeted with the chief of the firm for about three- quarters of an hour. When Mr. Gross, his corresponding clerk, went into Mr. White- ley's room the latter said to him, "I cannot see you now, Mr. Gross; I hope to see you presently." Mr. Whiteley, who evidently desired to get rid of his assailant, was the first to emerge from the room, and was heard to say, I can't stop to argue with you any longer. If you don't go I shall have to call the police." Po The sound of shots was immediately after- wards heard. A bullet struck Mr. Whitelev in the back of the neck, and when he turned round his assailant fired several shots at him. Mr. Whiteley immediately fell to the ground. The sound of the shots caused great conster- nation, and assistants from all parts of the building rushed to ascertain the cause. Be- fore they could seize the man he had turned the revolver upon himself and inflicted seri- ous injuries. Medical aid was at once sent for, and the police were summoned from the neighbouring police-station, and within a comparatively short time some half a dozen doctors, together with a number of police officers, were quickly on the scene. It was found on examination that Mr. Whiteley was suffering from four wounds in all, one of which was in the heart, and proved immediately fatal. At 3 o'clock the following notice was posted up on the shutters of the closed shops" Owing to the death of Mr. White- ley this establishment will be closed for the remainder of to-day (Thursday)." THE ASSAILANT. The murderer of Mr. William Whiteley was identified as a man who arrived at Ger- hard's Hotel, Red Lion-street, London, three weeks previously, and registered as Horace George Rayner. He was identified in th3 hospital on Friday by Mr. Gerhard, the pro- prietor of the hotel, whom he had informed that ha was the son of a wealthy London merchant. Emphatic denrals were given by the late Mr. Whiteley's family to the mur- derer's assertion that he is a son of the de- ceased. The mysterious claim, however- emphatic as being made by a Roman Catholic on what seemed to be the brink of his eternity -unhappily recalls the fact that the dead merchant's married life was not entirely happy, and that there was a separation be- tween Mr. and Mrs. Whiteley in 1881. The only document found on the murderer when taken to the hospital after he had shot himself was a paper bearing the follow- ing statement: — To whom it may concern. William Whiteley is my father. This two-fold tragedy is due to his refusal of a request which is perfectly reasonable. OTP RAYNER'S PARENTAGE. There waa much speculation at first as to the identity of the man who gave the name of Horace George Rayner. The earlier asr- gArtiona of the police to the effect that his identity was "ell known, and that there was nothing to connect him with anything per- taining to his victim, was not borne out, and the most astounding communication made in connection with the tragedy was the state- ment of Mr. George Rayner, the reputed father of the murderer, which was issued for publication through his solicitor's on Mon- day evening —" Many statements have been appearing in the Press during the past few days connecting our client, Mr. George Rayner, with the man now lying in St. Mary's Hospital, accused of the murder of the late Mr. William Whiteley. Our client feels acutely that his name has been used and published in this way. We are, there- fore, instructed to give to you a definite statement of the facts concerning which so much has been written, and wo trust that after having these facts clearly set out, no further liberties will be taken with our client's name. The facts are briefly as fol- lows There were two sisters, one by name Emily Turner, and the other Louie Turner Louie Turner being an assistant at William Whiteley's. The other sister was visited by Mr. George Rayner. Some time after Mr. Rayner made the acquaintance of Miss Emily Turner, he was informed that Miss Emily Turner had given birth to a child, and that the child was his. Mr. Rayner thereupon assumed the duties and obligations thus thrust upon him, and proceeded with the up- bringing and education of his son. About two years after this Emily Turner was again about to give birth to a child, and she there- upon confessed to Mr. George Rayner that the son he was bringing up as his own was, in fact, neither his son nor her own, and, in fact, that she did not give birth to it. This confession being made, it was mutually agreed between Mr. Rayner and Miss Turner that the son should be relegated to its pro- per parents. Miss Emily Turner informed Mr. Rayner that the child she was about to give birth to was his child, and, although Mr. Rayner had grave reasons to doubt this, owing to the position in which he found himself, he felt it incumbent upon him to accept the responsibility, and promised Miss Turner that the child should be properly educated. Shortly after this Miss Turner left Mr. Rayner and was married. Mr. Rayner has kept his promise to Miss Turner, and has acted as foster-father to this latter son, who is the man now lying in St. Mary's Hospital. The infant was registered by Miss Emily Turner wrongfully in Mr. Rayner's name, the only name to which he is entitled being that of his mother. Messrs. Harold Edwards and Colin also desire it to be known that they deny that M'r. George Ra yner has any connection with Messrs. I Charles Dagnall and Co., insurance brokers, 61 King William-street, E.C." It is stated that Mr. Whiteley was ac- quainted with the Misses Turner. Miss Emily Turner, the. mother of the pri- soner, has been dead some time. Rayner is re-oalled in Birmingham as having: filled a position as correspondence clerk for Tubes (Limited) between October, 1899. and April, 1901. He was known as Horace G. Payne, and it is stated that about j Christmas, 1899, he volunteered a statement to a member of the firm that his real name was Rayner. Some time after, lie confided to his chief that he was the son of Mr. Williams Whitely. He left in 1901 ostensibly to become private secretary to a gentleman of title. WILFUL MURDER." At the inquest on Tuesday a verdict of "Wilful Murder" was returned against Rayner, who was committed for trial at the. Central Criminial Court on the coroner's warrant.

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WELSH MINERS' WAGES -41----

A Quaint Auction.

Glamorgan Chamber of Agriculture.

MR. WHITELEY MURDERED. .