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FIRST MEETING.

CONCERT AT BKIDGEND.

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THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE AND…

POLICE COURT PROCEEDINGS.

SUMMER TRIPPERS WILL NOTE.

NEWCASTLE HIGHER PARISH COUNCIL.

__---------NEATH BOROUGH POLICE.

DANCE AT TAIBACH.

FASHIONABLE WEDDING AT NEATH.

TYTHEGSTONE HIGHER RACES.

--+-----A DISCLAIMER.

PYLE PARISH COUNCIL.

TONDU CHAMBER OF TRADE. --

BETTWS.

LLANDILO.

TOND-J.

TREOES.

ABERAVON.

NEATH.

COWBEIDGE,

LLANTWIT MAJOR.

G \RW YALLEY.

MELINCRYTHAN.

TYNEWYDD.

tPONTYCYMMER.

PORTHCAWL.

|KENFJG HILL.

MAESTEG.

TONDU RAILWAYMEN AT SUPPER.

MEETINGS AT PENCOED, COYCHURCH…

CONCERT AT ABERDULAIS.

DEPARTURE OF POLICE-INSPECTOR…

.... ABERAVON COUNTY POLICE.

BRIDGEND SOHOOL BOARD.

MIRACULOUS CURE OF A COYCHURCH…

CARRIAGE OF LORD WOLVERTON…

DISPUTE BETWEEN DIAMOND MERCHANTS.

FOUR MEN DROWNED.

THE DEGRADATION OF CAPTAIN…

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THE DEGRADATION OF CAPTAIN DREYFUS. A PAINFUL SPBCTACLB. The degradation of Captain Alfred Dreyfus, the officer of the Frenoh General Staff, who was lately condemned by oourt-martial to confinement for life in a fortross and to degradation from his rank for having communicated military secrets to a foreign Government, took place at nine o'clock in the morning at the Ecole Militaire, in Paris. Dreyfus, who had been lodged iu the Cherche Midi Prison since his sentence, slept profoundly until five o'clock, when he was aroused and told that the degredation was fixed for nine o'clock. Ho betrayed no marked emotion, but his face assumed a livid aspect when he put on hi uuiform and buckled ou his sword for the last time. When he was dress d, he was taken to tho guard room to sign the prison register, and was then placed in charge of two gendarmes, who, revolver in baud, con- ducted their prisoner in a covered military four- gon, belonging to the Squadron of Cavalry. The vehicle which wiw drawn by four horKos, was immediately driven off at a niuart pace to the Ecole Militaire, preceded by two mounted gendarmes, es- corted by a detaclimeut of the Republican Guard with drawn swords. A considerable crowd had aireaily culleuteu uucsiae tile military octiooi, out scattorod to let the fourgon and itM escort pass. au arriving at his destination Dreyfus was at once taken to an improvised cell in an outbuilding of the school. There he remaixed until towards eight o'clock, by which hour the troops told off to be present at the degradation, consisting of detachments ol every arm of the service iu the garrison of Paris, were under arms in the Great Quadrangle. Alto- gether 5,000 men, under tho command of Genera) Darras, were assemblod. At ten minutes past eight Dreyfus, still escorted by two gendarmes, was taken to another apartment close to the square itself, so that he could be the more easily brought out into the presence of the assembled troops at the proper moment. Meanwhile the crowd outside had increased greatly, and M. Lepine (the Prefect of Police) was present in person to assure the mainten- ance of order. Punctually at nine o'clock, Captain Dreyfus, who was in full uniform, was led out into the square, on all side of which the troops were drawn up in two lines. In the midst was the band of the 39th Regiment, with the buglers and drummera of the other corps. The oommander of the troops General Darras, occupied the coutre of the quadrangle with his staff. Dreyfus who was eoorted by four artillerymen in command of a oorporal, was led across the square, the party halt- ing before the General. The prisoner, who was pale and flushed by turns, marched with a firm step. He appeared to be greatly excited and moved. At a sign from General Darras, an official read alond the oentence of the Court-martial, and then the General addressing the prisoner, pronounced the following words :—" Alfred Dreyfus, you are adjudged unworthy to bear arms, and in the name of the Fenoh people we degrade you." The command to begin the act of degrada- tion waa then given, and a non-commissioned officer of the Republican Guard advanoed to carry it out. The Infantry presented arms, the Cavalrymen raised their Bwords, and the drums beat. As the ofiioer approached to carry out tho sentence, Dreyfus started back and cried out loudly, I am innocent; I swear it. Long live France This he repeated more tliau once, in oven louder tones. The crowd outside, who were gathered in thick ranks round the railings, and filled all avail- able windows and roofs, heard the prisoner's cry of protest, and joined with vehement shouts of "Death to the traitor! and other words of opprobious de- nunciation. The cry of Death to the German I was especially noticeable, and was repeated many times. Dreyfus, though manifesting a growing ex- citement, made no attempt to resist the ofiioer de- puted to accomplish the degradation. The first act was the tearing off the epaulettes, next the lace on the tunic and the other distinctions marking the officer's grade ware taken off, and, finally, the sword was unhuokled, drawn from the scabbard, and broken in two, the fragments being thrown at the feet of the condemned man. As his sword was being broken, Dreyfus again uttered his despairing cry of" Je suiø innocent! Vive Ie France." The degraded officer had then to march hare-headed round the square in front of the troops. He preserved his fortitude in an extraordinary degree, and never seemed to falter. All he pasned the place where the journalists were poRted.ho turned to them aud said in loud, firm tones: "Tell the whole of France that I am innocent." Some offionrs of the R jsnrve, who were stauding by, retorted with the words, "Down with J lid 811 Silence, traitor!" The prisoner became greatly excited at these contumelious epi- thets, and turning sharply round, faced the officers who had spoken with a thrsateniug air. The gunners, iu whoe charge he was, seized him, however, and forced him to continue the humiliating march round the quadrangle. The whole proceedings were over by a quarter-past nine. Some of the evening papers report that just before being finally removed Captain Dreyfus turned to those who had oharge of him and said, I am inno- cent. If I did hatnl over documents to foreigners it was done as a bnit, in order to obtain from them more important information. In three yeara' time the truth will be known, and the Minister of War himself will < p >n a fresh enquiry into the matter."

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