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ARTHUR HUMPHREYS-OWEN. i

THE CANDIDATES' POLICIES.

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Suffragettes at Newtown.

TO THE MEN OF THE MONTGOMERY…

THE CALL FOR A GRAND EFFORT.

THE MOCK PROPOSAL.

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THE MOCK PROPOSAL. THE speeches of Mr Humphreys-Owen are fully reported in to-day's 'Express.' How robust and healthy is the Radicalism they reflect. Every sentence rings true to Liberal principles. Every subject is dis- cussed from the standpoint of a thorough- going Progressive. His deliverances strike the real democratic note they demon- strate a genuine sympathy with the con- ditions and the needs of the common peo- ple they clearly define and distinguish the alternatives of Toryism, and right throughout they partake not the slightest semblance of those cleverly drawn quali- fications which colour the Liberal profes- sions of men whose convictions are more or less commercial. The inspiring force of his Liberalism translates itself into speech that sparkles with the whole-hearted de- light of championing a righteous cause, and the transparent sincerity of his ad- vocacy must command the respect of the veriest Tory in this constituency. We shall hear from Tory platforms by and by that the Lords are hastening to give effect to the national call for a reformation of their aristocratic chamber. We shall have the assurance of the Conservative candidate that Mr Balfour has resolved to democratise the Upper Chamber, just as he has said there will be no tax on food, in direct opposition to Mr Chamberlain, who has repeatedly declared that food taxes are the basis of his scheme. We shall be invited to behold the conciliatory disposi- tion of Lord Lansdowne, who at last bows to the financial supremacy of the House of Commons, provided there is no tacking on to Budgets—provided, in other words, that such another Budget as the last is not sent up for lordly approval. Mr Hum- phreys-Owen makes effective sport with this sham repentance of the Peers, who have never once during the last hundred years rejected a Tory bill. There is an old saying that the gates of privilege are never opened from within. They have always to be stormed from without. That has been our invariable experience in the past, and for the forces of progress to accept re- form from the Lords themselves would be like accepting gifts from the Greeks. We have travelled far since the days when Lord Rosebery dismissed all reform schemes as only fit subjects to be discussed at de- bating societies, and eloquently contended that the only practical purpose was that which aimed at curbing the power of the Peers. The question which the people are called upon to decide is whether their welfare is to be left in the hands of 600 Lords, the greater proportion of whom are admittedly not even responsible for the authority they hold. Is it not a supremely ridiculous situation that seven and a half million electors, whose mind and spirit and will are represented in the House of Commons, should be dominated for all time by a few hundred Peers, who are elected by nobody, are responsible to nobody, who look after nobody's interests but their own, and whc arrogate to themselves the right of dis- missing the servants of the electors when. ever it pleases them so to do ? We have said they are elected by nobody. Upon reflection we admit that that is a slight error. About a ecore of Peers are elected by their brethren in Scotland to sit in the Imperial Parliament, and it is very useful to remember this fact in connection with the Lansdowne scheme, which preserves this titular selection. What happened at the last selection of Scottish Peers ? All of them who had served in the previous Parliament were re-elected save one. The exception was Lord Torphichen. And what was the reason of his rejection ? Because as a representative peer he had the audacity to represent the will of the people of Scot- land in regard to the Budget. How beauti- fully these unbiased Peers composed them. selves on that occasion! This lordly sham of reform will deceive no thinking man in the Montgomery Boroughs, if he recalls the repeated contentions of Lord Cawdor, the present Lord Salisbury, and others, that heredity confers upon the House of Peers an independence" which it cannot ob- tain in any other way. "Independence" is right, and of this kind of independence we have now had quite sufficient.

THE CONSERVATIVE CANDIDATE'S…

MARKET TOLLS AS PROTECTION.

THE COUNTY TORIES HOPELESS.

THE COUNTY CLERKSHIP.

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« DOUBTING" THE CHIEF CONSTABLES…

A HALF TRUTH-AND THE REST.