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AGRICULTURAL NOTES.

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AGRICULTURAL NOTES. During the week progress amongst farm crops has not been very marked, the temperature having decreased considerably. Rain has fallen intermit- tently or every day of the week. and has been accompanied by strong north-west winds at times. What is required is somewhat warmer weather to force on the crops; a rise of temperature accom- panied with frequent showers would be a boon to every farmer. The appearance of the country generally is very much better than it was, and on the whole the position may be regarded as a greatly improved one when a comparison is drawn with the position of affairs a month ago. The condition of all crops in Great Britain runs with remarkable sequence from the fowest point in the south to the highest point in the north. Whilst the former are lamenting over the small hay crop, and are not ex- pecting very great things from corn, in the Mid- lands and North of England the yield of hay and the condition of crops have been and are good and on crossing the border into Scotland we find it reported that farmers in that part of the kingdom are in enjoyment of a prospect so hopeful as is met with in but few years. All cereal crops are far advanced, and will be heavy; one report states heavier in some cases than is desirable, since under such circumstance the danger of lodging is in- creased. In some districts in Scotland barley islin full ear, and an early harvest is expected, whilst oats are luxurant and promise an excellent crop. In Ireland the position is also favourable, although, it cannot be painted with such a rosy colour as the Scottish outlook. Taking the kingdom as a whole, the position is more satisfactory and encouraging than was seemingly at one time possible. THE DROUGHT. Wales has borne the full brunt of the drought. The upland fields in the county of Carnarvon, the pastures of Merioneth, and extensive districts in Anglesey, Pembroke and Carmarthen arc more or less burnt up. In Pembroke the combined effects of the drought and tly" have rendered the prospects of the root crops quite problemati- cal, and in Glamorgan field beans have been nearly destroyed by blight. Of the cereal crops wheat, so far as it is grown, looks best, and barley ranks next, whilst oats are poor. The hay crop is everywhere below average, in some localities being less than one-fourth of the normal yield. THE PRINCE OF WALES'S SANDRINGHAM STOCK SALE. The sale of the Prince of Wales's Sandringham herd and flock, at Wolferton, on Friday, attracted about 1,000 people from various parts of the country, the Continent, and America. About 700 of these were entertained to luncheon. His Royal Highness presided, and. amongst others present were the Princess of Wales, Princesses Yictoria and Maud, the Duke and Duchess of York, Baron Ferdinand de Rothschild, Lord Crewe, Lord Brougham, General Sir Dightoa Probyn, Sir Jacob ilson, Sir Oswald Moslev, the Hon. Cecil Parker, Mr Walter Long, &c. The prize bull at the Royal Agricultural Show, which the Prince sold for 1,COO guineas, was exhibited in the ring prior to the sale. Thirty-seven cows, heifers, and calves made z62,012, an average of over X54 16s. Bulls fetched 91,423, an average of about £ 189; 200 yearlings and full mouthed ewes fetched zES50, an average of E4 6s. Ten rams fetched X189, an average of X18 9s; the total oeiug £ 4,485. The principal buyers included the Queen, Baron Roths-' child, Lord Crewe, Lord Brougham, LoidFeversham, Sir James Blyth, Sir Oswald Mosley, Mr Ernest T. Hooley, of Derbyshire, Mr M'Calland, and Mr Miller, of South America, and M. Bosio, of France. SIX MONTHS OF STOCK DISEASE. The first half of the year having passed an opportunity is afforded of taking stock of the ravages which disease amongst live stock has cre- ated this year, and of forming some idea of the loss which has been inflicted upon the country by the destruction of diseased or suspected animals. The most serious point observable is the extent to which swine fever prevails. We have on previous occasions directed attention to the increase of outbreaks and the greater slaughter of pigs which is now going on. A similar story has again to be told. In the six months ending June 30th, there were 3,247 outbreaks of swine fever in Great Britain, and in connection with these there were killed 44,451 animals. It must not be ima- gined, however, that the whole of these were dis- eased, as all animals which have been exposed to infection are destroyed by the authorities. Nevertheless, it is an immense loss, because pro- baby three-fourths of these under other circum- stances would have been kept and have added to the food supply or to the swine stock of the country. These numbers are greatly in excess of any previous year, and they afford no consolation beyond this, that the fact may be due to a more rigorous inspection with a view of eventually ex- terminating disease. There have been also more outbreaks of anthrax than