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FIGHT BETWEEN RUBEN MARTIN…

..THE FIGHT i

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THE FIGHT Began with the usual- caution, each advancing and breaking ground in turn. Defoe manoeuvred to place his left hand, which, after some time, he succeeded in doing-, but was reuuned sharply on I the loins. Martin was evidently fighting in order and curbing his impetuosity. Defoe's attitude > was beautiful, and his quick hitting and getting away was much admired. A little more weight to his hand and less grace in his flourishes were wanted. At last they come to a rally, and mis- chief is expected, but die frienas to humanity are nonsuited, as Martin is thrown on his knees with- out a hurt. Round 2d. This was a round almost unequalled for du-ation it lasted 21 minutes, and ought to have decided the fight. Defoe played skip and go one as before, and Mariin, still in leading- strings, did nothing but stop, lie was the re- ceiver-general of the ring, but his hits were on the half-pay list. Defoe marked his mouth Mariin counter-hit a point too late. Defoe put a cross-bun on his chest, and Martin, with a swing- ing right hand, rung a peal h? Defoe's ear. Dick threw his weight at Reuben's head. Weil for his eye he has a brow like a penthouse, but still it got a hanging of sables. Mavtin was slow out of all reason, and all his science consisted in stop- ping. At last Defoe plucked up bis .spirit, and went to work in earnest, and planted a flusa hit on Martin's mouth. His head went back as it taG neck was cracked. Again the same, and the I blood came up as aA thiru (iitto. This looked a finisher, as the gore flowed in a strr-.In and Marti'* seemed scarcely ibie Yo i stand, but his prime game would not let him go t down—20 to 1 on Defoe, no takers. But when Defoe doubled him up with a straight hit in the wind, it was a mountain to a mousetrap, and the HIUer llowtfi to the Holein the Wall—in short, it is all up. Still Martin kept his legs, and Defoe, instead of going in to finish, stood gazirigathiin, till Reuben gathered fresh wind, and looked as a friend near-us said, as how he would die for nobody." Murtin's right hand was still a shield. Defoe let the moment pass, and his left hand lost its knack. The round, which was nearly half an hour long, ended in a short rally, and in Defoe's being thrown ir gallant Style by Martin. Cheers for Reuben all round the ring* 3. Martin's nMe was. mbyfied. again, and he was still playing Dic'cy Cautious, but Jon2s pushed him in te fight, which he did like a trump, and after shuffling his man, and cutting him, he left him lile the curse of Scatl&nd—<scarcely worth the taking up. li! 5th, (5th, 7th, and 8tb rounds were of the same character—wrestling and trying for the fall. Martin had by no means the worst of it. 9. 'Defoe would not fight, and the men again I closed, when Martin contrived to stoop, and catching Defoe by the hams, lifted him arm high, and threw him with al] his force on the ground, and then, to make the pressure even, fell <on him like a sack of lead. Cries of foul, a id an attempt io break in the ring, but it was ail square. 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Hugging-rounds. Martin received a slap on the left eav, but got the best of the fighting v/hen he went in, as his friends from all sides called to him io tight away. In the last round Defoe showed wMte by I dropping. J 15. Martiij more on the alert, and lie opened a vintage on Defoe's nose. I>5 and 17. Ratner in Defoe's favoivr, but still it is any man's, battle. IS. Martin threw off in full cry, and hunted Defoe's head tilt it reeled again-l; followed liiiy, ,I so hard that DelOcabsolutelytumedaway to save his skull's skin, but was not, allowed a moment's respite until lie doubled and dropped. 10 anjA wrestle and a roll. 1. This was the last round- Defoe received more punishment than was supposed, and when brought up to the scratch nature was exhausted within him, and art could do no more—not even Tom. Oliver's soft hand gently waving the zephyrs, could give him wind, nor Josh Hudson's patting him for a dearec inspire him wilt fresh piuck. He was beat to a stand-still, and dropped with a hit on the head that left him the loser of one hundred guineas, and Martin a winner, in spite z, of all his faults and want of science. The battle lasted one hour and seven minutes.

POETRY.

THE SHIPWRECK.

THE OLD REVERIE.

OBSERVATIONS.

WESTERS ClRCUlT.- WINCHESTER.

IMPERIAL PARLIAMENT.

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