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í TOPICS OF THE HOUR. It is a curious comment, and oÖè that cannot be dismissed as without signi- ficance, remarks the Globe, that at the moment when the Western world, offi- cially, is jubilating over the signature of the Peace Terras, a considerable portion I of one of the enemy countries is in arms against any sttlemel1 t such as that which affecfce it under the Treaty. From Ana- tolia comes the intelligence of a new Turkish organisation to fight the Greeks and Italians and to maintain Ottoman supremacy in that region. This is re- ported to be under the command of General Kemal Bay, who is said practio- ally to have taken over the government of the oountry at the head of a large body of irregular troops. He is connected with another insurgent leader whose lines of communication ex- tend into Arabia and Afghanistan. Again, in the Smyrna. region a third insurgent army is reported. Obviously, therefore, the Peaoe is not all a Peace, and the policy of the Allies, particularly cf Great Britain, as a Mohammodan Power, will have to be oarefully directed if Asia Minor is to be pacified. The task is hedged about with difficulties, and these are not all military. At the moment it looks as if the reduction of the Lesser Asia might have to be undertaken by way of assist- ance to a Turkish Gover-ment with which we have yet to conclude peace. The Abyssinian Mission which has been visiting England has come to Europe to solicit a continu-anoo of the friendship of the Allied and Associated Powers, and, so far as this country is concerned, this is certainly assured, says a writer in the Illustrated London Neics. It is our tra- ditional policy towards Abyssinia. We have supported her in the past, and we have received support in return—i<n the Sudan and Somaliland—and we are all the more pleased to reiterate now our ancient friendship for this truly remark- able African Christian kingd&m; since during the war it has evinced a warm at- tachment for the cause of the Allies, and nipped in the bud a Pro-German anti- AHy plot inspired by German agents and a Moslem faction in Abyssinia. The re- ply made by King George to the Mission is the real British sentiment towards the Abyssinian people. Commander John Graham Bower, D.S.O., R.N., whose promotion to that rank froin Lieutenant Commander has been announced, is the writer whose sub- marine articles in Blackwood under the nom-de-plume of Klaxon" have at- tracted much attention. Klaxoa," after much active service in command of sub- marines, was appointed in November last, gays the Pall Mall Gazette, to the Staff of Commodore Hall, Commanding the Bri- tish Submarine Service, and he was lent for duty with Admiral Browning's Com- mission, which, among other things, dis- covered the existence in various stages of construction of a large number of U boats. The Earl and Countess of Fingall's elder daughter, Lady Mary Plusikett, is to be married shortly to Mr. C. P. Kirk, 17th Lancers. Irish society is much interested, says the Star, for Lord and Lady Fiogall are among the most popular couples across the Irish Sea. The Earl was Master of the Meath Hunt for many years, and he spends a large part of every year at Kil- leen Castle, his stately home beneath Tara's Hill in co. Meath, where he has extensive estates, excellently looked after. Lady Fingall is a Galway woman, and a splendid rider to hounds. Her eldest child, Mr. Kirk's fiancee, blessed long-d«- ferred hopes on heir appearance twenty- seven years ago, for her parents had been nuvrried nine yeare. The heir, Lord' Kil- leen, who served throughout the war in the same regiment as Mr. Kirk, was born four years later. A woman writes in the Star says: I am told some society women have set up am agency to loao out very expensive frocks for great occasions. The hire of a dinner or dancing frock, costing perhaps from £80 to £100, would be from about seven guineas a night. They have been doing a roaring, top-hole business. Lord Northampton, to the great satis- j faction of his neighbours at Northampton, | intends to take up residence permanently I at Castle Ashby, the family place in i Northamptonshire, says the Queen. So far his military duties have kept him too I j busily employed—first in the Royal Horse I Guards, and during' the war as an officer ( of (he Army Signalling Service. At the I age of thirty-four Lord Northampton re- mains a bachelor, well dowered with estates, for besides Castle Ashby lie owns [ Coinptcn-Wynyates, a very beautiful old I house in Warwickshire, and Loch Luic- hart Lodge, a romantic Scottish seat in Ross-shire, inherited from his maternal I grandmother, the late Louisa Lady Ash- burton. The salvage of the Tours, by blasting I away part of the rocks upon which the vessel was stranded, is the public story of what has been done silently for the past three years by the Admiralty. Perhaps I no methods have been so greatly improved I owing to the war as have those of salvage engineers, the Manchester Guardian says. Submersible electric pumps have been invented, which before were never thought of. Lifting appliances have doubled in strength. Inventions for deal- j ing with gas have done away with one of the great dangers of salvage in decaying corn or other foodstuffs. Diving appli- ances have been gPeatly improved, and the cutting away above or under water of heavy iron plating and the invention of

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- íTOPICS OF THE HOUR.

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