was the case last year, bar, the number of animals affected has been less There were likewise more cases of pleuro-pneu- monia, but the outbreaks were few in number, only two, though they led to the destruction of 192 animals. There were fewer cases of glanders and of rabies, and no case of foot-and mouth disease. Were it not for the enormous increase in the swine fever figures, the health of the stock of Great Britain could be regarded as showing a general im- provement on comparing the present six months with the corresponding period of last year. POTATOE DISEASE. The first intimation of the presence of potato disease reaches us from the south-west of Ireland, where it is usually found when it makes itself known at all. At present it has not been recorded in Great Britain, but the present atmospherical conditione, if followed by a warm temperature, will not un- likely cause or bring about its advent. Prevention is at all times better than cure, and anyone who has I a crop of potatoes on land whia is favourable to the disease will do well to takest-eps to prevent it. This could be done by the Use (bouillie bordelaise, a mixture of lime and sulphte of copper and water. The proportions used lre variable, but a good mixture is obtained by sing 20 lbs. of sul- phate of copper and 20 lbs ofl;1e in 100 gallons of water. The lime should be m^d in one barrel of water and the sulphate of cop4r in another, then the two liquids mixed togetheoefore application. Some persons add a quantity ( molasses in order, as they believe, to secure beor adhesion to the foliage of the plant. Those 410 do not want the trouble of mixing in this manni can obtain a special concentrated Bordeaux mixturV/hichonly requires to be stirred in water to be redy for distribution. It is known as Strawsonite an is made by the firm which has brought out spraYinrPparatus of various kinds. By applying the ixe early the disease may be kept away, but it is actable not to depend upon one spraying, but to givf second and a third at intervals. The applied of the Bordeaux mixture has no manurial eflfey although there are people who believe it has, 4caluse crops dressed with it have produced a great crop than those not so dressed. The fact is an greased quantity of tubers is taken from the pllL\;s because they are protected from disease, and, able to grow for a longer period. It is simply he maturing of the crop, instead of its growth jging retarded, and eventually stopped, by the \ease. The cost of applying this mixture is eX%dingly small when compared with the differenceln value of the pro- tected and unprotected crop, d as it can be done at so low a cost there is no use for the grower who loses a crop of potatoes Ç-ough neglecting to supply this mixture, which hUreds of experimeuts have proved to be reliable and ffectivj Jugt one word more may be added, [an^hat is do not wait until the disease appears, but <f perform the opera- tion necessary to prevent its ateariiig. MARKING F'NGLIS^MEAT The necessity of marking Elish meat is well illustrated by an anecdote in abrthern newspaper this week. It states that Ashort time ago a gentleman, well known in the. teottish live stock trade, called at a large and wl known butoher's shop in Glasgow and saw l\ing outside four splendid carcases of black-fachc, sheep, with their heads on. Inside the shop, lIever, the eyes of the expert failed to discover ^^jjing but foreign meat, and the assumption 19 the butcher sold the foreign article as the e» Scottish mutton. This is a practice which is no \jfine[] to the canny Scot, but it serves to show 1 something ought to b6 done to prevent this There has been issued this week a pamphle ^jng out a system of marking foreign or C^1 produce. The author is Mr. John I. 'of Whistley, near Devizes, Wiltshire, who Ka^ < evidence on the subject before the House 0 Vis. The methods he proposes to adopt is that .^ages representing beef, veal, mutton, lamb, vew ^lC0T1) an(j pork, must be marked with a wire I seal round each leg, the seal bearing an iwP \on ()f the word foreign. When the carcase -u^ Up the pieces must be labelled with a tneta bearing that particular word. All cheese \de abroad should bear the word foreign l01P^sed jn the cheese which is easily arranged; a_.qj)0Uitry should be marked in a much similar to meat. Cured bacon and hams should Probably these regulations could be Ae(j withont much trouble, and some such oug enforced in the interest of the the consumer. The public will not be so to agree to the suggestion that butter, rai > (ad cream should bear a distinctive colour (re .( suggested), and some other mode of marking ^Mjjave t0 be found to denote whether the pr°^c'is home raised or foreign. The fines Mr. proposes as penal- ties for infringement of these ^lationg are seVere enough to prevent deceptio stepg are taken to carry them out. J- ,e Qne gees aml hears of the way the public Seated, and how pnees of British produce ar cted clear 1S it that the Legislature thing quickly to put an end to jj e

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