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I ST. GEORGE'S.

WHAT WAS EXPECTED!

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WHAT WAS EXPECTED! THE political event of the past week was -the chucking-out of the Irish Bill by the Lords. Very little interest was taken in the speeches of the noble peers, and as their I retentions had been freely expressed and cwidely known for a long period, the result took no one by surprise. Their Lordships I -thought the Bill so bad that they made no attempt at "mending at," but after four mi g),hts' talk—it could scarcely be called a de- bttte--they summarily" ended" it. Over eighty days were spent in discussing and obstructing; the measure in the Commons, ifcufc the peers (who claim to represent the tru* opinions of the country) took only a twentieth part of that time in showing their unmitigated hatred of the Bill which will in time to come be considered the greatest achievement of the Grand Old Man. The two speeches which arrest the attention as being true endeavours to state the case in a statesmanlike manner, are those of Lords PLAYFAIK. and KOSEBERY. The former peer showed, in his usual lucid manner, the gradual but certain decline under the present condition, of Irish industries, agriculture, and population. "Conquest had failed in producing submission, severity in enforcing tranquility. a:;d indulgence in awakening gratitude." KSorts to widen local govern- ment had over and over again been defeated, chiefly by their Lirdships. Now, those moderate changes attempted must give place to one more profound, and which would be considered almost revolutionary. The present system had failed to produce content and prosperity in Ireland, and the injection of the Bill could not end the demand of four-fifths of the Irish for Home Kule. Lord POSEBEBY s contribution to tne dis- cussion has been termed flipnant. liut was not the whole thing a farce ? The number of Liberal peers were as but onions in a salad, scarce suspected," and it was with an overwhelming force arrayed against him that he had to essay to convince the House of the necessity of passing the Second Reading. The amusing parts of his speech, therefore (in one of which he compared the Marquis of SALISBURY as toreador in a Spanish bull-fight about to give the fatal stroke), may well be excused. Coercion, he observed, was played out. There was practically but one course open, and that was to give to Ireland that which she had set her heart upon. For his own part he was not certain about in regard to Ireland, And although not an enthusiast about Home Rule, he was of opinion that as a question of policy, it would be by far the best to grant it. The Tories mav strenuously fight against it now, but what was their proposal ? If they had a scheme which would effect the objects in view, it would have the hearty support of the Liberal party. Turning to a point cften referred to by the Opposition that of Ireland's position in case of a war- Lord ROSEBEBY showed that it would prove a groot source of weakness, and the 25,000 soldiers now stationed there would require reinforcing to four times that number, and even then probably prove insufficient. To make Ireland contented, and a hi lp in time of ueed to Great Britain, something besides e..erdon bills was necessary. It must be governed according to the wishes and senti- nients of the majority in that country. The bill now before them was a "leap towards the light,not a "leap in the dark "-a leap towards a more generous policy and a reconciliation of nations long divided. But the Lords have preserved the Empire, and by a majority of three hundred and seventy-eight, have rejected the Bill. If it had been proposed by a Tory Premier they wmld have accepted it. But anything which Liberals propose must be bad. Their "reasons" for the rejection were many, but the one harped upon most was that the country was not consulted upon the Bill. The country has never been consulted upon any bill. The policy of Home Rule has been the one central topis during the past seven years, and the bellot boxes revealed a majority in its favour. If not, how is it that a Liberal Government is in power? The action of the Lords will, no doubt, be eventually productive of good. They, like the Bill, will soon be ended, and a Second House, more truly representative of the people's desires and aspirations shall take their place. The Irish question is once more removed from the Parliament to the Nation. A second attempt will perhaps be made to pass it. (although not at the fearful expendi- ture of time which the Opposition has caused in this instance) but the votes of the people will be again necessary to make the Lords give way. Meantime the Government mean to attend to the pressing demandA of British legislation. An autumn session is to be held and the Parish Councils and Employers Liability Bills art, to be pressed through. JCext year, there are half-a-dozen measures of the first importance which will have to be dealt with. Although baulked in their ehief design, the Liberal party will be un- worthy of its traditions if it does not without .delav, have inscribed on the statute book, the laws which are acknowledged to be both accessary and benificent.

THE LIQUOR TRAFFIC.

THE GOVERNMENT DEFEATED.

WELSHPOOL WATER SUPPLY.

THE FOOTBALL SEASON.

THE CHOLERA.

ECONOMY, A FINE ART.

N EWTOWN AND:LLANLLWCHAIARN…

',"'•TttEFEGLWYS.

HRA y ADR,

MACHYNLLETH.

LLANWYDDELAN.

LLANDINAM.

.CARNO. [

MIDDLETOWN.

BISHOPS' CASTLE.

i LLAFAIR-CAEHEINION.

CORRESPONDENCE.

THE GOVERNMENT DEFEATED.

WELSHPOOL WATER SUPPLY.

THE FOOTBALL SEASON.

THE CHOLERA.