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.a. erystwvth Inlirmary. i .J e, CABKP T MEETING. set* A SATISFACTORY HEIGHT. cfeea sigt !,itO?'JSEi) ^XiENitOX. *t" The anirial wnernl r;f"f,tir.p of Infirmary and Cardiganshire General Hospital was held on Saturday morning last at the Town Ilau. re Captain Cosens, Bronpadaru (president), occupied the chair. There were also present Mr II C Fryer, Colonel Frver, the Mayor (Mr R J Jonos), Mrs Griffiths (Waterloo): Mr and Mr< Isaac Griffiths. Mr John Mat bias, Mr F K Roberts. B Ellis Mor- gan, Rev T A Penry, Rev Griffith Pa:ry (Llanbad- arn) Alderman C 31 Williams, Mr J D Pevott, Mr EdwinMorrisMr\VraMorris(15ort LI) MrDavidJanics, (Penrhyncoch); Rev T Levi, Rev T E Roberts, Rev D R Williams, Rev X laomas, Mr Evin Edwards (Laurels); Mr W R Jones, Mr William Thomas, Mr D Lloyd Lewis (X P Bank) Mrs T ? Roberts, Mr D Watkins, Mr Edward Evans, J.P., Mr T W Powell, Mr David Lloyd. (Portland-street j; Mr Rowland Morgan, Mr Daniel 1 homas. Mr Harry Bonsall, Mr Ww Jotes (Barh-street); Mr Bonner (Penparke); Dr Abraham Thomas (honorary med- ical officer); and Dr Alfred James (house surgeon). ACK XOW r.E or; M EN To. The President announced that a communication had been received from Mr C T Hitchie, of the r Home Office, conveying the thanks of His Majesty the Xing for the loyal and dutiful message of the subscribers of the Infirmary on his accession to the Throne, and also of the expression of sympathy on the occasion of the lamented death of her late Majesty Queen Victoria. The President also said a letter had been received from }bjor Bonsall thanking the subscribers for the kind expression of sympathy on the death of his father. PRESIDENT'S ADDRT'RIRI. The President said it was a great pleasure to him 1, that he was well enough to be present on that occasion (hear, hear). More particularly as they were so kind as to elect him last year as their president in his aosence. He had to thank them for that great kindness, and when lie told them it was 22 years since he had been well enough to attend the annual meeting of the governors, he hoped they would excuse any shortcomings on his part. His duties as president that year had been a pleasant sinecure. He had had an admirable committee of .management; every meeting had been largely attended, and everything had gone on most pleasantly. One idea had animated everyone- that of doing the best for the interests of the Infirmary (hear, hear.) The past year bad been a record year'for the Infirmary in several respects. They bad had an enormous increase in the number of patients. The increase in the in-patients bad been 69, and there had been an increase of 61 in the out-patients. Of course, this bad entailed an immense deal of extra work upon the House Surgeon, the Matron, and the staff. He could not speak too highly of the way they had performed their work. Be knew that the House Surgeon had had a very hard time. He and the matron bad had to take their places at night at the bedsides of patients who were very ill after having been at work all day. It only came to his knowledge a few davs ago that the 11 )ti,e Surgeon had been for the last six weeks or two months obliged to get up in the middle of every night to (-tre,s a patient who was very ill. Or course, be must also say that they were deeply indebted to Dr Thomas for Ili., great kindness and attention (hear, hear.) He had constantly atiendel at the Infirmary, and he (the President) was afraid it must have entailed a heavv loss upon him. He had always been in attendance when required, ar.d they were grateful to him for his kindness (hear, hear.) Speaking of the subscriptions, the President said there was a small increase of about £ 14, in the annual sub- scriptions. The town subscribers had come out very well, but he should like to see the country subscribers come out better. He thought property had its obligations, and a good many did subscribe handsomely, but lie had been very sorry several times to fin(1 people coming to him from a distance of six or seven miles to ask for tickets for admission to the Infirmary because no one in their district subscribed. He would like to see some mora country subscribers (hear, bear) There was a considerable increase in the faying patients, representing an increased income of about £33. The Infirmary had been oue of the greatest blessings to such patients, because some of the cases were serious ones, and the patients ap- preciated the kindness with which they were treated, and expressed their gratitude for what thev bad done