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fjjniwn cOossip. BY OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT. Our readers will understand that we do not hold ourselves respon- sible for our able Correspondent's opinions, Txz world of London has had a week's excitement at least, caused by a rumour that London's greatest holi' day was in danger. A dispute has arisen between the lessees of the grand stand at Epsom and the principal part of the racecourse and the new owner of about a quarter of a mile of racecourse extending from the Bushes to Tattenham Corner. The lord of the manor and owner of this valuable bit of land, as well as of thousands of other acres and the fine old house of Beddington-Park, was Mr. Carew, of the family of Bamfylde Moor Carew, dear to schoolboys, in whose family these estates had been from the time of Queen Elizabeth and before. But Mr. Carew, like a good many other fine young English gentlemen of the modern time, has been so fond of racing and other congenial amusements, that these ancestral domains have passed away from him through the Court of Chancery. The Tattenham Corner bit was purchased by a Mr. Stud, a professional betting-man and owner of race-horses. Mr. Stud, who knows how many blue beans make five," demands for this slip of land, for which the proprietors of the stand paid three hundred a year, one thousand a year, and a premium of two thousand pounds, with a lease for twenty years. Thereupon the grand-stand people are very indignant, and the negotiation is broken off. It seems that the Derby entries for 1869 and 1870 have been made for this particular course, and would be void if the course were altered; so Mr. Stud, like the Barbadian nigger, stands stiff;" he knows the strength of his position. The mere racing, that is betting, men cry out, "Move the race to Newmarket, Goodwood, or Ascot." But this would neither suit the grand-stand interest nor all other metropolitan interests involved in the Derby-day, It is said that a new course is being laid out at Epsom, avoiding the contested corner, that a new race for three- year olds, a new Derby, will be opened, and the entries for all races for the next two years cancelled. I have not the least fear that the great race will be moved away from Epsom. The railway interests alone would put down an annual few thousand pounds to prevent that. As for Mr. Stud, although I have no sympathy for people of his calling, it must be admitted that he has quite as much right to make money out of his posL tion as the owners of the grand stand, who raise their rents every year, and charge the highest figure for seats in the worst stand, as far as seeing goes, in Europe. However, I think we may rely on the self-interest of the two parties for an arrangement which will not deprive London and England of one of the greatest sights of the season. THE Ministers continue to be fortunate in ecclesias- tical patronage. The archbishopric of Canter bury, the greatest prize in the Church, is vacant. If it goes to the Archbishop of York, as it generally does, the see of Canterbury will be filled by the finest man on the bench of bishops. He looks truly a Saul among- I must not say the prophets; over six feet, upright as a dart a uniform would convert him into a splendid colonel of Grenadiers. If again Canterbury should be bestowed on the Bishop of Lichfield, Selwyn, who is also Bishop of New Zealand, it will be held by the most muscular Christian in the Church. Bishop Selwyn, in his university days, pulled the best oar in his college boat. In New Zealand he marched, like an apostle, with his knapsack on his back, through the wilds, and, where needed, swam rirers. Bishop Selwyn was a po werful friend ta the noble savage the New Zealander, who has lately been killing a large number of our officers and soldiers in fair fight. It may may be expected that when the bishop returns to England, the colonists, who are not sentimental, will after this last little difficulty grow savage themselves, and take steps to improve the New Zealander off the face of the island. A LADY who was long one of the queens of fashion- "the cynosure of all eyes "-the Dowager-Duchess of Sutherland, died last week, after about two years of severe painful illness and almost entire seclusian, at the comparatively early age of sixty-one. For more than thirty years she has been one of the greatest ladies of the Court. Born a beauty, and a Howard, she married at seventeen the eldest son of the then Marquis of Stafford, already, as one of the heirs of the Bridge- water Canal estates, one of the wealthiest noblemen in Europe but he married the Countess of Sutherland, the heiress of vast estates in Scotland, including nearly the whole of the county from which she took her title. His political friends at the earliest opportunity made lie Marquis of Stafford Duke of Sutherland. On the 3ath of the duke and the countess (duchess), the lady Same into