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INSECURE SCAFFOLDING.—An inquest was held on Saturday, before H. Cuthbertson, Esq., on the body of Richard Curtis, who met with his death through the giving way of some scaffolding erected for the purpose of building a new stack at the Morfa Colliery. It appears that the men were at work at a height of ninety feet from the ground when the scaffolding broke under them, and the deceased, in trying to save himself, got on the stack wall, became frightened, and fell over the outside to the ground. A verdict of ac- cidental death was returned. CRUSHED TO DEATH.—Another inquest was held before the same coroner on the 27th ult,, on the body of a child named TV*. Morgans, who was crushed be- tween some laden trams, near the tin works, at Aber- avon. The little fellow was playing on the road, and in running from his companions he rushed in between the trams, part of them crossing his breast after he had been crushed and had fallen under the wheels. A verdict in accordance with the evidence was returned. THE SUSPECTED POISONING CASE.—A telegram was received on Monday from Professor Herapath, who has had the analysis of the stomach and viscera of the late Margaret Taylor, stating that he had found phos- phorus in the intestines forwarded to him. The case appears to be more mysterious than at first supposed. Mr. Herapath's evidence will however be given at the next meeting of the jury, and it will probably clear up the circumstances, which now appear so suspicious, in reference to the death of the unfortunate woman. FUNERAL OF W. T. MORGAN, ESQ.—We give in another part of this day's paper a full report of the inquest on the body of the above gentleman. His remains were taken to their last resting place in the Summerfield burial ground on Tuesday, and although the funeral was strictly private, the mayor and cor- poration paid their last tribute of respect to the deceased gentleman by attending the funeral in pro- cession. The shops were partly closed in the town, and other marks of respect were shown by the inhabi- tants generally. The funeral cortege was arranged in the following order:— The Borough Police, craped on left arm. Superintendent Phillips. The Mace-bearer with maces craped. The Corporation, two abreast. THE HEARSE, Containing the Body, enclosed in separate shells and black cloth coffin, bearing the simple inscription, TV. T. MORGAN, AOED 63. The Mourners and followers. An immense number of people assembled in the neigh- bourhood of the deceased's late residence, and they remained till the return of the funeral party, his sud- den and untimely death being the chief theme of conversation. CONCERT. —Montem Smith, Edith Wynne, Mrs. Davies, and other talented artistes, have announced a concert, under the patronage of the member for Brecon, H. Gwyn, Esq., S. Gardner, Esq., Mayor, and the Mite of Neath, for Saturday evening next, at the Town- hall. The names and well-known talent of the per- formers will be sure to draw a house full." We shall duly report the performance, and the reception of the welcome strangers." SPURGEON OUT-SPURGEONED. On Sunday last, a little knot of people, three men and two women, had collected (by dint of singing, or rather attempting to sing) a few children and adults, opposite the garden of the Neath Union. One of the party, a strange- looking individual, evidently the Mercurius" of the party, then commenced a phillipic against what he termed" forrums of praise," cheerches" and" paar- sons" in general, challenging "the freeinds of the deevel" to take his part if they dared, condemning all who didn't thought as he thinked" to the judg- ment of thelar and the te-sst-temeny," and practically illustrating his shifty language by the most lively movements over one of the fire plugs, as he warmed in his original eloquence. We offer no opinion as to the necessity of such mockeries of religion on Sunday evenings, especially when so many places of worship are open, where at least politeness is not outraged by such personalities as street preachers too often in- dulge in. THE "PRINCE OF WALES" THEATRE.