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THE WEEK'S GARDENING,

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THE WEEK'S GARDENING, HINT. TO ALLOTMENT WORKERS. Onions need special attention during the feexfc few weeks if large bulbs are desired. They are gross feeders, and well repay the outlay on manures. Sulphate of ammonia, bonemeal, or nitrate of soda (if it can be obtained) may be used with good effect at the rate of an ounce to the square yard. Peruvian or canary guano or poultry manure may also be used, inducing a healthy though not quite so rapid a growth. Soot that has been stand- ing on one side for a time is a very good stimulant, as well as useful in keeping away insects. Applications may be given about every fortnight for a time, though liquid manure, in weak applications, can be used as often as twice a week. Liberal waterings should be given and all weeds kept down. During the dry, hot weather, late-sown seedlings should be given plenty of water. The drills should be made of a good depth, and then flooded with water. The seed should not be put in until the water has drained away to sony; extent. Seed sown at this time of the year need only be slightly covered this allows the seed to benefit thoroughly by' water- ing if drought prevails. When they are well established, a little sprinkling of some ferti- liser will help to encourage growth, and get the plants growing freely. a • • Liquid manure is a very useful fertiliser, for it is easy to apply, and anyone can make it at home. A tub or cistern should be filled three-quarters way up with water, and then the manure or soot water placed in a bag, or an old pail with holes bored in, and suspended in the water. A stick can be placed across the top of the tub, and the pail or bag hung from this so that its contents soak in the water. During the first three days the bag should be moved about in the water as much as possible, so that the contents may become well saturated and the essences escape. Carrot seed may be sown from now till early August, and good crops can be expected if the right varieties are chosen. Only narrow strips of land are needed, and where early peas or potatoes have been lifted carrots will do well. Digging is all that is necessary, if the ground has previously been well manured. Be- fore sowing, the drills should be well watered, and the seed should be sown thinly but evenly and only just covered with fine soil. The dis- tance between the rows need not exceed 4in. to jin., and when the plants are 2in. high they should be thinned out. In some parts where there is shelter frofn rough winds sowings of runner beans may still be made, and will provide pods during the autumn. Sow in double lines, 9in. to 12in. apart each way. If the soil is dry plenty of water should be given, and a little soot dusted round them will keep away birds as well as insects. When the plants are well up, it is a good plan after staking to mulch along the rows. This saves watering, and will hasten the growth of the plants. The climbing French bean can be grown in tlie-sanie way as the runner bean, and should produce good weps. Sowings of dwarf French beans may still be made. To make sure of getting good crops, peas and beans should be fed with liquid manure, cither artificial or organic. Nitrogenous manures, such as sulphate of ammonia and nitrate of soda, are not required to any great extent, 'as leguminous plants are ablé" to acquire sufficient for their needs from the air, and it is better to supply them with phos- phates. At the same time, to encourage the growth of good-sized pods, pinch off the tops of the climbers and thin out the pods, When the peas are done, do not take the haulmS up by the roots, but cut them down, for the nodules that form on the roots contain nitrates, and are valuable in the soil. If raspberry canes are found to be develop- ing numbers of suckers they should now be pulled up, as they will be making vigorous growth during the summer. Not only do these suckers take away nourishing matter in the soil from the canes now bearing fruit, but they help to weaken the young canes, which will boar fruit next -egson: It is best to pull them up as they appear. It is easy to get small ones out of the ground, but if left to grow it is considerable trouble to get out the many and tough stems. Shallots should now have the earth scraped away from the bulbs, so that they may ripen more easily, for if they are well exposed to th sun they will be ready for lifting all the sooner. It is a good plan while they are ripening to hoe the earth well between the rows, which should be at least a foot apart, and sow some quick-growing crop, such as Tom Thumb lettuces, or radishes or carrots. The seedlings will derive the benefit of the made of the shallot tops, and will not need much space before the shallots are lifted. When vegetable marrows are growing on manure they are likely to grow very quickly, and the shoots must be carefully regulated. If they become very crowded through growth being strong some must be thinned out; too much and very overgrown foliage will only harm the plants by preventing the setting the flowers which open first. Until fruits have formed it is a mistake to give too much formed it is a mistake to give too much water; too little water is less likely to be harmful, though, of course, a little judgment wiil soon show when it is required. When the I fruits are beginning to set well. applications I of liquid manure should be given about twice a week, with water on the other days if dry weather sets in. I A common complaint during the hottest ■ days of the year is that lettuce plants are run- j ning to' seed and not forming hearts. This is often due to failure to give the plants the rich 1 root run they need, but frequently to neglect to supply, water at the roots after the plants I have left, the seed bed. To make sure of get- ting good crisp lettuces during the hot weather, after planting out, they" should be given a good watering, and the tops sprinkled overhead every day. If green or black fly appear, the plants should be syringed with soapy water, but, of course, this must be done j some time before* it is intended to cut them. New strawberry plants should for prefer- be layered in small pots containing a fairly rich soil, and planted in their perma- nent places as soon as they have become well rooted. The pots should be plunged in the soil, to keep them. upright, and to prevent drying up. The runner is secured by a peg or a stone just behind the crown. Runners should not be saved from plants whicft have been in their present position two or three j years, or from plants that have not borne fruit, and not more three runners should be letained from any plant. <

---------THEFT BY SOLDIER…

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