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BUILTH AEROPLANE WEEK.I t..

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BUILTH AEROPLANE WEEK. I t A Splendid Start. jv ,n<Jer the auspices of the Builth Wells and t ^ar Ssmngs Committee the Builth and pict "• Aeroplane Week" was opened on j Ursday last, with the object of securing the jJ^hfcent of £ 10,000 to purchase £ our to be named after Builth Wells. 1%100,11 committee, bent on success, secured ^operation of the managers of the three 3|7| banks, who not only gave valuable advice the best way of conducting the campaign. e forked with great enthusiasm, and when y ^eek is completed the grand total invested ^ie hanks will be a fine evidence of riotic work. The committee also made an th t° the various ministers of religion in (jraw the attention of their congre- l0«s to the great importance of placing all ttioney possible at the service of the r ntry, and to some extent their wishes in this Pect were carried out. The services of a p*jClal speaker in the person of Mr Frederick were secured from the National .| j. Savings Committee, and on Thursday three Wic meetings were held. to gre.it attraction was a model aeroplane «1^^ructed by Mr Ivor Williams, and placed on ^ron* his motor car which was used in e Smithfield during the morning as an office Local War Sa vings Association, and was r2^ed after by Mrs Pearce, Maesllyn Mrs Smith, The Elms Miss Nancy Williams, Unfair" and Miss Goodwin, White House. THE MORNING MEETING. Mr 0. W. Davids (Aberduhonow) presided ther the morning's meeting, which was held on & Smithfield at 10-45 a.m., and made a stirring the farmers to help the. country by iw *u8 the Government as much money as they spare. ^lr Tilney, in the course of his first address, j some very striking and convincing points Place before his hearers, showing why it was g^ssary for everyone to do his share in feeing the war. He first referred to the magnificent results of the Gorseinon cam- He said that at Gorseinon the workers p °ue day produced a sum of money which Presented £32 per head of the population, J* this had not been beaten in the whole Untry as a one da}' effort. This efiort was /^de in the face of great prejudices. In some aees they found that their best endeavours j.^re niet by a counter offensive, which ham- re<l though it could not defeat their aims. A illogical people said, The longer money if ^or tbe war the longer will the war go Coiij ^hat meant that they would, if thej stop the war at once but to stop was to !rVe ill. Would it pay to do that ? Did those rJPle believe that their enemies would, if they them, sit round a table and agree to the they were fighting for ? He "did not. My might agree in words, but did we not that every assurance they had given ghout had not only not been kept but had made with the express intention of not !r>g kept. To stop fighting on such promises to lie down and. plant the enemy's foot "Pou our own chest. Would that do us any Rbod Would that bring the millenium of lIeace' Would that overthrow Prussianism 4"d the military curse ? On the contrary, it ;oUld strengthen all those things. The Allies fighting for freedom of citizenship, the ^ts 0f the people to say whether or not war ¡;Qn:\q be a resource of a handful of great per- Were they going to say, We've grown Ca We want to stop, we can't crush you, we Do tl t prevent your attainment of the low pur- SoSes. the ambition of power which you want, are not going to try any more. We want h0li to stop fighting us, and to meet us and Ise you won't do those wicked things any l¡ ore, If you won't promise we suppose these ^Pleasant things must go on, for we are not to fight for their cessation any longer. 011 must come out on top, be world con- trol's, and have your foot upon all nations to ?^jugate and intimidate them, and make them Ve* to your commercial prosperity at the ford's point V That was the position of What chance had the democracies of 16 World against bloodthirsty autocrats whose '^e dream was power, empire, sway, domin- ion V How could the peoples of the world come to their own unless such autocrats >>ere humbled. ancT there was but one way of ^bling a butty, and that was by thrashing lift y rj>0 s|0p fighting would be to say fare- .eU to all hope of peace and prosperity in these glands. Coming to the question of finance, Mr jl'iey said the Treasury had paid for war ser- ies and war goods, and it would be ungrateful suicidal to refuse to lend back some per- 11 h t6lUage of that money, at an unusually high of interest. Many of the workers now had tl) I Li, money, for the spending of which there no proper market, and therefore apart tv11 :iny impulse °f patriotism it was a duty to r6tIiselves to invest this unused money to the ^t advantage. If the Government did not the money required at home, they would e to borrow more freely from abroad. But would mean the worst national economy, capital and interest would both have to be pi'l back out of this country, but as long as we °rro\ved here from our own people it would not leave our shores. If they saved for their CoUntry they profited themselves. They were aked to start that day and take up war savings to -,tar I J^nificates if they could not spare enough for ^tids. The fighting men were heroes all, while at home were only asked to do this small for which they would receive at least f) Per cent. (Applause). Roger Williams, in proposing a voto of thanks to the Chairman, observed that Mr. avies was ready to do all he could to help in frying this fcerible war to a successful issue. e felt quite sure that the farmers and others wOuld do their part to assist to furnish our j^n with the best equipment available to meet "eir enemy. THE AFTERNOON MEETING. Dr. W. Black Jones presided over the after- nOon meeting, held near the Market Hall, and supported on the platform by Mr. O. W avies (Aberduhonwy), JMr. G. Aj>ps (general ^cretary of the National Farmers' Union), Mr. C. Tilney (National War Savings Com- mittee) and Mr. W. Williams (secretary of the recoil and Radnor Farmers' Union). <5 » The Chairman, in his opening remarks, emphasised the importance of proper organisa- tion of the finances of the country