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THE ESTABLISHED CHURCH.

gt Jùnhan a3dft.

---------------tneraI nftIligtlU't.

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tneraI nftIligtlU't. MR. BOUCICAULT, who has been managing Booth's Theatre, New York, is suffering from a serious attack of paralysis. THE death is announced of John Baldwin Buckstone, at the age of 77, the last most versatile and brilliant of the old school of comedians. GAME LICENCES.—Licences to kill game are now issued at the reduced charge of £2 for the remainder of the season. All game certificates will expire on the 5th of April; 10s. gun licences do not qualify the holders to kill game or rabbits. DR. CUMMING.—The health of this celebrated Pro- testant lecturer and preacher has somewhat improved of late, though he has been compelled to relinquish his ministerial work. A fund sufficient to secure the doctor an annuity of jE300 has been realized. A HARE HUNT AT SEA.—On Monday a hare was seen by some coastguards on the beach near Shorncliffe. They immediately gave chase, and others soon joined in. Poor puss, being sorely pressed by some men attacking her also in front, took to sea, and boats were launched in pursuit. After considerable dodging, she was event- ually killed by a blow with an oar. THe ceremony of presenting the Lord Mayor Elect to the Lord Chancellor, for the purpose of receiving the Royal approval of the choice of the citizens, took place on Monday. The Lord Mayor Elect (Sir Francis Truscott) was introduced by the Recorder, who gave a short outline of his career, at the conclusion of which the Lord Chancellor signified her Majesty's approval of the election, and congratulated Sir Francis upon the dignity to which he had been raised. SERIOUS CHARGE OF FRAUD.—At the Liverpool police court, on Tuesday, before Mr. Raffles, Charles B. Tomlinson, a well-known cotton broker, was committed to the assizes on a charge of obtaining £10,000 from the firm of Gruning and Co., by fraudulent means. He was subsequently charged with forging two bills of ex change for the purpose of defrauding Messrs. Leyland and Bullins, bankers. On these charges he was also committed to the assizes, the prisoner reserving his de- fence. THE DUKE OF CONNAUGHT AND THE SCHOOL FOR DAUGHTERS OF ARMY OFFICERS. — The Duke and Duchess of Connaught visited Brighton, on Tuesday, for the purpose of opening a bazaar in the dome of the Royal Pavilion, in aid of the Royal Schools for the Daughters of Army Officers at Bath and Roehampton. A number of purses were received by the Duchess as contributions to the funds of the schools, and the Duke, at the close of the opening ceremony, spoke warmly of the claims the schools had on their sympathy. Brighton was en fete during the day in honour of the visit. STRANGE CONJUGAL JEALOUSY.—At Ashford, last week, Eliza Jane Armstrong, aged 19, wife of a small shopkeeper, was charged with threatening to take the life of her husband. The prisoner and her husband, it ap- peared, had had several quarrels on account of Mrs. Armstrong being jealous of a neighbour, but she ad- mitted that this woman had slept in the same bed as herself and her husband entirely with her concurrence and that subsequently to the conduct of which she found fault she went out for a drive with her husband on "as comfortable terms as ever she was in his life." The case was dismissed. THE HOME SECRETARY AND EDUCATION.—A new grammar school was opened on Monday, at Wigan, by Mr. Cross, who spoke of the deficiency which had been found to exist in the means of secondary education, and of the efforts made by the Endowed Schools Com- missioners to supply it. Their work was still proceed- ing, and he had the best hopes of the result. The Com- missioners had also provided secondary education for upwards of two thousand girls, who ought to be as highly educated as boys. He would be glad to see housekeeping and cookery taught more to the girls in the elementary schools. MR. GLADSTONE AND WELLINGTON COLLEGE.—Mr. Gladstone addressed the boys at Wellington College on Monday. He said no institution was more charactex-istic of our country than its public schools. Its peculiar feature was that the arrival of a boy at the public school was an anticipation of his after-life. If this College had not such traditions as the older public schools, it had in its name an unvarying example of single-minded devotion to public duty. The spirit of Wellington's life was that which should animate the scholars at a public school; and Mr. Gladstone concluded with an exhortation to his young hearers to realise the true ends of education. NEW MEDICAL SCHOOLS AT ST. BARTHOLOMEW'S.