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TRAINING THE COLT. j

REMEDIES.

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REMEDIES. Viscount Helmsley's Committee say the War Office must co-operate as it has never done before it must purchase horses at three years of age, and not a year later, when the breeder must sell at a loss if he is to accept the War Office maximum the authorities must continue to get into touch with breeders there should be more facilities far breeders to acquire mares: there should be free nominations for approved mares to approved sires; while stallions should be bought and placed in greater numbers than hitherto, being registered and placed with breeders on a loan-purchase system. By the term light-horses it will be understood that reference is made only to those belonging to the Hunter type and those animals which are bred on polo lines, but which grow above the height of 14.2. High-class hunters and polo ponies fetch high prices, but they are the exception. The vast majority are difficult to place in the market, for which reason it is not easy to breed to a profit. However, they are the very animals required for War Office pur- poses. TAR BRANDING OF SHEEP. The practice of branding sheep with hot tar is one which frequently results in damage to the wool, says a writer in the November Journal of the Board of Agriculture. When the sheep are branded in the early stages of the growth of the fleece, the marking material, whether tar or pitch, becomes nearly worn off by the time the fleece comes to maturity, and no very appreciable harm is done to the wool. Flockmasters, however, frequently mark their sheep with tar and paint late in the seasoa, and then, when the wool comes into the hands of the woalsorter, the tar and paint marks have to be clipped off. This enters into the calculations of the buyer, and a higher price is paid for clean fleeces. The Chairman of the Home Wool Buyers' Association estimated that the loss in this way is about loz. per fleece, which represents a material item on a large quantity of wool. It is therefore to the advantage of the farmer to see that the branding is done at an early stage in order to avoid depreciation in the fleece. The tar, if used at all, should be used very sparingly. A serious matter ia this connection is the risk that the iron and the tar with which the branding is done may be made too hot, and penetrate through the wool to the skin, causing severe suffering to the sheep, and at the same time destroying the value of the skin for tan- ning purposes. The inquiries which the Board have made lead them to believe that this only occurs in a limited number of cases through gross carelessness, but it is a point which farmers would do well to bear in mind. In some districts of Scotland sheep are some- times branded with a hot iron across the nose or cheek. This is a cruel practice which should be discontinued. Efforts have been made to find a dye or other mixture which could be used in place of tar, but no satisfactory substitute, other than paint, has so far been discovered.

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THE GOVERNMENT AND HORSE BREEDING.

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The Question of Health.

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THE GOVERNMENT AND HORSE BREEDING.