for them. In the church collections there was a small increase of £3. The Calvinistic Methodists had come out very well, their total showing a considerable increase, but, as a Churchman himself, he would- say that he would like to see the Church of England show up better in the future. He hoped when these hard times had passed that they would so. With regard to Downie's Bequest, they had jMOO from that fund this year instead of £200. Their expenses bad increased during the year about £250. This was due to the increase in the number of in-patients, and he hoped the subscriptions would be increased next year to meet this addi- tional expenditure. The household expenditure had increased in like proportion, and he was sure Miss Chandler did everything she could to keep it down, as also did the committee. They would find by the statement that the average annual cost per head of in-patients and out-patients was 7s IOid, while the previous year it was 6s 6d. That increase was due in the first place to the number of paying patients who expected to be better fed than the other patients. They were also obliged to have more servants, and these things increased the ex- penditure. Some of the cases were also much more serious than those of the previous year. Many of the subscribers knew that he was in the habit of going to the Infirmary at all times, and he thought it was his duty to state that on all occa- sions he never found anything that the slightest exception could be taken to. He never heard a complaint from a single patient. On the contrary, they were most profuse in their expressions of gratitude. Only the other day a young man who had been in the Infirmary three weeks very ill. took the trouble, is soon as he was well and discharged, to walk up to his place and tell him how kindly he had been treated, and how grateful he was to the Infirmary for all the benefits that bad been conferred upon him. It was very satisfactory to know that the patients were satisfied with their treatment, (applause.) REPORT ASD BALANCE SHEET. The report and balance sheet for the year ended i December 31st, 1901. was next submitted. The report gave the following statistics :-In-pat,ients Number admitted with recommendation tickets, 229; numberaornitted as accidents, etc.. 35; remain- ing from previous year, 17; total, 281. Discharged Cured, 243; relieved, 16; incurable or unrelieved, 5; died, 5; total. 269; remaining under treatment December 31st, 1901. 12; total, 281. Out-patients Admitted with recommendation tickets, 1088; admitted as accidents, etc 229 remaining from previous year, 47; total, 1364. Total number of in-patients, 281; do out-patients, 1364; grand total, 1645. The balance sheet showed that, the total receipts for 1901 amounted to £ 941 14s 4d. The annual sub- scriptions amounted to Z146 17s 6,1. and the church and chapel collections realised P.44 17s 3d. From "Downie's bequest Z275 was received per District Visiting Society. £ 400 for Infirmary Scheme account, and t22 16s Aberystwyth Corporation ( interest), or a total from this source of L697 16.. On the expenditure side E489 Is Jd was absorbed in household expenses, P,154 Is 6d in t'!iey<ii>pensary, and Z194 2s 41 in salaries and waiCes. There were also miscellaneous-expenses amounting to Z64 13" 5id, and extraordinary expenses amounting to IC46 I 15s 6d. The total expenditure during the year was £ 948 Ms Id. leaving a balance due to the treasurers ofr £ 134 7s 6d. the report further stated that the total number Of patients admitted from the Borough of Aber- ystwyth, including Penparke, Khylyfelin, and Jjlangawsau was as follows:—In-patients, 190; out-patients, 1076 country districts—in-patients, 91; out-patients, 288. The total number --)f dtys, in-patients who were in the Institution was 6,895, being an increase of 590 davs over the number in 1900! The average stay of each patient was 24 5 days: the average daily number of patients was 18'8; and the average weetdy cost of diet per bead was 7s lOtti. The average annual cost per head of in-patients and out-patients was as follows:—Fuel and light, Is 2(1; dispensary. Is 10il; -ilary and wages. 4s 8 4 miscellaneous, Os 9t i. "L!) follow- in0' is a summary »f payments made b" 'Trustees of^Downie's Bequest in aid of the 1. 