—The Prince and Princess of Wales, on Friday, opened the New Medical Schools at St. Bartholomew's Hospital, and the Prince expressed the deep interest which they took in everything connected with that ancient and excellent institution. Their Royal Highnesses were afterwards entertained at luncheon. The speakers were Sir Sydney Waterlow, treasurer of the hospital; Sir James Paget, Sir George Burrows, and Mr. Holden, senior surgeon. The schools, which have cost £30,000, comprise a library, museum, and class-rooms, which will accommodate, when completed, 400 students. ACTION FOR SLANDER AGAINST THE LORD MAYOR OF LONDON.—The London Stereoscopic Company, of which Mr. Alderman Nottage and Mr. Kennard are the pro- prietors, have taken the preliminary steps in an action in the Supreme Court for slander against Sir Charles Wetham, the Lord Mayor, for expressions used in his magisterial capacity on the recent hearing at the Mansion-house of a summons against a shopkeeper in the City on a charge of selling and exhibiting indecent photographs. The Lord Mayor, through his solicitors, has accepted service of the process with a view, accord- ing to his solicitors' explanation, of having "an opportunity of enlightening the public on the true facts of the case and justifying the course he has taken. THE LAWSON-LABOUCHERE CASE.—Thia case was again before Sir Robert Carden on Friday, but it was for the time brought to a sudden termination. Sir Robert had determined that he would not permit any further cross-examination of Mr. Levy Lawson, or the production of any further evidence in justification of the alleged libel, and he was supported in his view by the Attorney General, who declared, against the contention of Mr. Wildey Wright, that the case of "The Queen against Townsend" had never been over- ruled. Ultimately, the case was adjourned for a week, to give time for an application for a mandamus to the Court of Queen's Bench, to decide whether a magistrate is bound to receive evidence in justification of a libel. On Tuesday a rule was moved for in the Court of Queen's Bench, and granted. THE EARL OF CARNARVON AND PUBLIC BUILDINGS.— The Earl of Carnarvon laid the foundation stone of a New Town Hall, Free Library, Reading Rooms, Museum, and Schools for Science and Art at Reading on Monday. The buildings are estimated to cost £46,000, and of this sum £10,000 is contributed by the Corporation of the town. In the afternoon, at a luncheon, the noble Earl, responding to the toast of his health, said he knew nothing more remarkable than the extraordinary growth of public buildings in the great English towns during the last quarter of a century. He believed this meant both a much truer sense of beauty among the people than had existed for genera- tions, and also a nobler idea of public life. These buildings he regarded as a type of English life they were representative of a noble use of wealth, and they were taught the value of self-government. MR. LOWE AT GRANTHAM.—Mr. Lowe attended a Liberal meeting at Grantham on Tuesday night, and made a long speech on the political situation, urging upon the electors that they had to choose between two parties and two political systems, which he described to them. At the outset of his speech he met with some interruption, and only obtained a. hearing on the Chair- man intimating that the right hon. gentleman would decline to speak further if quiet was not restored. Mr. Lowe then argued that, Conservatives having when they came into office no principles, it occurred to the Premier that it was not necessary to do anything but merely keep himself and his friends in office. For this purpose he, for the past six years, had been stirring up a spurious feeling of dignity and patriotism in the minds of the vulgar, and left untouched every single matter of abuse at home, for the simple reason that the correction of abuse made people discontented, and was followed by a partial loss of support. The Government, he said, had made a boast of relieving local taxation, but he objected to the public at large being unjustly saddled to relieve some locality which probably ought in justice to bear its own burden.

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FOOTBALL ASSOCIATION OF WALES.…

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HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.

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IRON AND COA L.

AGRICULTURE.

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THE RURAL AUTHORITY AND THE…

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