—This estab- lishment was patronised by the cricketers on Thursday and Friday evening last. The company is respectable and well-conducted, and a change of performance takes place every evening. We are informed that the characters are generally well-sustained, and that good order is insisted on among the audience by the mana- gers. The immense concourse of idlers, however, who loiter about the boothing and amuse themselves by stone-throwing, are a great annoyance to the passers- by, and a fruitful source of damage to the opposite buildings. GARDEN ROBBERIES.—As the fruit season advances these little matters" are becoming more frequent. Mr. Bartlett detected one young urchin in the act on Monday night, and Mr. Evans, of Greenway House. caught two fellows robbing the fruit garden in broad daylight. Lantwit Cottage appears to be common property, and handkerchiefs full of fruit are openly carried from the garden. "THEY MANAGE THESE THING3 BETTER IxFRASCE. We give a full report of the grand cricket match in another part of to-day's paper. We have omitted to state, however, that the police arrangements under Supt. Phillips were as usual admirable, excellent order and not the slightest confusion being visible all through the two days' play. Without presuming to interfere in these matters, it is but just to appeal to the liberal and generous members of the club, who so thoroughly enjoyed the play and the good order referred to, as to whether it would be more than an act of justice to acknowledge in some pecuniary sense the obligations they are under to the police officers. It is but right to state that it often happens that men after a night's duty are compelled to do a day's ser- vice extra, for which no acknowledgement is made. We are led to these remarks by observing that during the athletic sports on Whit-Monday the police stood several hours drenched to the skin by the pouring ram, without receiving any refreshment or extra pay! and at the late cricket match no acknowledgment of any kind was made for their services. We feel sure that a moment's reflection will convince the gentlemen of the club that though the police officers cannot share the honour of beating a "crack" club in a game of cricket, they at least feel deeply interested in the suc- cess of the members, and are certainly deserving of .some slight acknowledgment every time their extra services are required. Our remarks are written simply in justice to a deserving body of men. THE GRAm CRICKET MATCH.—NEATH AGAIN VIC- TORIOUS !—The uncertainty of the noble game" was never more clearly shown than in the issue of the two days' match between the Clifton eleven and the Neath and Cadoxton club, on Thursday and Friday last. The result of the firM innings was in favour of the Clifton men by 35 runs, the careless fielding of the Neath eleven permitting runs to be made off catches and short hits in a most easy manner. As usual, however, the style of play was watched and profited by in the second innings by them, the full score showing the excellent play of the Neath eleven both for and against the Clifton during that innin°*s. We think it worth recording that the fastest bowler in England, not excluding Tarrant, was on the Clifton side, viz., W. W. Barber, and also the underhand slow, F. Townsend. Barber, however, took no wickets, and Townsend only four in the first innings and two in the second, the Clifton men admitting that they had never batted to better bowling, nor seen I better fielding than that shown in the Neath second innings." 1st Innings. CADOXTON. 2nd Innings. W. L. Holt, c Aliddleton, b Grace 0 c and b Pullin 10 W. Richards, b Pullin 5 bowled Pullin 3 J. Lovering, c Middleton, b Pullin.. 0 bowled Pullin 4 Major Lee, c Ware, b Pullin 10 bowled Grace 5 "D.G.Thomas, c. Middleton,bPullin 0 bowled Pullin 0 H. Arthur, c Pullin. b Townsend 2t; c and b Gracc 5 J. Westren, bowled Pullin o 1 b w, b Townsend.. 0 P. W. Flower, b I". Townsend 11 bowled Pullin 20 J. T. 1). Llewelyn, c Bernard, b F. Townsend 13 c Boden, b Pullin. 