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HELYELLIN.

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Curious Story of an apparition••—Mr. John Bonnell, was a commoner of Queen's Coiiegc. Oxford he was it) his person and his gait, and had a particular manner of hold- ing up his gown behind, so that to any one; who had once seen him he might be known by his back as well as by his face. On Sunday 1150, Mr. Ballard, who was ■ then of Magdalen College and iii.vsolf wei-t-' t, I talking together at Parker's door. i was then waiting for the sound of the trumpet, and suddenly Mr. Ballard cried out, Lord have mercy upon me, who is that coming out ot yo,,ir -1 -looked, and saw, as i sup posed, Mr. Bonne!, and replied, he is a gen- tleman of our house, und htsname is Bonnell; he comeS from Stanton Harcourt. My (I sa id Mr. Ballard, I never saw such a face iu < ill mv life. I answered slightly, his lace isli much the same as it always is 1 think it is a little more inflamed and swelled than it is sometimes, perhaps he has buckled his band too tight, but I should not have observed it if you had not spoken. Well, said Mr. Bal- lard again, I never shall forget him as long as I live, and seemed. to be much disconcerted and frightened. This figure I saw without any emotion or suspicion, it came down the qua- drance, came out at the gale, and walked up the High-street; we followed it wilh our eyes till it came to cat-street, where we lost it. the trumpet sounded, and Mr. Ballard and I parted, and I went into the Hail, and thought no more of' 'i".r. Bo[inell. Iu the evening the prayers of the chapel were desired for one who was in a very sick and dangerous condi- tion. When I came out of the chapel, 1 in- quired of one of the scholars, James Harrison, in the hearing of several others, who it wa that was prayed for ? and was answered, Mr. Bonnell, sen. Boiiiiell seil. sztlfi I Nvitli isto- nishment, what's the matter with him? he was very well to day, for I saw him go to dinner. You are very much mistaken answered the scholar, for he has not been out of his bed for some days. I then asserted more pos- sitively, that 1 had seen him, and that a gen- tleman was with me, who saw him too. This came presently to the ears of Dr. Fothergill, who had been my tutor. After supper he took me aside, and questioned me about it, and said, he was very sorry 1 had mentioned the matter so publicly, for Mr. B. was dangerous- ly ill. I replied, 1 was sorry too. but I had done it innocently, anti the next day Mr. B. died. This memorandum was lately found amongst the papers of the Rev. Mr, Mores, late of Layfon, in Essex, formerly of Queen's College, Oxford, and communicated to the public through the means of the Gentleman's -j Magazine, Oct. 1783, by Edward Rowe Moves, E, sq. liis son. ] Essay on the effectual cure of I'Ve-,zs.Tav- ing had a wen of the strumous kind, of large t, r, size and long standing, upon the side of my face, immediately below my right ear, 1 was 1 informed by different people, that, if I would appiy salt and water to it I should get rid of j it. In August 1798, I put a quantity of salt and water into a saucepan, and boiled it for 4 minutes, with which I bathed the whole sur- face frequently while it continued warm, as also after it became cold, so often as 10 or 12 times daily, always stirring up the salt depo- sited at the bottom of the basin, and incor- porating it again with the water before I ap plied it. On the 11th day from the first ap plication, while shaving, 1 observed a small discharge, which being assisted by a gentle pressure, the whole contents were soon emp-* tied, without the smallest pain and without blood. 1 feel it a duty thus to make it public; being convinced it can produce no bad effect, and every person having it in his power to make the trial. At the same time, I beg' leave to caution, that no person should be disheartened from the length of time it may be necessary to continue the application as, in some cases, it has required 3 or 4 months, though iu the last only 30 days; but in all, without pain or inconvenience of any kind, or any previous notice of the discharge, till it actually took place. WILLIAM CHESHOLME.

AGRICULTURAL REPORT.

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A MODERN SONNET:

A AIURdL SIMILE.

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11:1 MISCELLANIES. -