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THE COURT.

THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &c

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THE ARTS, LITERATURE, &c TaE prize of .£50, which is annually awarded for the most approved pfjtare in the Gallery of the Royal Man- chester Institution, has been given to Mr. Mason, on account of his painting, "The Evening Hymn)" which attracted much admiration at the Royal Academy this year. THE foundation-stone of the new town-hall, at Manchester, the designing of which building was given to Mr. A. Waterhouse, has been laid with much ceremony. This hall will contain about 240 rooms, cost about half a million pounds, and comprise a clock-tower 250 feet high, that is, one-fourth higher than the Monu- ment, London. IT appears that M. Remusat, the flute-player, has formed at Shang-Hai a musical society of 450 members, for whose amusement an orchestra of 30 instrumentalists and a chorus of 25 singers are in the habit of periodically performing. Rossini's "Stabat Mater" is one of the pieces which are now being rehearsed. The performance of a hymn to the Mater Dolorosa must surely be a novelty to the inhabitants of the Celestial Empire. As the next meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science will be held at Exeter, the citizens have begun to make preparations for the re- ception of the members by electing Mr. H. S. Ellis mayor. This gentleman was one of the deputation who went from Exeter to the association meeting at Norwich, for the purpose of inviting the members to visit the West of England. SOME very interesting statues have recently been placed in the Egyptian Saloon, British Museum. Also, in a table-case, which stands in the centre of jjthat hall, a picture said to represent the Pharaoh's Daughter who rescued Moses. THERE will soon be an interesting auction in Am- sterdam of the works of Nic. Pieneman, who was in his lifetime one of the best, painters of the modern Dutch school, and chiefly excelled in portraits. THE Wedgwood Memorial institute, at Burslem, which is characteristically and richly decorated with ceramic works, is to be opened, at Easter next, with a Fine-Art exhibition. A FALSE ALARM.—The audience of the New Vau- deville Theatre, in Brussels, had a narrow escape a few nights ago. S ome unusual caprices in the gas caused a few persons to leave the house. The majority remained, and their feelings were vividly aroused by the sudden fall of the curtain before the end of the piece, and the appearance of the manager, who begged all present to leave the house immediately, as an explosion was ap- parently imminent. At this juncture the gas was turned off altogether, and the alarmed people had to struggle out of the theatre as they best could. It is greatly to their credit that, in spite of the prevailing terror, every one escaped without injury.-A tltencuu-n.

EARTHQUAKES AT SEA.

THE BRITISH CORN TRADE.

------ACTION OF WATER ON LEAD.

ANECDOTE OF HORACE VERNET.…

I Facts and Facetiae,

ITHE ACCLIMATISED RABBITS…

THE TURKISH PRESS IN LONDON.

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AGRICULTURE.

BUTTER MAKING AT CHEESE FACTORIES.

HINTS UPON GARDENING.

THE HUNTING FIELD.

THE STAR SHOWER.

Our Miscellany.

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