'vmarv:— Salary of House Surtreon and Seoreta • Zt68 15s Od; do Dispenser. £ 23 15s 001 doCW- Trnstcp*. £ 25 0s0d; rates, etc., P,12 11-; 2 1 building. £ 8 0*91. Mr H C Fryer, County Clerk, propose<' the adop- tion of the report and balance sheet He thought the subscribers, bavins perused the r port, and having heard the President's remark up-e, it, would be satisfied that the Infirmary was d. very good work. and, perhaps better work than ha t ever been done before. The numbers of pe ph who now Catlie in were laige« Li'dll e,er' berl'r', and showed what great confidence the people had in the treat- ment they bad at the Infirmary. Some years ago out-patients showed great hesitation to ;o.ne into the Infirmary. 1 "lev objected to .he ',f) having so much air as they got there. many ether things Tiwy now found it was to •••■•it good, n ard the applications for admission were much larger than ever before. Tie on'v d "in his mild now was whether they would tv- ve to go into the question b"f.»-« ,,r enlw -ne !n- firinnry, There had to,en i •• during the past year when the place had b(-eil L The Presi(leiit--It is now. Mr Fryer said it was an tin pleasant thing to have to refuse admission to patients because they had no room. He was sure Aberystwyth, if called ;be upon, would come forward and subscribe libera1!- toward enlarging the building if it was required. He thought it very probable that before long they would have to give a mandate to the committee to go into he question of enlarging- the building. He proposed that the balance sheet be accepted and adopted. Mr F R Roberts having seconded, the proposi- tion was carried unanimously. ELECTro" OF PRESIDENT. Mr II C Fryer said he believed no doubt would exist in the minds of anyone present in regard to this .*u poirtaic-nt. This" time last year he ha pleasure of seeing Capt Cosens appointed to be president, and he was sure everyone connected with the Infirmary owed him a deep debt of grati- or the -itte, tude for the great attention that be gave to the work of the institution. He was. constantly there I and any person having anything to refer to or any 1 L- LL- T.c_ -C' question to asii in regard 10 uie inuiiudi_» «ci.s quite sure to have his wishes attended to with the greatest promptitude by Capt Cosens. He had great pleasure in proposing that Capt Cosens be re-elected resident for the ensuing year. Rev T A Penry, in seconding, said he did not think thev could get anyone more interested in the Infirmary than Capt Cosens who bad been so for many years. His heart was in the work, and the success of the Institution was very near to him. The re-election of Capt Cosens was unanimously agreed to. Capt Cosens then thanked the subscribers for having re-elected him president for the second time. ° The work would be a great pleasure to him, and a double pleasure, inasmuch as lie was able to assist in carrying on the work of his late friend, a Mr Bonsall, who took such a great interest in the institution (Hear, hear). MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE. The President announced that the representa- tives of Downie's bequest elected to -erve on the Management Comnitttee were Capt, Cosens, Mr H. C. Fryer, Major Bonsall, Mr J. D. Perrott, Alder- man Peter Jones. Alderman C. M. Williams, Mr F R. Roberts, Rev Thomas Levi, and the Mayor of Abervstwvth. The attendance during the past year of those members appointed by the subscribers had been as followsNumber of meetings held. 13: Mrs Griffiths 12. Rev T. E. Roberts 6, Rev T. A. Penry 9. Mr D. C. Roberts 2, Mr W. Thomas 10, Mr C. E. Morgan 10, and Mr John Mathias 9. The Rev T. A. Rertry did not desire his name to be put forward for re-nomination on the committee. With this exception all the other members were, on the motion of the Mayor, seconded by Mr H. Bonsall, re-elected, Mrs T. F. Roberts being appointed in place of jlr Penry AVDITOR. Mr J. R. Rees, North and South Wales Bank, was unanimously re-appointed auditor. HONORARY MEDICAL OFFICERS. The President proposed a vote of thanks to the honorary Medical Officers of the Infirmary. They were indebted to Dr Thomas for all he had done for them. and they could not speak too highly of his services. He also proposed that the thanks of the meeting be conveyed to the Honorary Dental Surgeons. Mr Henry Bonsall wished to know whether the other doctors had been asked to co-operate with the present honorary medical officers of the insti- tution. The President replied that he thought the other doctors had saved them the trouble, because they had resigned. If it was the wish of the meeting he read the resolution adopted at the last meeting of the committee. He thought the question was closed, and the less said about it the better. The institution had gone on admirably, and they were indebted solely to Dr Thomas. Of course they could not help themselves