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itotttrmT (Sxrssip. BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT, Ow readers wiH understand that ice do not hold ourselves respon. tihle for our able Correspondent's opinions. THE drama of the general elections is over, and the curtain falls in the last scene of the first act on Mrs. Disraeli coroneted as Lady Beaconsfield. Mrs. Disraeli was the widow of a wealthy Welshman, very much her senior, when she married" the present Premier. Mr- Wyndham Lewis and Mr. Disraeli jointly contested and won the borough of Shrewsbury, and sat for it until the former died. To his wife's large fortune and self-sacrificing devotion Mr. Disraeli owes the opportunity 0f achieving the success to which even his ex- traordinary parliamentary talents would have been unequal With only his small private fortune. Lady Beaconsfield takes her title from a village in Buckinghamshire, near which once stood the mansion of one of England's greatest statesmen, orators, and political writers, Ed- mund Burke. From Beaconsfield he dated several of his immortal letters; but the house has long been pulled down, and the name only survives in the long, straggling village through which the Queen's Hounds often pursue a road-running deer. Hughenden Manor is the name of Mr. Disraeli's seat, purchased for him more than twenty years ago to enable him to contest that division of Bucks, with the support of the Duke of Buckingham. It was thought in the csunty that young Mr. Disraeli (he was then about forty) was very fortu- nate to have the patronage of the great duke. The duke is dead, insolvent and dishonoured. His vast territories-the accumulation of half-a-dozen fortunate marriages, and the results of a century of political patro- sage--hava been sold, and broken up into a score of be estates; and his son, a man of eminent respecta. bility and industry, sits in the Cabinet as a Secretary o State under the Premier, plain Mr. Disraeli. Sir Rainald Knightlay, a Northamptonshire baronet, of ancient family, with ten times more pride than any political peer of the present generation, in a speech to his constituents, expressed his satisfaction at a rumour that the Premier was to be shelved and silenced in the House of Peers. It is evident that this is not to be while health and power to debate and rule remain with him. When Mr. Disraeli chooses to retire into quiet life, the title of Lord Hughenden, of Hughenden Manor, will be open to him. THE newspapers this week note the death of a man whose sudden incapacity for the important office he held nearly plunged this country into a war with America. Sir John D. Harding was Advocate-General during the first part of the great American rebellion. He was a man of remarkable vigour of body and mind. His friends anticipated a brilliant career for him; but while the papers and evi- dence on the Alabama case were before him he became insane, and before advice could be obtained the pirate or privateer escaped. Sir John was suddenly lost to the world his tall form was seen, his loud, arrogant voice heard ao more in Doctors' Commons. The Govern. ment of the day was severely blamed becaase of the delays in the Advocate-General's office but the legal profession are loyal to each other, and the explanation of the extraordinary laches in the Alabama case re- mained a secret even to the day ef Sir John Harding's death. When we remember the irritation caused in America by the depredations of the Alabama, one cannot help thinking that delicacy may be carried too far. THE gossips were all:astonished by learning that the Marquis of Hastings had died with a fortune-that, however, remains to be seen when the debts are paid, and the balance ascertained. But people are still more astonished tog find that the Marquis has coupled his bequest to his young and beautiful wife with the con- dition that she forfeits the life interest under his will if sh marries again. Considering that by a runaway match she obtained no settlement, and the sort of invalid husband the Marquis made, this seems like carrying selfishness to the grave, especially as there are no children to be injured by a second marriage. The Earl of Stamford, who, with five times the fortune the Marquis of Hastings ever inherited, found very nearly the bottom of his parse in the race-course, having failed to sell the remainder of his stud because the reserved prices were too high to run, advertises all his race-horses in terms that remind one of a shopkeeper disposing of the remains of his stock in job lots. Great bargains! Such an opportunity may never occur again! THE young Dake of St. Albans, after a brief career, has retired into private life and matrimony with the beautiful and dowerless niece of an earl. The Earl of Jersey, fortanate enough to be robbed very early in his career, is nursing his estate in a sort of voluntary rustication. A young Scotch peer has been obliged to travel on the Continent before he came of age. The Duke of Newcastle, after a most disastrous year, has sold the splendid house his father-in-law, Mr. Hope, built in Down-street, Piccadilly, to the Junior Athenaeum Club. How any club can afford to pay such a rent is wonderful, most of all a club of townsmen for it is not to be supposed that country gentlemen will join a club with such a name. The part of Piccadilly facing the Green-park is, perhaps, one of the pleasantest spots .of London, but rather too much out of the way for a club. Nothing better, in my opinion, than "the sweet shady side of Pall-mall." A new and very fashionable club, the "St. James's," has taken Lord Coventry's house, so there are now three, including the one in Carnbrid ge- ha use, between Half-moon-street and Hyde-park-corner. The Arlington, the gambling club par excellence, has finally assumed the appropriate name of the "Turf." Here whist is still played for fabulous sums, and admission is a matter of the greatest difficulty for a man out of the set" and not fabulously rich. A SMALL crop of notices for private bills appears in the papers. The gentle, confiding public seem to be taking a longer time to forget their last blistering by public companies. A new line to Brighton ,-much wanted-is proposed, but where are the sub, scribers and where is the contractor ? A little line of a mile from Islington to Moorgate-street is on an entirely new plan no embankments, no arches; but the rail- road is to be carried on iron girders, supparted on iron pillars—so it will be all ready to put up before coming out of the ironfounder's yard. If this bit succeeds, the whole of London will be traversed in the same way, because, although the Underground is most convenient' it is too expensive to be repeated further. The com' pensations for property destroyed or injured are beyond calculation. Something cheaper must be found to run from the West to the East through mid-London. P. P. a

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