the possession of the accumulated honours and incomes, territorial and manufacturing, of the houses of Stafford and Sutherland. The duke, the husband of the late duchess, had no taste for fashion- able life. He was an excellent landlord, and never so happy as amongst the farmers, or directing the opera- tions of planters and foresters on his northern estates. The late duchess had a passion for everything that was new, beautiful, and expensive, especially for building and gardening. She liked to patronise artists in painting and sculpture, architecture and music, and all other amusing arts. She filled Stafford- house-it was formerly York-house, but the Duke of York, who built it, could not pay for it- with everything that was splendid in furniture and ornament. She added largely to Trentham-hall, and ra-arranged its gardens. She rebuilt Ciiefden on the Thames from the ground, and finished Dunrobin Castle in Scotland. Barry was her architect, Paxton her landscape gardener, and every eminent, and many in-eminent, artists painted her portrait and carved her bust. As long as she was YOUDg-and she grew old, in spite of a very large family, very slowly—painters failed to catch her changing expression or to do justice to her brilliant complexion. In later days flattery became neces- sary and easy. Never had any great lady such a passion for seeing everything and knowing every one, and making herself gracious and agreeable to humble strangers who were likely to amuse her. I had the honour, some dozen years ago, of lending my hand to assist the then stout duchess up a rickety ladder to a curious performance of horse-taming in a barn and on another occasion, at the Prat Paris Exhi- bition, I saw her take tiJe arm of a very rough York- shire iron manufacturer to make him explain all his department, which he did in a very free and easy manner, with some jokes on her grace's weight, without in the least disturbing her equanimity. In fact, as long as the duchess had her health, excitement, admiration, and popularity were as the breath of her nostrils." The Duchess of Sutherland was a wonderful match- maker. She married her eldest son, the present duke soon after he was out of his teens, to the lady who has been since created Countess of Cromarty, hsiress of a vast estate adjoining the Sutherland estate. One daughter is Duchess of Argyll, another will be Duchess of Leinster, and Lady Constance Grosvenor, a more cele- brated beauty than even her mother, will >19 Marehioness of Westminster. The present Duke of Sutherland in- herits the good looks of the family, but not his mother's tastes. He takes rather' after his ancestor the canal- making Duke of Bridgewater. He once had a passion for road locomotives, and has always hated fine clothes; indeed, he never seemed so happy as when covered with oil and coal dust, with a hammer in his hand. Of late years be has become the head amateur fireman of London. He was chairman of the Mechanical Com- mittee at the last exhibition. He is, as representative of the Bridgewater estates, one of the largest share- holders, and a director of the London and North- western Railway; so his castles are not without a mean- ing. If the Duke of Sutherland's manners do not realise the common idea of the dignity of a duke, his pursuits are not degrading; he does not spood his time and l his substance amongst the blacklegs and money lenders of the turf. But perhaps it will not do much harm if a few great noblemen should lose their fortunes on the turf, and disentail their estates, to be broken up into lets of something not much more than a square mile. When we see that the Duke of Bedford, the Duke of Portland, the Marquis of Westminster, the Duke of Sutherland, and the Duke of Northumberland, are all adding to the accumulations in land and money of their fathers and grandfathers, we wonder where it will end. At any rate, the rich farmers of some of them have more fun and less care than their landlords. NOTHING is heard of the Marquis of Bute. Fervent hopes were expressed the other day at Boodle's that the marquis would hunt and would not race. P. P.

PASSING EVENTS.

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BREAD.

¡ FUNERAL OF THE ARCHBISHOP…

SUICIDE IN TOTTENHAM MARSHES.

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COLLISION ON THE OHARING-OROSS…

SHERIFF'S SUIT AND SERVICE.

FE, ARFUL BOILER EXPLOSION.

SUPPLY OF WOOL.j

IDESERTION OF ENGLISH CHILDREN…

A PERSIAN NAVY.

. THE RISING IN SPAIN.

THE DUKE AND DUCHESS DE MONTPENSIER.

ROUMANIA.

THE PRINCE ROYAL OF BELGIUM.

'-._----_'--------MURDER AND…

ROME.

CONTINENTAL GOVERNMENTS AND…

RUSSIA.

JAPAN.

.,. RIOTS IN NEW ORLEANS.

THE RIVER PLATE AND BRAZIL…

■ ■ ■• -ii Jl r\ m\ AMERICA.

INDIA. ENGAGEMENTS WITH THE…

BlOTS AT ROTTERDAM.

ACCIDENT TO MR. BARRY SULLIVAN.

EMBEZZLEMENT BY A POOR-RATE…

----_.-------THE REMOVAL OF…

A TERRIBLE TRAGEDY.

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