and showed that the collapse of Russia was due to the lack of organisation. Mr. Apps, in a rousing address, urged the 11 el necessity of everyone doing his or her best to win the war. Mr. Tilney said there had never before been a campaign in Builth Wells to raise money to buy aeroplanes. The sum they were aiming at was 910,000, a princely figure, but not beyond the reach of Builth. Having dealt with the material and commercial motives which alone might influence people to buy war bonds and certificates as a very profitable and safe invest- ment, the speaker proceeded to a higher plane, because he said such motives were unworthy an imaginative people whose ideals had always been high. They were part of the British Empire, their welfare was bound up with that of England, their sons were fighting shoulder to shoulder with the English-speaking races and they had proved their patriotism. Wales stood high in the records of bravery her roll of honour was a long one. What need had he to speak of 5 per cent. interest ? It was an insult to the cause. What he must speak of was their continuance of the noble work they had already done in this war against bestiality and slavery. They must help to win the war, which if not won meant centuries of misery, slavery and indignity. Not till the enemy's own people cried Down with militarism down with Kaiserism," would the end be in sight. It could only come by their continued effort, and behind all their efforts there re- mained the need-for funds. Money must be found to pay for all the services of the crusade against ruthless ambition and it was for those who were left at home in safety, who had not been told off to meet shot and shell and bayonet thrust, to do their bit by swelling that necessary total that the great work was costing. There was nothing the enemy awaited with more anxious hope than the first sign of willingness to give in. Give it, Who could think of it ? What of our brave boys, our sons and brothers, who had bled and died, gone mad and blind, or became helpless cripples in the effort to beat the foe ? Was all this to be for nothing, now, when the enemy himself was threatened with civil war and revolution of a disheartened people ? Never! Victory was nearer than ever it was. They must fight on and willingly pay for the fighting. He hoped Builth that day would reach the high water mark of her patriotism, and all the allied nations would thank her when they saw her name blazoned upon the aeroplanes. On the motion of Mr. 0. W. Davies, sec- onded by Mr. W. Williams, a hearty vote of thanks was accorded the speaker and the Chairman. THIRD MEETING. Mrs. Telfer Smith presided over an open-air meeting on the Gro and was supported by Mrs. Herbert Lloyd. Miss Nancy Williams, Miss Hawkins. Mr. J. R. Davies (National Provincial Bank) and Mr. Tilney. In opening the proceedings Mrs. Telfer Smith explained the objects of the local War Savings Association and appealed to those present to help it. Mr. J. -R. Davies announced that over £ IB,000 had been invested that day and that there were prospects of a great deal more. Addressing this meeting Mr. Tilney first showed that the present high prices of com- modities were caused by the necessity of encouraging the extensive manufacture of munitions of war. The country paid a fright- fully exorbitant price for all this, but less than the amount would not have brought the advan- tages we now possessed of thorough and full equipment. The wage earners spent the .money on luxurious commodities the manufacturers of these put up their prices and the vicious circle spread itself over all departments of trade. Money had been flowing over the country in undreamt of floods and most of it had issued from Government works throughout the kingdoms. As the plenitude of money had come about by the action of the Government in the payment of wages and the whole com- munity had profited,-they should give the first offer of it as a loan to the Government. Our liberty, our happiness was at stake our in- dividual share of the cost was infinitesimal. We could all lend something, some could lend a lot. He' hoped Builth would emulate Gorseinon. always thinking of the fate of our land which was in the balance and the re- demption of the debt we owed to our brave heroes who had given life, limb, sight and mind in their country's cause. Mr. J. R. Davies, in proposing a vote of thanks to the speakers, said that the money could be paid into the banks or to the War Savings Association and there were also two insurance companies offering facilities for people to lend money to the Government. The vote of thanks was seconded by Miss Nancy Williams and heartily accorded. Mr Roger Williams, in proposing a vote of thanks to Mrs Telfer Smith for presiding, said that the result declared by Mr Davies was most encouraging, and the thanks of the Committee were due to him and the other bank managers for the way they had taken up the matter. (Applause). They had heard a great deal how in the past people were prepared to suffer to maintain the freedom and liberty for which their forefathers died. Now the country was on its trial, their freedom and liberty were in danger, and it was the duty of every man and woman to do all in their power to bring this war to a successful end, so that when our men came home singing the songs of victory we should be able to join with them and say that we did all we could to help, to win the war. (Applause). Now that they had reached f 13.000, they had good reason to believe that the amount of £ 20,000 or more could be secured. The calling of such a large number of men from the rural district of Builth to the colours had brought the farmers into the war, and once the men of Cantref Buallt were moved they w-ould not hesitate to put their money at the disposal of the Government so as to secure an early victory. He not only wished to thank I\1rs Telfer Smith for presiding over that meeting, but for the assistance she had given him, in connection with Miss Nancy Williams and other members of the committee, during the week. Mrs Herbert Lloyd seconded and the vote was accorded with acclammation. )-

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