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-.....--------To the Editor…

To the Editor of the North…

For the North Wales Gazette.

To the Editor of the North…

On forming Plantations of…

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It may appear scarcely credible to those un- acquainted with human nature in its depravi- ty, but it is a fact, that the wife of one of the unhappy wretches condemned at the last War- wick Assizes, and afterwards reprieved, has since been openly married to another man- availing herself of that form of fiction of law by which the capitally condemned are consi- dered as having no longer legal existence A house directly in view of the prison walls within which her former husband is still cou- fined, was even chosen as the scene of those festivities and rejoicings (such as lhOfrere) which took place on the occasion. Tht late Russian Campaign.-The followino* description of the dreadful situation of the French army, after the passage of the Bere- sina, is extracted from a small pamphlet, written by a German Officer, in the service of Russia, which has been published at St. Pe- tersburgh A rigorous cold now perfected their misery --no longer capable of supporting the severity of their sufferings, arms and baggage were thrown away. The greater part, without thoes or gait- ers, had wrapped their legs in pieces of blankets, and twisted old hats about their feet. Each en- deavoured to secure his head and shoulders from the cold, with whatever covering he could find some with old sacks and matts, others with the. skins of animals recently flayed-happy those who were possessed of scraps of fur. The offi- cers and soldiers, overtaken with death-like numbness, with arms folded, and countenances fixed, followed each other. The guards fared no better than the rest; covered with rags, and dy- ing with hunger, and without arms, all resistance was impossible. The cry of Cossacks put whole columns in consternation; the line of march was strewed with bodies: each bivouac resembled next day a field of battle. No sooner had one fallen from fatigue and cold, than he was strip- ped by his comrades, to cover themselves with his clothes. All the houses and barns were set on fire; and every burnt space was covered with- the bodies of those who, having approached, and unable to retire when the flames reached them, were consumed. The roads were strewed with prisoners unable to proceed. To such horrors succeeded others, if possible still more dreadful. Pale and disfigured by the smoke, they were seen ranged round the fire like spectres, sitting on the dead bodies of their comrades, until, likS them, they fell and expired. The feet of num- bers, by being exposed to the cold, were gan. grened, and reduced to a state of perfect imbeci- lity-they with difficulty walked; others lost their speech. Some, from excess of cold and hunger, were seized with madness; and roasted and eat the flesh of their dead comrades, or gnaw- ed their own hands and arms. In this state of phremy, many rushed into the flames and perish- ed, uttering the most dreadful cries. In fine, it is impossible for any one, who has not witnessed this most frightful spectacle, to form any true. idea of these united calamitiesi, such as the an- nals of the world afford no example.

. COPPER ORE

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