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ROOFING FOR STABLE.

THE SMALLHOLDER'S CALENDAR…

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THE SMALLHOLDER'S CALENDAR FOR NOVEMBER. GARDEN. Flower beds should receive a dressing of manure. Dahlias should be litted and stored away from frost and damp. Alterations in the garden should now be carried out while the weather is fine and the soil fairly dry. Her- 11 baceous plants should be cut out where they have finished flowering. Roses may be trans- planted. Asparagus may ba cut down, and the beds mulched with rotten manure. Keep all dead and decaying leaves pulled off Brussels sprouts and borecole, etc. Earth up leeks if not already done. FRUIT. Plant and prone gooseberries, currants, apples, and fruit trees of all kinds when the weather is favourable. Manure gooseberries and currants, and any fruit trees which have borne good crops. Stored fruit should be looked over, and any decaying ones removed. Trees which have got overgrown with dirt and lichens should be sprayed with the caustic wash. Fork up the ground as soon as the 1 pruning and spraying are completed, taking care not to destroy the surface roots. FRAMES. Bedding plants sue)*, as pelargoniums should be looked over to check any signs of damping of the leaves. Bulbs which have been potted may be stood in the frames till they are to be brought into the house. Seeds of lettuce, radish, and small salading may be sown in cold frames for use in spring, protecting when severe frost threatens. Care will be necessary to prevent damping. POULTRY. The month when winter layers should com- mence work feed geuerously upon two parts barley meal, one middlings, and half a part meal. If the weather is cold add one part maize meal. In afternoon feed barley or wheat. Hatching should commence in order to have a supply of chickens ready early in spring. Feed ducks to encourage eggs, for these are L% very valuable a good ration in two parts bar- ley meal, one middlings, one bran, half a part of maize, and half a part meat. Pen up Christ- I mas turkeys and geese about the tenth of the month, and feed generously. Supply poultry I of all kinds with green food. Provide pro- I tection from cold winds and rain if there is a covered shed anywhere attached to the house, cover the floor with straw, chaff, or I dried leaves, and scatter grain thereamong. DAIRY. Give roots, grain, or mashed meals, or the butter colour will be lighter, and get the cream ripened, and the proper temperature for churn- ing is 56deg. to 63deg. Warm churn before putting cream in, and keep hot water out of the cream, or the quality of the butter will suffer. Bring heifers and young cows into the shed. CATTLE. The abundance of grass is economising the slender supply of good hay. Dairy cows will be turned out during the day, and housed at night. Wait until the frost has gone off the herbage before turning them afield. Horses hard-worked must have more corn allowed them. Bring colts into the team. Tie up cattle for fattening, and where roots are used for this purpose begin with white turnips. I Begin cake and meal gradually, and when animals are used to change of feed increase I quantity given. Sheep will be put on roots, I with a grass run every day. Trim their tails before putting them in the fold, or there will be trouble with covered earth and excreta. Roots are best when picked out of the ground four days in advance. Give pigs a warm bed, and feed with rations of barley-meal and swill. ARABLE. The autumn has been so exceptionally fine and dry that on some lands wheat sowing has been waiting for rain, as wheat does best when put into a damp seed bed. Finish this opera- tion now as speedily as possible. G!ve Plenty of harrowing. Where lays have been broken up it is a good plan to drive a flock of sheep gently over the surface to prevent wireworm. Winter beans may be planted during this week, and a few vetches if required. Mangel storing must be completed, and the clamping of potatoes finished. Aftet sowing is finished stubble ploughing may be begun. If for root crops, plough deeply. Cart out manure if land is dry enough. Clear up water meadows, remove stock to dry pastures, repair embank- ments and bridges, clear out trains and water- courses, trim edges. BEES. Bees should be allowed to remain undis- turbed. Secure the roofs of hives from high winds with the rope and brick method. This consists of driving in a stake at one side of the hive, to which stake fasten a cord. Carry this

VALUE OF LIQUID MANURE.

A Leeds Nurse Advises

SAVE THE MANURE.

CALF REARING.

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SOW FEEDING.

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THE DISCONTENTED ENGLISH-WOMAN.

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IA POULTRY STORY.

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.

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THE SMALLHOLDER'S CALENDAR…

VALUE OF LIQUID MANURE.