at present, but he hoped things would take a better turn before long. Mr W Thomas interposed and said Mr Bonsall did not refer to any particular case. He referred to the practitioners generally of the town. The Chairman—They have resigned their posi- tions, and I don't see we have anything more to do Mr If Bonsall said he did not think the less said about the matter the better. This institution was for the benefit not merely of Aberystwyth but the whole country round, and it was highly important that all the medical men should assist in the good work it was doing. For instance, quite recently Dr Thomas, who was now the only honorary med- ical officer they bad, was laid up with illness, and was incapacitated. Then the whole work of the institution fell upon the house surgeon. The doctor of the institution was as good a man as they could have—he was an able man and they were lucky in securing his services-but for all that, cases occurred when other medical men's services were required. It seemed to him there was very little between the doctors of the Infirmary and the other doctors, and surely it was possible to approach them to enlist their services on behalf of the Infir- mary. In every other institution of this kind the medical officers residing near considered it a matter of courtesy to assist the officer of the institution, as well as for the good of the cause. How was it that the other doctors of Aberystwyth had refrained from attending the institution for many years now ? He thought there must be some stumbling block,which ought to be removed. He would urge the President, who was a man who commanded the highest respect of all the doctors, as well as the laity, to use his endeavours to get the other doctors of Aberystwyth and the surrounding country to give their services as honorary medical officers to this institution. He thought it was time that this old grievance was re- moved, and for the well-being of the Infirmary the doctors should be asked to co-operate. doctors should be asked to co-operate. The President said he really did not know what to say to Mr Bonsall. The fact of the matter was that the doctors bad resigned. At the time of Dr Thomas being laid up, his locum tenens had occa- sionally done work at the Infirmary, and in any case of emergency Dr Harries had promised to come in if required. The other doctors had re- signed, and they could not force them to attend the Infirmary. What, therefore, were they to do ? If Mr Bonsall could explain how it could be arranged, he would be very glad. Mr Bonsall said he would propose that the President invite the doctors to a meeting and put the matter before them. No doubt, some arrange- ment could then be come to. He barl spoken Ao several, and all seemed well-disposed toward the Infirmary. It was the poor who suffered by their non-attendance. Mr W. Thomas thought rule 40 settled Mr Bon sail's point. The President read rule 40. which is as follows » The medical staff shall consist of honorary medical officers and a house surgeon, duly qualified. The honorary medical officers shall be appointed by the committee of management, to wh.m applica- tions must be made. The appointment shall be subject to confirmation at an annual special meeting of governors and subscribers." Mr Bonsall asserted that that was ridiculous (laughter). The thing on the face of it was absurd. Why should the doctors apply to be appointed ? There was no payment for it. If they gave their services for nothing where did the honour of becoming honorary medical officer come in ? It was the Infirmary that got the benefit. The rule was ridiculous on the face of it. The President—You yourself said a minute ago that in most places it was esteemed an honour (laughter). Mr Bonsall replied that they called them the honorary medical officers, and the rule said they must apply for appointment, although the whole of the benefit was on the side of' the Infirmary. He -ic still thought, if the President would use his endeavours to secure the services of the outside doctors it would be for the benefit of the institution. There seemed to be very little between them and the doctors now. Mr H. C Fryer said rule 40 was a rule wMch had been very well fought out. It had been dis- cussed on several occasions, and he believed the present wording of it was arrived at as presenting the only satisfactory wav of dealing with the matter. If Mr Bonsail could bring his influence to bear upon any of the medical practitioners of the town to make applications he could promise that they would be readily