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. A CONVENIENT TIME FOR LIMING.

HOW THE LUNGS BECOME DISEASED.

START PIGS WELL.

Newtown's Opportunity.

CHOICE OF A BOAR.

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CATTLE-FEEDING EXPERIMENTS…

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QUERIES ANSWERED.

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ROOTS NOT ENOUGH.

TRANSPLANTING FRUIT BUSHES.

The Question of Health.

CROOKED BREASTS.

TURKEYS FOR CHRISTMAS.

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zC14 FOR AN APPLE.

"KEPT" EGGS.

PEN POINTS.

THE CHOICE OF A CAREER.

tteath Sentence Scene.

The Late Dr. Bannister.

BWLCHYFFRIDD.'

CHURCHSTOKE.

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CATTLE-FEEDING EXPERIMENTS…

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the smaller. Each lot of ten thus occupied a row of four boxes on opposite sides for feeding passage. The cattle had no access to water until. the last month of the experiment. It was not in- tended that they should be given water at all, but, at the end of the third month both lots showed so little progress, and the weather being then very dry and warm, that it was deemed advisable to supply the cattle with what water they may require. Both lots, therefore, had water ad lib for the last four weeks of the experiment, and in consequence of this possibly, there was quite a remarkable increase in live weight in both lots during this last period. CONCLUSIONS. From the results tabulated and discussed above, the following conclusions may be drawn —Cattle of similar character to those used in this experiment feed just as well on 31b. of concentrated food per head per day as they do on 61b., when the allowance of turnips, straw, and hay is the same as that given in the present rations. There does not appear to be any relation between the live weight increase in cattle of this description and the actual amount of cake and meal consumed, and an increased allowance of concentrated food over and above a certain quantity results in a reduction of profit, if not in loss. It is impossible to determine from the present experiment what the minimum allow- ance of concentrated food in such daily rations as were supplied should be, but it is clear that having regard to profit, and when made uo of foods of the kind and quality of those used in the present experiment, it should not be much above 31b. per head. It would appear that there is a distinct ad- vantage in giving cattle that are being fed inside during the winter months a plentiful supply of water when the turnips supplied do not exceed 501b. per head per day. not exceed 501b. per head per day. Experiment 2 was with rations with and without water. The specific object of the ex- periment was to determine the effect upon the progress of cattle of a free access to water during the progress of feeding. In previous experiments water had been deliberately with held from the cattle, but the remarkable effect of allowing the cattle in Experiment 1 to have

TRANSPLANTING FRUIT BUSHES.

TURKEYS FOR CHRISTMAS.

CATTLE-FEEDING EXPERIMENTS…