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,-PARLIAMENTARY JOTTINGS.

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PARLIAMENTARY JOTTINGS. A. IN closing my remarks upon the Session of 1867,1 shall merely refer to the prorogation ceremony. In times gone by, when the Queen sat on her, throne, supported by other members of the Royal family, Prince Albert on her right hand, and the Prince of Wales on her left, and attended by the principal officers of State, all the noblemen in Peers' robes, the Lord Chancellor in his magnificent Court suit of purple and gold, and the coroneted ladies occupying the galleries, the prorogation was indeed a goodly sight to witness. When the flourish of trumpets announced her Majesty's presence, there would be a stillness impossible to describe whilst the' Sovereign of England walked with grace and dignity to the throne. It is a far different affair when the Parliament is pro- rogued by Royal Commission. No one seems to care a fig about seeing the ceremony. The Commons take no interest in the matter, and it is very difficult to get together even a few Peers, to give anything like dignity to the scene. On Wednesday, the 21st of August, the Commons met at half-past one and the Lords at a I quarter to two o'clock. In the Commons I noticed the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Mr. Gathorne Hardy, Lord John Manners, and last, though not least, the Govern- ment "whip," Colonel Taylor; there were some half- dozen members on the Opposition side, who talked lazily and yawned, as if they wished all was over. Presently there was a cry of "Black Rod," and this official announced her Majesty's will and pleasure that the faithful Commons" should proceed to the Upper House to hear the Royal Commission appointed by the Queen. Mr. Speaker left the chair and followed Black Red; he was attended by about six members, and when they arrived at the bar five noblemen were sitting on the seat below the throne with their cocked hats on, and scarlet and gold robes around them. They raised their cocked hats in recognition of the Commons, and replaced them upon their heads. Then the clerk at the table read the Royal procla- mation in Norman French (a long and tedious affair), which appointed the commission, and as each nobleman was named he doffed his hat and nodded his head, as much as to say, That is me." At the conclusion of this portion of the business, the Lord Chancellor read the Queen's Speech, and declared Parliament prorogued nominally till some day in October, but virtually until February. A copy of the Speech was then presented to the Speaker, who at once proceeded to the Commons; he did not, however, mount his forum, but merely fltood at the table, read the Queen's Speech, and prorogued the Parliament, as had been done in the Lords by the Lord Chancellor. Then the few members present flocked around the Speaker, and shook hands with him, whilst he partly unloosed his wig and gown, as if anxious to get away to fresh fields and pastures new," rather than linger on a spot where he had worked almost incessantly for the last six months. Rather a curious Scene occurred in the lobbies the officials of the House assembled in a cluster, several noblemen were walking up and down waiting to say good-bye to the Speaker and other members of Parliament, and there was every- thing to remind one of school-boy days when we were leaving for the holidays. The last two persons I saw leave St. Stephen's were Mr. Disraeli and Col. Taylor, the ministerial leader and his whip. The Chancellor of the Exchequer almost invariably walks home, and on this occasion, after seeing his friend in a cab, he quietly proceeded on foot up Parliament-street, with a self-satis- Aed air, and even with a smile visible on his counte- nance. As he passed along Palace-yard a few persons touched their hats, and this was studiedly acknowledged by the Chancellor of the Exchequer but I must confess that, personally, he is much less popular than Mr. Gladstone, who when he filled a high ministerial office was invariably cheered by the people. Already new matter is put on the paper for the forth- coming Session of 1868, and perhaps one of the most im- portant to the legal profession which has been intro- duced for some time is that by Mr. Grant Duff, who de- sires To call attention to the Report of her Majesty's Commissioners upon the Inns of Court and Chancery, presented to the House in 1855 and to move, That in the opinion of this House the four Inns of Court should be united in one University, which should be capable of giving to English law students a legal education not less complete than that which is given to French or German law students by kindred institutions in France and Germany." With these few remarks I make an adieu to my readers until next year, when I hope to give some in- teresting records of what will occur in the last Session of Parliament under the old regime. Early in the year 1869, it is probable, candidates will be seeking to be representatives of the people under the vastly enlarged system of representation.

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