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JlfiaiSTKATION COURTS. -

A GALLANT GIRL.

■ -*&■ — RAILWAY FATALITY…

LOCAL POLICE COURTS.

SEVERN AND VYRNIEW FISHERIES.

AL'FA.

THEY SPORT WITH HUMAN iLIFE-…

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THEY SPORT WITH HUMAN iLIFE- I'll give you the plain facts in the case, and you shall help me to judge whether there was a mistake made or not. It seems that some time in 1889— in the winter, no doubt-Mr Strong, of Leicester, was taken down with influenza, often called the grip; and truly a strong grip it has when it once takes a hold. Well, II am glad to say he was able to fight out the battle and get the best of it. But the best wasn't anything to brag of. The influenza hadn't exactly beaten Mr Strong, but it left him in very bad condition. And here is where you and I properly pick up the thread of the story. His meals didn't tempt him the most savonry of dishes had no charms for our friend. He had lost his appetite, and in the long run a man had better lose his money. He forced down something of course, but it gave him such a pain in the chest that he wished he hadn't swallowed a mouthful. Then' naturally, he got so weak and nervous he couldn't sleep o' nights. This, as everybody knows, is the straight road to the graveyard, through the mad- house. Lots of people are making that trip all the time. We must eat and we must sleep. If we don't we are done for. Neuralgic pains, too, made matters worse for Mr Strong. Ile nw a doctor, and what did the doctor do? This is what the patient says on that point: This doctor gave me all kinds of strengthening medicines, but none of them did me any good, and I continued to saffer for month after month." Just what we might have expected. Mr Strong further says: "In October, 18S0, my friend, Mr James Webster, of 28, New Walk, Leicester, advised me to try a medicine called Mother Seigel's Curative Syrup, and I followed his advice. The first bottle gave me great relief, and I began to digest my food and to have an appetite and after I had used three bottles I was quite another man. I was completely cured. All my aches and pains left me, my strength returned, and I have been all right ever since. What astonished me was that the Syrup cured me so quickly, and I shall never cease thanking Mr Webster for making it known to me. YOIl are at liberty to publish my case for the benefit of others. Y 01, rB truly, (Signed) W. STRONG. 41, East-street, Leieesti r, December 30th, 1891." N JW, was there a mistake in td ma iter, and if so, what was it ? Ye*, there was a corumon mistake made. It is an old and seemingly hopeltsg blunder. The doctor," says Mr Strong, gave me all ku.ds of strengthening medicines." Open wide your ears and remember what I'm going to tell you now remember it for the hour of your own helplessness and pain: There is no such thing as strengthening medicine, ntither in tie! earth nor in the waters which are under the earth. l'his is the truth all the high-class doctors kco-v it. As for the others-well, there! the less said abcut them the better. Mr Strong took "strengthening medicines," ar.d what happened to him? Why, he "continued to suffer month after month." Did you ever see" lIo: se made stronger and fatter by spurs and lash-wi ips ? leaving cfE the oats and bay ? I think you have not. And that is what "strengthening medicines" do, and ali they do. So-called tonics are like making a sick man wa k far and fast by kicking him at every other step. Nothing under the sun but digested food imparts strength no drug ever does. And herein is the perpetual success and victory of Mother Seigel's Syrup; it cleanses the system of disease-poison and leaves Nature sweet and free. The stomach then cries, "Feed me," and so power and health come back like the tfieen gl&.S after a chower. Do you see? Mother pr,ci-.tia,s I destroy disease Nature responds, Only du that, and I can take care uf mytelf." The disease is indigestion and dyspepsia. Mr ?trorg bad it and was badly treated. Should you have u, try the Syrup first-not last, tor 1 have toid you why. EXPERIENCE. •London, March, 1892.

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