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ABERYSTWYTH.

BORTH.

IMACHYNLLETH.

LLANBR YNM AIR.

LLANIDLOES.

LLANWNOG.

NEWTOWN.

MONTGOMERY.

BISHOP'S CASTLE.

GUILSFIELD.

[No title]

CORRESPONDENCE.

MACHYNLLETH PARISH VESTRY.

ME. HUMPH RE YS-OWEN AND THE…

WELSH INTERMEDIATE EDUCATION

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WELSH INTERMEDIATE EDUCATION In a report of the Charity Commissioners it1 issued on the subject of intermediate education 1 Wales it is stated that the scheme for the con- stitution of a central Welsh Board to conduct th inspection and examination of schools claitiiinS grant has been approved by the Committee ° Council on Education, but did not come i° operation last year. It was therefore necessary, continue the provisional arrangements for the PjJ1 pose of inspection and examination of schools financial year ending March, 1896. The report o the Commissioners consists of an extract froi their 43rd report (for 1895). They state that sJ county governing bodies with 30 schools a li- for the grant during the financial year, and they able to report that the conditions of the Trea3Ury regulations had been in every case in which a gra^g was claimed duly fulfilled. These 30 acll0^L represented an attendance of 1,154 boys aud girls in six different counties. Without counti»» the special instructors of drawing, music, and driG there wras, on an average, one teachcr for every scholars—a proportion which compaied favouraW with that in secondary schools outside « Principality and Monmouthshire. The result c the examination, considering the short time majority of the schools had been open. distinctly encouraging; and the heard with satisfaction in several instances of healthy competition bringing to the front, schol»rS 0 exceptional promise. A higher level of attainmef was noticeable in the literary than in the scien subjects of instruction. At present the scll(?L were more intermediate than technical, and t teaching of science was hampered in many cases J want of the needful conveniences and aPPara'flif That the modern side of education was attract the attention which it demanded was shown by substantial classes which already, in schools, were receiving instruction in cheffli^1^' agriculture, botany, physiology, and bookkeep1^ The progress of technical and scienf-ar teaching in Wales will be watched with peCl1'^ interest, because it will be at work under »0. conditions favourable to its growth in thorofl# ness." The Commissioners hope to see the coi° J schools develop on the lines of superadding to second course of secondary instruction, CODIB10? all, some special branch of technical study tive of each. Two cautious, they state, seeiae\.no\ be needed. In the first place, if the county sc was to apply its undivided energy to its Pr°^ug work, the standard for admission into it strictly maintained. It ought not to be necess*1^ as we learn from more than one of the it is found to be, to repeat in it the work of elementary school." The second caution the premature removals from school, of which toP were already some indication. It is a misuse of 4 benefit intended for parents by the establish me It of county schools to treat them as places wherebo short course of finishing instruction may obtained for their children." -+-

OSWESTRY.

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