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OPINIONS OF THE PRESS. 0 PROPOSED EXPEDITION TO ABYSSINIA. We feel no doubt whatever that, if the word goes to Calcutta that the captives are to be released by main force, the Indian Government and its able servants will find a mode of doing it, and plenty of aspirants for the honour. One thing we deprecate. We implore Lord Stanley and Sir Stafford Northcote not on any account to allow the Horse Guards or War Office, or both, to have anything to say in the matter. If the thing is to be done, the Indian Government can do it. Our be- wildered and distracted establishments at home would only "meddle and muddle," bringing death on the prisoners, and discredit on British arms.-Sunday Gazette. Let us look the thing steadily in the face. Let there be no delusion about demonstrations made on the coast or assistance to be obtained from the intestine divisions of Abyssinia. If we are to attempt this enterprise at all, let us fiist put out of our heads any childish notions about mock demonstrations on the coast and cheap bloodless victories obtained by shaking our sword at the distant enemy. Nothing can be at once more weak and more mischievous than to distract the public mind from the true importance of the decision which has to be made by such idle conceits. We sincerely trust that the notion of calling in the aid of Egypt, or of relying on the help of any rebellious party in Abyssinia itself, has utterly passed away. The fate of the Mexican expedition ought to be quite enough to put a stop to all such schemes for at least a generation. If we are to do anything, let us keep steadfastly to our one sole object-the rescue of our fellow-countrymen. That, at all events, we understand. It is definite-it has a beginning, an object, an end. Once we suc- ceed, once we fail, the thing is over and done. So many men have been killed, so many widows and orphans have been made-we have the whole extent of the calamity before us, and that is all. But once we call in allies to our side, once we admit any purpose but the one to our councils, there is literally no horizon before us; no man can say where our responsibilities, dangers, and calamities are bounded. Let us have the courage and sense to weigh the matter fairly. If the expedition has any hope to warrant it, then our soldiers have but to take their chance. But we utterly protest against a hopeless expedition being put up, like a stage play, for the sake of the dramatic effect. We pretest against giving the bodies of our soldiers to feed the vultures of Abyssinia, in order that the Mecca pilgrims may admire the bravery of England. --ivorning Star. THE LORDS' AMENDMENTS. The Commons, who during the last fortnight had per- suaded themselves that their work for the year was done, and two-thirds of whom had betaken themselves to better air and quieter associations than those of West- minster, are already summoned back to town to take part in the final struggle of the Session. Men thus re- assembled are not likely to meet in the most placid mood, and there are circumstances connected with the occasion of their recall which may well justify a peremp- tory tone and unyielding temper. We do not profess to believe that the introduction of the new device of limited voting in the counties and towns which return three members is of that essential importance which its more enthusiastic advocates and more vehement opponents persuade themselves. The fact that Mr. Gladstone and Mr. Disraeli concurred in opposing it when urged by Mr. Lowe, and that Lord Russell and Lord Stanhope concurred in supporting it when brought forward by Lord Cairns, sufficiently disposes of any supposition that it is of party moment. What its fate may be when again mooted next week in the Represen- tative Chamber we cannot tell; and, to say the truth, we cannot think it very material to inquire. But for the large towns the maintenance of the lodger franchise as originally adopted is essential; for the Scotch and many of the English counties the restoration of the copy- hold qualification to X5 is all important and for the purity and independence of every contested constituency in the United Kingdom the rejection of the pestilent scheme of private voting by papers, instead of public voting by word of mouth, is a point so critical that with many it is already set in the balance as a counter-weight to the worth of household suffrage.-Eixaminer. It would be a great misfortune to diminish election contests. They are attended, we grant, with unpleasant- ness and inconvenience, but they clear the political atmosphere and keep up the political life of the country. As Mr. Cobden once said, the right way for a political minority to get represented is by converting itself into a majority through the force of argument and conviction. Whether it is successful or not the effort involved in such an attempt is beneficial both to those who make it and to those against whom it is made. But there will be very little temptation to make it if the minority is always sure of its share of the representation. The result must be to promote in our largest con- stituencies a state of decorous stagnation, which may be very pleasant to those whose fastidious tastes are shocked by the roughness and the as- perity of an election contest, but which we do not believe will be equally calculated to promote the healthy and energetic action of public opinion. While we do not agree with Lord Malmesbury's objec- tion to this proposition, simply because it is "new- fangled," we must say that in coupling it with the grant of three members to the large towns, there is an awk- ward appearance of taking away with one hand what is given with the other. Although the number of mem- bers sent by each borough will be increased, their weight in the councils of the nation will be diminished, because as the representation will in nearly all cases be divided, the town will virtually count only one instead of two on a division. That is not a result with which their inha- bitants are likely to remain satisfied and although we shall certainly not be surprised if the House of Com- mons assents to the amendment, we do not believe in the permanency of an arrangement which is inconsistent with our previous political habits, and is at variance with our political instincts.-Saturday Review.

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