granted. Mr Bonsall—Why should they apply ? It is we shonlij apply to them. The Mayor said he was afraid the President had been too generous with Mr Bonsall in allowing him to discuss this matter. If he had any objection to the rule, he should give notice of motion to rescind it He rose to a point of order, as he did not think Mr Bonsall was right in oiscnssing tb's matter. Mr Bonsall—It is not a point of order. I am speaking unon the vote of thanks to the honorary medical officers. The Mayor said be would second the vote of thanks, and then Mr Ponzail could move an amend- ment to it if ho wished. The discuss;,m was about to be continued by Alderman C. M. Williams when the President ruled it out of order. On being put to the meeting, the vote of thanks to the honorary medi ;al officers was unanimously carried. Dr Abraham Thomas, in acknowledging, said be esteemed it vpry great honour to be associated with the work of the Infirmary. A great factor which induced him, nine years ago, to come to Aber- vst,v%-v", was that he would be on the staff of the In- firm- He applie(I during the first three months after he came to the town, and was accepted The work bad aft .r led him the keenest delight and satisfaction, and he would not forego it for any- thing. He meant in the future, as in the past nine years, to stick bv the Infirmary, and do All in his pOlver for it. (Applause). When be first came down *b ere nine vears ago, people had, as Mr Frver had said, nr. confidence in the Infirmary. He had io exert pressure to induce patients to come in. Things had now changed, and. instead of having to use pressure, people came of their own accord, 884 the House Surgeon was often placed in a difficulty in ha\itig to refuse patients, or delay their admis- sion. Not only was that the case last year, but, it had occurred this year already. The other clay, every bed in the Iniirmary. including those in the three private wards, was full, which spoxe well for the confidence the people had in the institution. The;; serious cases which occurred were treated successfully, and he thought great praise should be bestowed upon the House Snr<;«-ft and Matron for their keen administration of the Infirmary work last year. He had given a great deal of his time to the Infirmary, and regarded the work thus done a great oleanure* In viewing the present state of the In- firmary, and the number of patients there, it behoved the governors and subscribers to con- sider what Mr Fryer had said as to the question of enlarging the Infirmary, by building another wing to meet the increased den.ands now being made on their- accomodation. He considered that that wing should be fitted up with the latest appliances, and should have the Rontgen ray-, so that the poor people of the neighbourhood would 1;8 treated equally in this institution as in any other institution in the country. He hoped the meeting would give a mandate to the committee to proceed in that direction. (Applause.) EXTENSION OF THE INFIRMARY. Mr H.-C. Frver proposed that the question of the extension of the Infirmary be referred to the House Committee. who would consider the best way to proceed. They were placed in an awkward position when persons applied for admission, and they had no beds for them. He was quite sure that Aberystwyth would rise to the occasion, and would assist in providing funds for enlarging the building, if required. No harm would be done if the committee was certain if an extension could be made, and what the cost would he, and they could report to a special meeting cr to the next annual meeting. The Rev T. Levi seconded the resolution. Mr Fryer added that there was a considerable amount, of the Downie's Bequest still available for building. By the scheme they were allowed to spend a sum not exceeding £ 5,000. He did not know what had been expended of that money, but a great deal of the funds for the present build- ing were collected. As they would remember, Ladv Lisburne (as she then was), took a greai deal of interest in the matter, and collected a very large sum. He did nor think that more than £ 2.000 or £ 2.500 of that iE5,000 had been spent. He hoped that the money from that fund would be generally supplemented by subscription, and he did not believe they would have any difficulty in getting a sufficient, amount to carry out the extension. The resolution to refer the matter to the com- mittee of management was then agreed to. A vote of thanks to the President, proposed by the Mayor, ended the meeting.

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