9 W. Whittington, b F. Townsend 6 not out 4 G. J. May, not out 4 bowled Townsend." 16 9 Byes, &c ]. 7 S6 83 Run. at Fall of each Wicket.—1st innings 0 for 1, 1 for 2, 7 for 3, 7 for 4, 22 for 5, 25 for 6, 57 for 7, 66 for 8, 76 for 9,86 for 10. Second innings 16 for J, 25 for 2, 25 for 3, 30 for 4, 32 for 5, 39 for 6, 66 for 7, 67 for 8, 74 for 9, S3 for 10. Analysis of Bowling.—First innings: Llewellyn—t.b., 77; r., 41; in., 5; wkt«.,4. Lovering—t.b.,84; r. 34; in., 4; wkts.,0. Holt-t.b., 48; r., 20; m., 2; wkts., 1. Arthur—t.b., 40 r., 25; n '2 m.,0; wkts., 4—Second innings Holt-t.b., 68; r., 10; m., 13; wkts., 5. Arthur—t.b., 61; r., 17; m., 9 and 3 wkts., 4. 1st innings. CLIFTON. 2nd innings. F. G. Burmester, b Lk-welyn 9 c Westren, b Arthur 0 I). Bernard, runout 15 bowled Arthur 2 C. K. Pidlln, c Lee, b Llewelyn 12 c Arthur, b Holt 1 F. G. Grace, e Arthur, b Llewelyn. 7 c Westren, b Holt 9 F. Townsend, e May, b Arthur 36 bowled Arthllr 4 "W. W. Barber, c Richards, b Arthur 25 c Leo, b Holt 0 W. G. Warne, b Holt 6 bowled Holt 0 E. C. Austin, b Arthur 7 bowled Arthur 9 T. A. Middleton, c Westren, b Arthur 0 not Out 0 H. Boden, not out 3 bowleclHolt 2 J. A. Ware, b Llewelyn 0 runout 0 Byes i Leg-byes 3 „ 121 3Q Runs at itui 01 e&eh Wicket.First innings 22 for 1, 26 tor 2, 34 for 3, 40 tor 4, 89 foro, 98 for 6, 100 for 7, 109 for 8, 121 for 9, 121 for 10. Secona innings; 3 for 1, 3 for 2, 4 ford, 17 for 4 19 for 5, 19 for 6, 25 for 7, 26 for 8, 28 for 9, 30 for JL0. Analysis of Bowling.-—First innings F. CTrace-t.b., 96: t. 30; m., 12; wkts., 1. PL,Uin-t.b., m., 7; wkts' 5 Barber—t.b., 24; v., 6; JJ1., 3; wkts,, 0, Townsend—n.b., 1; t. b., 513 r., 18; m., 5; wkts., 4.—Second Innings: F. Grae- t.b.ä; r., 26; m., 3; wkts., 2., Pullin—t.b,, i2; r 32; m., 19; wkts, e. Barber—w., 1; t. n., 28; r., 4; Ill., 4; wkis,, 0. Townsend—t.to., 36; r., 14; m., 3; 2. Mr. Holt we;at in with W. Richards to the wickets first, and the former mis caught at short slip off the first ball by Middleton. Lowering followed suit—two iaen out iot one rwj. A fast -bumper" cleaa howled W. Richards for 5, the telegraph showing three men out for 7 runs. D. G. Thomas put a ball into Mid- dleton's hands at same place again. Major Lee and B. Arthur now made a stand, and the bowling was changed, one of Townsend's slows gently lifting the bails off B. Arthur's wicket, after a well-played score of 28, including a splendid hit for 5. Major Lee made 10, P. W. Flowers, Esq., 11, and J. T. D. Llewelyn 13, the only double figures of the innings. Mr. Holt stood for 10 in the second innings, when he was cleverly caught and bowled by Pullin, who took Richards's and Lovering's wickets in succession. Mr. P. W. Flower made a splendid hit for 6 during his cleverly played innings of 20, and Mr. G-. J. May scored 16, exhibiting some very cautious play to the oft-changed bowling given him. The first Neath innings of 86 against the 121 of Clifton caused a great deal of heavy speculation to take place. Those who knew the skill and usual "pull up" of the Neath second innings generally offered long odds on them, as much as C50 to £ 5 being offered as a bet that they won the game. Friday's play commenced with Neath going to the wickets, and completing their second innings for 83. Clifton had only 48 to get to win, and the clever batting of their first innings made con- quest seem sure. The" lion hitter," however, F. Townsend, went out for 9, a shooter from Holt re- moving his timbers, after making the best score of the second innings as well as of the first. The last wicket fell for 30 runs, the Neath men appearing to be per- fectly ubiquitous when the ball was struck, so that actually runs were lost through fearing to venture. The fielding was certainly faultless during the time the Clifton men were out, and the excellent placing of the team by the captain deserves special notice. The attendance on the ground of carriages and the gentry of the neighbourhood was very large, the Gnoll road being crowded with spectators anxious to witness the "renowned eleven" play with their "equals." The lookers-on were perhaps more demonstrative in their approval of the Neath efforts than they were of the Clifton science—a pardonable fault when the intense excitement as to the issue of the game is taken into consideration. ACCIDENT TO A Boy.