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L In the House of Lords, on Friday, the Railway Companies ^ill passed through committee, with some amendments; as did also the Railway Companies (Scotland) Bill. The Vaccination Bill was read a third time and passed. The House adjourned at eight o clock. In the House of Commons, on the motion for going into committee of supply, Mr. Blake called attention to the dietary in the county prisons in Ireland. The state of Ireland and the legislation for that country proposed this Session by her Majesty's Government," was brought under review by Sir C. O'Loghlen, who, m a speech of some length, attributed the discontent which exists in Ireland te the bad state of the law in reference to the rela- tions between landlord and tenant; to the existence of what the Chancellor of the Exchequer in a speech made in 1844 termed an "alien" Church establishment. Sir P. O'Brien, Mr. Maguire, and Mr. Whalley having addressed the House, The Chancellor of the Exchequer agreed with Sir C. O'Loghlen that Parliament was about to separate, and that the state of Ireland was not satisfactory, but the hon. baronet had not said that the peculiar condition of Ireland was attributable either to the present Government or to their predecessors. The Government bad introduced a measure to amend the law of landlord and tenant, but it was received with hostile criticism, End they were told that compensation was all moocshine. Then, referring to the ) e extract from his speech of 1844, which had been quoted by Sir Colman O'Loghlen, in which he spoke of the Irish Church as an alien church, he described it as a rhetorical passage," and said the circumstances of Ireland had changed. At that time the population was eight millions; it was now five millions and a half. Ireland must be dealt with in accordance with her altered circum- stances. He trusted that by the improvement of its agri- culture, by the promotion in that country of manufactures, by a combination of various industries, the condition of Ireland would soon be greatly improved. After some observations from Sir J. Gray, Mr. Pim, Lord R. Montagu, and Mr. Monsell, Lord Naas observed that whatever might be said as to the details ef the Government bill on the land question, nobody could deny that its object was good. The bill was withdrawn because the Reform Bill had occupied so much of the attention of the House, but in a future session this and other kindred measures would receive more of the attention of the House. With regard to education, he believed the general desire of the Irish people was that it should not be separated from religious teaching. Mr. H. Seymour called attention to the case of the Abyssinian captives, and urged that the honour of the country demanded that we should resort to force if neces- sary to procure their release, but expressed an opinion that a menacing letter would have the desired effect. Mr. Layard said this question was surrounded with diffi- culties, and from the beginning he was anxious that a threat of an expedition should be avoided, but he had now reluc- tantly come to the conclusion that there was but one course, and that course was an expedition. Lord Stanley agreed that it would be discreditable to the Government to allow a person who had been entrusted with a mission from the Queen to be left in the hands of a savage. The Government had tried conciliation and that had failed, and there remained only the recourse to force. The Secretary for India had telegiaphed to the Go- vernment in India to send four officers to meet Colonel Mereweather at Aden to consult about these matters, and he submitted that this was a matter which the House must leave to the Government; and they must remember that this was a matter that they might begin or not as they pleased, but having btglln it they must not leave off. The Canongate Annuity Tax (Edinburgh) Bill, the Justices of the Peace Disqualification Removal Bill, the Weights and Measures (Dublin) Bill, and the Dublin Metropolitan Police Bill were read a third time and passed. Several other bills were forwarded a stage, and The House adjourned.

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