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----THE FARMERS' CIRCLE.

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THE FARMERS' CIRCLE. (BY ONE WITHIN IT.) The farmers in East Eisex have given their labourers notice that their wages will be reduced next week, although in some cases the reduction will not actually take place until Michaelmas. Ploughmen, who are now getting 12s per week, are to be paid only 10s, and ordinarv labourers will have 9s. In a few instances, however, farmers will pay 10s. Already there are numbers of labourers out of work, and great distress is apprehended for the coming winter. Replying to Mr Jeffreys in the House of Commons 011 Tuesday, Mr H. Gladstone, on behalf of Mr Gardner, said that in the three we"ks ending September 2ud, the number of outbreftk, of anthrax reported had been eleven, eighteen, and thirteen respectively The enforcement of the Provisional Orders rested with the local authorities. The Board of Agriculture had addressed a circular to them, pointing out the nature of the disease and the best means of preventing its spread- ing. A leaflet had also been prepared for general circulation among stockholders, de- n scribing the sympfcnns cf the disease and the precautions to be taken. I'm allowed to kill both hairs and rabbits on my own place," pleaded Mr Henry Allison, of Elksley, Notts, farmer, before the magistrates at Jledford to which the reply was. So you are, but not on a Sun- day." Mr Allison, who, on the evidence of Ambrose Fieli, gamekeeper to Squire Hicksou, had been guilty of taking a hare which his dog had caught in his field, and putting it in his pocket, appears to have been considerably taken aback by this decision. It was presumptively based on the Act of William IV., which forbids "killing or taking game on Sunday or Christmas Dav, or using any dog, gun, net, or other engine or instrument for that purpose, under a penalty not exceeding £5." He was fined fifteen shillings including Cost s. Mr Robert Norman, farmer, Bushey, was summoned to the Mavleboue police court on Saturday for having supplied milk adul- terated with six or seven oer cent. of water. The evidence for the defence was to the effect that on receiving the complaints Mr Norman caused his cows to be milked in the presence of witnesses, and that still the Eamples showed the presence of water. Mr Frederick J. Lloyd, analytical chemist, said he had analysed samples taken straight from seventeen cows, and found them to contain about 8 per cent. of water. This he attri- buted to the hot weather and poor food having affected the cows. The magistrate dismissed the summons, observing that the water was not added." and that the defen- dant was not responsible for tho composi- tion of the milk. The inclusion of Captain Thomas in the newly-appointed Royal Agricultural Com- mission has given great satisfaction in Wales. An Arglesey correspondent writes: —" His (Captain Thomas's) appoin'ment on the Commission has given the greatest satisfaction to all classes of farmers, and I am able to say it would have been impossi- ble to have chosen a better or more suitable man. His father, who was a larg < and suc- cessful tenant fanner in this island, early initiated him into all branches of farming, and having been ever ilJco continuously t-u- gaged in it himsnf; his knowledge is thorough and prac ic *1, in proof of which he is regarded as a safe authority, and con- stantly consulted in agricultural matters. Since be has been agent for a landed estate he has shown every sympathy with the tenants, and worked much for them, and they have every confidence in him. His reputation, popularity, and high standing in his native county are undisputed and widespread. A PROLIFIC cow. There is at present at a farm in Llanwnog, called Tanrallt, in the possession of Edward Reynolds Hughes, Esq., a fine cow six years old last calving, which has brought forth eight calves. When 2-year-old she brought one; when 3-year-old, two; when 4-year- old, one; when 5-year-old, two; when 6-year-old, 2. The owner may well be proud of such a profitable animal. FERTILISERS' AND FEEDING STUFFS BILL. The much talked of Fertilisers' and Feeding Stuffs Bill which is now before the House of Lords, will, in all probability, come into force on the first day of 1894. The Bill in the amended form in which it is likely to be passed is a very great improvement upon the one introduced by Mr Gardner and others. In spite of the most determined efforts of tho authors ot the original Bill to rush it into law in toat form, the stronglv objec- tional parts have been effectively squashed, while several desirable additions have been introduced and accepted. The rejection of I the original Clause B was a particularly welcome alteration from the farmer's point of view, because with it is removed the loop- hole for the escape of dishonest retailers. Instead of being able to throw the responsi- bility upon the person from whom he bought a commodity proved to be inferior to the warranty under which it was sold, or to con- tain inj urious ingredients, the retailer under the amended Bill will simply have the same remedy against the wholesale man which the farmer has against the person from whom he buys. Some additions to the original draft are also valuable. Briefly described, the measure comprises the fol- lowing provisions in relation to the sale of manures and feeding stuffs :-A descriptive invoice is to be given on sale, which will have the force of a warranty; a description of a cattle food as composed of any particu- lar substance or substances will be regarded as a warranty that it is pure, and the sale of any such food will carry a warranty of its! suitability for feeding purposes failure to give the invoice required, or a false descrip- tion, or the sale of it feeding stuff containing any injurious constituents, or to which any worthless substance has been added, will render the seller liable to a fine, on summary conviction, provided that a certificate has been obt Lined from the Board of Agricul- ture by the prosecutor, stating that there was reas mable ground for prosecution, and provided that a person convicted may appeal to Quarter Sessions the Board of Agricul- ture is to appoint a chief analyst, and every County Council must, while any Borough Council may, appoint a district analyst; any buyer of a manure or feeding stuff, or the Council of a county or borough, or any asso- ciation authorised by the Board of Agricul- ture may have a sample analysed, and may enter a civil action againE-t the seller for breach of warranty, provided that the seller, if not satisfied with tue ana'ysis of a district analyst, may have a sample analysed by the J chief analyst.

ANTHRAX.

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THE SUMMEK OF 1818.

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