-L--On Saturday a serious acci- dent occurred to a youth named Samuel Griffith, son of Mr. D. Griffith, of Prospect.place. It appears that, in company with others, he was playing with an iron trap-door, attached to a street hydrant, near the Union, and an alarm being raised that some one was coming, his companions hastily closed the valve door, cutting the third finder of the boy Griffiths's hand clean off. Medical aid was procured and the stump dressed, but the bruises on the other part of the hand make the consequences doubtful till the inflammation subsides. MAD DOGs.-An order has been issued, signed by the Mayor, warning all persons not to allow their dogs to be at large without a muzzle, under penalties for so doing. The disappearance of many annoying curs has been the consequence, but the order is openly disregarded in many instances, and no notice is taken of the neglect. MARKET ITEMS.—Wednesday was fair day, princi- pally for horses, although rather fewer than usual were on the ground. Cattle were in excess of the demand, prices being well maintained, and but few abatements made. Sheep and pigs in unusual num- bers, and at a slight decrease in quoted prices. The general market was well stocked, but buyers were scanty, consequently prices were lower than first quotations. Averages English fruits, plums, green- gages, &c., at 2s. per hundred currants, 3d. per lb. raspberries and strawberries, 4d. per lb.; butter, Is. Id. to Is. 4d. per lb.; fowls, 2s. 6d. per couple ducks, 2s. 6d. to 3s. 6d. per couple; potatoes (English), 8s. per cwt. ditto (foreign), 7s. per cwt. other vegeta- bles lower in price than late markets have been. Towards three o'clock the attendance of buyers and sellers became very limited, the gTeat attraction of the Crymlin Burrows having proved too much for the business folks to withstand. THE NEATH EXCURSION TO BrECO-.N-. -Saturday, the 10th of August, is the day fixed by the Oddfellows' lodge for their excursion to Brecon. The fare is nominal, and the trip one that will allow eight hours amidst the lovely scenery of the Beacons and neigh- bourhood. The proposed arrangements are so admir- able on the part of the railway authorities that we hope the treat will be taken advantage of by many who object to excursions generally on account of inconvenience and overcrowding, every precaution having been taken to make the affair a pleasure party in every sense of the word. VOLI'NTEER PRIZEMEN.—We correct our notice <f the volunti-er p' iz men belonging to ihe Neath com- pxiiy, 15th and I it'), I'tibl'st-d in our last, t-d-ion. Corporal W. Briiiit-, 15th, piize of £ 8, at second short range. This gentleman also holds the cup won in hrec successive vars at the long ratine competition. Private W. H. Sell, 15th, All Comers' piize of t7 Corporal Hopkins, 4ih, short rancre, £5 prize Cor- poral Gregory, the Ladies' Prize of £ 6. ST. DAVID'S CHURCH — ORDER OF SERYICES,-ith Sunday aft, r Trinity Gloria, Houldswoth 1Venite, Turner, 9 Te Deum, Cooke, No. 7A Jubilate, Jones, 4A.; Tal is's Kyrie; hymns 204, 173. Evening serviep Hou'd-sworth's Cantate, No. 5A Nunc Dimittis, No. 8 hymns 164, 239, 109. EARLY HARVEST.—A field of wheat, belonging to xlr. lied wood, of Cae Wern House, near tho Vale of Neath station, was cut and partly carried during the past weel;. THE FETE AT THE Burtno Nv. A fete champetre, tea uaviy, and concert, b thi- Z,mr choir, HSMSted by Mr. H. illiarr.s and Mr. H. Morgan, took place at the Jersey Marine Hotel Assembly Rooms, Cryrnlyn Bu-rows, on Thursday. Thu a'tendance was little short of incredible, and the trains were crowded to aiid ri-o during the wli,.Ie if the day. We have not -pace to entl-r into particulars respecting the pro- ceedings, but we finit ro..m to protest against the ileetin., of a religious body for a gooeY caUSfJ being taken advan'age of by some sporting adven urers, who issued a bill, head, d Short Notice," "Races for Ponies," "Stake-, £ 25," &c,, on the same d-iy, time, and place, as the fete was announced for. We shall refer to the subject in our n"xt impre sion, and give some important details in reference to it. WORTH KNOWING.