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ROOFING FOR STABLE.

THE SMALLHOLDER'S CALENDAR…

VALUE OF LIQUID MANURE.

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VALUE OF LIQUID MANURE. With respect to the value of the urine of living animals from man downwards (writes T.C.S. in the I Agricultural Gazette') it is extraordinary that proof should not be patent to all observers without experimental research. I can confidently assert from fifty years of practice that the urine of all species of farm stock is one of the most valuable manures known to me, and I may add that I was of that opinion before the opportunity of storing some urine came within my reach. In 1856 there were on this farm tyings for eighteen cows, stabling for eight horses, and styes for (say) half a score pigs. No regard was paid to their liquid excrement, all of which was a nuisance unless absorbed by litter. When, half a century ago, additional accommo- dation for live stock was begun, regard to the storing of liquid manure entered into the plan. By progressive steps the system of sanitary drains and the storing in underground tanks of all urine made by in-lying animals was made operative, and, roughly speaking, the applica- tion of all urine direct to grass land is always made before the tanks run over. Wiih this result. Some dozen acres of meadow land are, in my judgment, kept at the highest procurable level of production by liquid manure only. SOME PRACTICAL EXPERIENCES. Let me say at once that the far too common abandonment of liquid manure as a fertiliser is due to the admission of water into the storage tanks. No liquid other than that voided by farm stock should be admitted into the storage tanks, with the exception of the water occa- sionally necessary to flush the drains. Of course I may be told that I am giving no detailed account ot the result of experiments. My answer is: "It goes without saying that urine is a manure the value of which is shown every day in the luxuriance of grass growing upon the patch of land upon which urine has been voided." For forty years a ten-acre meadow has re- received no other dressing than that distri- buted from a liquid manure cart. Although the soil and subsoil of this meadow are only of moderate quality, I have in each successive year had an enormous production from an average application of two dressings from the liquid manure cart. Let me set down the history of the present year of this meadow, which, from the end of December until Lady- day is kept free of live stock. During these dead three months the liquid manure has been over all the field once and a second time over, say, one-third of it. On reference to my milk book, I find that on the night of April 18th last some forty cows in milk lay out in it. This was twenty-four hours sooner than in April, 1909. The meadow is grazed down to the roots as a rule up to the second week in May, and the milk produced from it during these four weeks is very full in yield and extraordinary rich in butter-fat. The crop of hay of this season was cut and carried during the fine weather which preceded the break in July. The aftermath has been enormous in bulk, and, as upual, its consump- tion by the cows is preferable to any other grazing on the farm. No WASTE. The storage in the tanks, made underground with cemented walls of brick, holds from two to five weeks' production of urine, and is never allowed to run to waste, although exceptionally there is only pasture land available to receive it. When applied to pasture land all cattle graze with avidity the rich herbage which comes in thick sward in less than a month. The stock in trade necessary is a tank fitted with a chain pump for each block of buildings, which require a separate storage. The liquid

A Leeds Nurse Advises

SAVE THE MANURE.

CALF REARING.

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SOW FEEDING.

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THE DISCONTENTED ENGLISH-WOMAN.

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IA POULTRY STORY.

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.

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THE SMALLHOLDER'S CALENDAR…

VALUE OF LIQUID MANURE.