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Q University College of Wales…

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IDOLGELLEY.

---London Letter.

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London Letter. [FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.] J London, Wednesday Afternoon. THE QUEEN. For days the Queen has been the one subject of discussion in all circles up here. The latest bulletins were eagerly looked for md the slightest sign of improvement was thankfully noted. For some reason or other all the papers have vied with one another in taking a most pessimistic view of the situation, and the consequence was that the uncertainty and anxiety became poignant nd the public heart sank within it. All classes, whether poor or rich, were equally concerned, and never has a more genuine feeling of sympathy for any person, been exhibited. Ever since the Jubilee cele- brations of 1887 and 1897, the person of thi' Queen has become sacred. Perhaps the mystery which surrounded her, and the grea power which she was known to exercise honorably, accounted for that. But it Bshould not be forgotten that her spotless char- Bacter and the beauty of her private life, learned her the grateful love of her people HShe had been the first to sympathize with '1 the relatives of those who had become victims of great disasters, and her pursq Hwas always open to help the poor and needy, ■The picture of her as a matron surrounded Bby her numerous descendants also appealed to a nation which still holds in reverence the ties of family and kindred. Her loss Bwill be deplored everywhere, and the debt- the nation owes to her will never be for- Bsotten. None, of our monarchs gained SO Hhonoured a place in the affections of tha- people as she has, and none of them liaa left such a spotless inheritance to her children and to the nation as Victoria. It is hard to reconcile oneself to the fact that the Queen is no more, and millions to-day, gdumb with grief, will mutter with the greatest of her laureates I cannot think the thing farewell." H TWO INTERESTING TRIALS. M Considerable interest has been taken in the election petition tried last week, in which judgment was delivered last Monday. Mr Thomas Lough, M.P., who is the head of a great tea business, was made the object of a most bitter attack during his election campaign. Mr Chamberlain excelled hiniself in a letter sent to the Unionist candidate, and rightly or wrongly Mr Lough |lis under the irapiession that, lie suffered ■more than any other candidate in this respect. It may be remembered that Mr Lough and Mr Chamberlain had a very bitter passage of arms during last year just before the General Election. Mr Lough is ■married to a Welsh woman, who is, T ■believe, a daughter of the late Rev John IgMills, of Llanidloes and London. She is Bone of the most prominent workers in the Liberal cause in London, and has ably helped her husband in his political work. fl The other trial is that of Mr B. G. Lake, t one time President of the Incorporated Law Society. He was accused of mis- flappropriating trust monies, and a jury haS now found him guilty. Consecpiently, he, was sentenced to twelve years, penal ■servitude. It is a long drop from the iiotiotired position he held a few years ago, btit it shoulel act us a warning to all people who act as trustees There is no doubt that some radical change in custom is necessary, for the law is blameless in this matter till it simply shews how blindly people will iggact in their pecuniary concerns, and it may ■be that neither a change of custom nor a change of law will hinder persons from running their heads into a noose.

NCORRIS.

1 A SERIOUS COMPLAINT.

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