—Ttiat although many thousands of ppopte passed through Neath, attended the fair day and market, vMled the Burrows to see the review, and m,-t friends from various parts in the town, not a -iog Ie case came before the magistrates, nor was there a street row or brawl of any kind throu-h drunkennt-s*, consequent on the day's excitement. The fact speaks vo umes, and requires no additional comment from us. PETTY SESSIONS, FRIDAY, before H. GWYN, Esq., and Hey. W. GRIFFITHS. ASSAULT CASES. Thomas was charged with an assault on Mary George. The case was a very trivial one, and the magistrates dismissed it with costs. Thomas Morgan was summoned by Geo. Archard for an assault. Mr. Jenkins, of Bridgend, appeared for the defendant, who pleaded not guilty. This case was also of so puerile a character that the magistrates dismissed it with costs. Defendant's ex- penses allowed, but not advocate's fee. DRUNKENNESS. Henry Powell pleaded guilty to being drunk, and was fined 20s. and costs. BASTARDY.—Anne Williams charged WilliuM Jen- kins with being the putative father of her illegitimate child. Defendant appeared, but denied paternity. Complainant stated that Jenkins was her cousin, and came to see her as her sweetheart, though he lived eight miles away, and that he had told her before the child was born that she had better put it in the poor- house, if she had no one but him to look to. She called David Anthony, who said he lived at Aberdulais, and used to see the defendant coming and having tea with the complainant, and they then went out for a walk, and came in again together after about an hour or more had passed; this happened some time ago,— about seven or eight months. Defendant said he had offered her 2s. a week, or to take the child altogether, but she refused. The magistrates made an order for 2s. 6d. per week, 10s. midwife, and costs. r.. WILFUL DAMAGE.—Ann Rowlands charged William Joseph with wilful damage. Defendant pleaded not guilty. Complainant, on being sworn, said I keep a little shop at Cadoxton; defendant came in on Saturday night, 13th July, and began to quarrel with another man in the house he dragged him out, and when the young man got in again, I shut the door and locked it; defendant then kicked the panels in, and it would cost 4s. to repair it; lie broke five bot- tles, and also destroyed the lozenges in them; he was not drunk I kept the young man and his step- father in till half-past one o'clock for their protection. Complainant called Mary Lewis, who deposed that she saw the defendant kicking the door after he was turned out, and she also saw the lozenge bottles de- stroyed. George Broom, the young man in question, gave corroborative evidence. For the defence, defen- dant said I was not inside the door Broom was at the door when I came up, and he made motions at me I went down to him when ho "let fly" at me, and when I "let fly" at him, lie ran away and shut the door. William Be van denied that defendant was in- side the door. The Bench considered the evidence conclusive, and fined defendant 12s. for the damage, 2s. 6d. fine, and costs. THE NOTORIOUS GOLD-STREET CASE.—This case was settled out of court, neither party appearing. AXOTHER ASSAULT CASE. Eiiuito IIoicclls was charged with an assault on Hannah Dorey. Mr. Dixon appeared for the defendant. Complainant de- posed that she sent out two of her little boys to clean knives by the door, and the defendant's grandson went out to play with them.