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HAYMAKING.

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HAYMAKING. Haymaking is the work of the day, therefore a few notes may be of interest to those whose experience is only just com- mencing. The very small holder who has only a mere plot of grass will do well to cut it—or have it cut-with a scythe but for say, two acres or more it is worth while to use a mowing machine. When beginning a piece it is not ad- visable to drive too near the hedge or out- side of the piece the first time round. The distance should be gauged so that there are two full swaths to cut the reverse way, and after a few times round the first swath cut should be raked back and the outside ones done, so that the hedge-side hay may have a good chance to dry. Very often this is left till last, and is therefore not fit to carry with the bulk. Of course, care must be taken not to drive into projecting stumps and break the machine. When turning a mower at the corner do not lever it up the cutter bar pushes back the grass and clears a way for itself, For the sake of the horses, and also the machine, the knives should be sharpened at frequent intervals, as a dull one in- creases the draught, and causes more strain on the machine, and the connecting rod and eye of the knife should be oiled more often than the rest of the machine. In good weather all that is necessary is to turn the swaths once with a hand-rake in a small undertaking, or a swath-turner if a larger one, and if the work is let to do by hand, Is per acre is about the usual price. Seeds or meadow grass will make sufficiently in from two to four sunny day, but thick crops of clover take from a week to ten days, and during the recent cloudy' weather has laid a fortnight without being seriously damaged. If no machinery is employed, put two swaths from each side on to the middle one with a small rake, making five in a row for carrying but it is not advisable to do this until it is made and ready, unless it cannot be carried, in which case it should be put up into well-rounded cocks to pre- serve. In small fields it is advisable to have a strong lad following behind the pitcher with a heel-rake, so that the whole lot is cleared up, and of the same quality. On a larger scale the Takings are left, as a big bulk is aimed at but in that case no time should be lost before raking it up and carrying it, for the reason that exposure to either sun or wet impairs the quality of the feed.

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