- The boy was twice fetched in, but went out again, and she used foul language to complainant's boys when she fetched the I boy in the third time; complaiftant then asked if Jier boys were not as good as the defendant's, when she replied, You are rotten yourself," and then fetched a pitcher of water which she flung over the com- plainant, and said, Stop you I'll do very well with you," at the same time lifting up the pitcher to strike her; complainant defended herself as well as she could, but received the contents of two buckets of water besides the pitcher; nothing was done to the defendant; she admitted to the officer that no blows had passed.—Cross-examined There was no jealousy between me and defendant she cleans the offices; I never accused her of carrying tales to my husband's masters; he has been in their service twenty-two years; he has not had notice to leave owing to this; I never called her a yellow old devil," nor a for- tune-teller from the Cymla," nor a "witch;" I did not say to Ann James "do you want your fortune told,—here is the old gipsy from the Cymla." Com- plainant called Mary Morris who confirmed her state- ments, as did also Ann James.—Mr. Dixon, for the defence, called Daniel Jones, who said he lived in Fairyland," a few hundred yards from the place of the row; he was up stairs and heard a row, and then went there to it; complainant had tucked up her sleeves, and she said, I am Dick Shon Shams, I'll conquer anyone on the Hedffas;" saw Dorey throw water three or four times, but heard no bad language. —Cross-examined: I am courting the defendant's daughter; I don't say I saw the beginning. After a brief consultation, the bench decided on fining the defendant 10s. and costs, or fourteen days' imprison- ment.—Hannah Dorey then appeared as the defen- dant in a cross summons to the previous case. The evidence was merely a repetition of the former affair, and the magistrates thereupon dismissed the sum- mons. MONDAY and TUESDAY, before S. GARDNER, Esq., Mayor, and J. H. ROWLANDS, Esq., Ex-Mayor. USING BAD LANGUAGE.—Margaret Tyler was charged by Mary Turner with using violent and disgusting y 11 language to her, and otherwise annoying her in the public streets. The language used, and recapitulated by the complainant, was filthy in the extreme. She called two witnesses to prove the case, and the defen- dant was consequently fined os. and costs, with an intimation from the Bench that if brought up again before them the punishment would be much more severe. THE DRUNKARDS' LIST. Thomas Samplin was charged by, Supt. Phillips with being drunk and riotous and fighting with a man named John Davies. Defendant pleaded guilty and was fined 2s. 6d.-Johii Davies, the fighting partner in the last case, was also fined 2s. 6d., the costs to be paid between them.- Hannah Thomas was then charged with being drunk and creating a disturbance in Church-place. Mr. L. Samuels corroborated Sergt. Miller's evidence respect- ing the annoyance, and the Bench adjourned the case for a month, in consequence of the husband's being a very respectable man, and his expressing his intention to remove from the neighbourhood he was then residing in. PALTRY THEFTs.David Davies was charged by Robert Cambourne with robbing his garden of a quantity of onions.—Prosecutor said lie was a fitter, and employed by the Great Western Railway Co. he missed some onions from his garden, and he suspected the prisoner.—W. Jones, a night foreman in the ser- vice of the same company, deposed that, while assisting to shunt a goods train, he saw the prisoner lying on a hedge leading to the garden, and a short time after- wards he was observed looking at the peas, beans, &c., in the adjoining garden; he then went and pulled about fifteen onions and put them in his pocket; he gave his correct name and address.—The prisoner said he went to look after a rat, and had only three onions, which he found on the path.—The prosecutor said it was not the value of the things stolen, but the frequency of the petty thefts, that made it nccessary to make an example of some one.—The Bench sentenced the prisoner to fourteen days' hard labour in the house of correction.

MR. HOWEL GWYN'S RENT AUDIT.

THE LATE FATAL ACCIDENT TO…

BOARD OF GUARDIANS.

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