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THE BRIGHT AND HARTINGTON"…

———————————————< CONSERVATISM…

THE TOWN CLERKSHIP.

WREXHAM A REGIMENTAL HEAD…

111j --------.._------------------_-_n__¿fDral…

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11 j -n_ ¿fDral J _— ——————————— t THE OXFoRn LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.—The prizes ( and certificates won by the saccessful candidates at f these examinations will be distributed on Friday next by the Hon. G. T. Kmyon. The Mayor 1 (Isaac Shone, Esq ) will take the chair. The time 1 and phce of meeting are given in an advertisement I in another column. E t NATIONAL SCIENCE SOCIETY.—The winter session of this society will be commenced on Tuesday next, ] when the annual meeting will be held in the small ( room of the Savings' Bank, at seven o'clock. The j first general evening meeting will also be held the < same evening, in the large room of the Savings' r Bank, at a quarter to eight o'clock, when Mr. T. t B. Acton will read an elementary paper ou Faugi." j The paper is to be illustrated with diagrams. I UNITED METHODIST FREE CHURCH RHOSDDU.— ] On Sunday and Monday last the first anniversary I of this chapel was celebrated. On Sunday three t sermons were preached to good congregations by c the Rev. Joseph Bentley (circuit minister), and on t Monday afternoon the Rev. E. J. Travis, of Liver- pool, preached a good sermon to an appreciative 1 audience, taking as his subject the Epistle of .Tomes, t 1st chapter verses 22 to 25 inclusive. On Monday v evening the same gentleman delivered a lecture t subject ''John Wesley," which indicated a thorough 1 knowledge of the subject and ample ability to deal k with it. The lecture was well attended and the proceeds of the anniversary have been satisfactory, t Dr. TALHAGB ON THE PIETY OF WALES.—In his { first sermon at the Brooklyn Tabernacle after his t return from Great Britain, Dr. Talmage, alluding t to the difference the Bible makes in countries, ] said:—"The two nations of Europe that are the a most moral to-day and that have the least crime are [ Scotland and Wales. They have by statistics, as you might find, fewer thefts, fewer arsons, fewer ] murders. What is the reason of it? A bad book t can hardly live in Wales. The Bible crowds i out. j I was told by one of the first literary men in Wales, ] There is not a bad book in the Welsh language.' ( He said, 1 Bad books come from Londea, but they t cannot live here.' It is the Bible that is dominant, in Wales." ANOTHER SAVAGE DOG.—It would appear that ( the dogs of Wrexham have great proclivities for t attacking those most useful and generally harmless men, the poBtmen. A short time ago an attack of a dog upon Mr. Cummings was chronicled, and now j it is our duty to add another to the list of savage 1 dog attacks. On Thursday morning, as Mr. F. Fuller, a letter carrier, was delivering the letters at Stanley Villa, Hightown, he was attacked bv a I&ige black retriever dog, who seized his eoat and tore it to ribbons. Fortunately, the dog was content with the coat alone, for had it changed its fury from | cloth to flish, the result would have been very serious. It is high time that something should be c done to protect the postmen from these very au- deserved assaults. j TKE FREE LIBKART.—The honorary secretary of J the above (Mr Ashton Bradley) has issued a circular i with reference to the aims of this long Jooked-for i institution. A clause in it states that "The COlli E mittee feels that in order to carry into effect the f Free Libraries Acts with energy and efficiency iu ] such a town as Wrexham they will mainly have to ] rely upon annual subscriptions and donations frf in i the public, for the rate allowed by the sialure ] cannot exceed in the pound, which will not ] realise much more than, if us much per 1 annum." 11 is intended not only to have a free ( library, COIJ! aining- reference and circulating libraries, but also a news room and museum. A ay ■ 3 articles, books, or manuscripts suitable for the < museum, would be gladly received by the secretary. I In conclusion the committee respectfully that j each will kindly assist them with a donation to < enable them to meet the expenses of adaofing the < Town Hall for library purposes, and they will ] esteem it a special favour if all wxii further oblige ] them by becoming an annual subscriber. THE RECHABITES.—The anniversary of Cambria's Glory Tent will be held on Monday next, in the Temperance Hall. A tea will be provided at five o'clock, to be followed by a free public meeting and entertainment. ACCIDENT.—A sad accident occurred on Monday night. Emmanuel Jones, a sweep residing in Pentrefelin fell through a window in the back of his house and alighted in the yard on his head. He was seriously hurt and a severe fracture of the skull is feared. He was promptly taken to the Workhouse by P. C. Williams, where* his wounds were attended to. He still remains in a precarious condition. THE WBEXHAM CHORAL SOCIETY.—This society, of whose existence but few comparatively know, consists of about 70 voices, and they have in re- hearsal Mendelssohn's beautiful cantata As the hart pants." This is in fact a small oratorio, and contains beautiful and melodious music for which the name of the composer is, or should be, a suffi- cient guarantee. It is proposed by Mr. Roberts, the conductor, and others concerned, to give as a. concert, a performance of this piece. The instru- mental portion will be borne by Mr. C. A. Stephen- son's string band. It is, we believe, intended to engage Miss Mary Davies as the soprano, and it will be a rich treat for all the music lovers in this music loving town of ours. There are several vacancies still in the society, and it is hoped that all who have musical voices will join. If the projected concert succeeds it is rumoured that Blodwen will be presented to the public at some future occasion. THE BIBLE SOCIETY.—The annual meeting of the local branch of the Bible Society was held in the Public Hall en Tuesday evening last. The attend- once was moderate. The Vicar presided at the former part of the meeting, and on his leaving, the chair was occupied by the Mayor. There were also on the platform—Rev. Jonathan Howell, B.A., Rev. Barrow Williams, B.A., Rev Rhys Jenkins, Rev. D. Roberts, Rev. A. Johnson, Rev Dicken Lewis, Dr. Eyton-Jones, and Mr. John James (treasurer). After prayer, the Vicar gave an opening address, in the course of which he spoke of the importance of the society and the honour which it conferred upon all who held office in connection with it. Mr John James, hon. treasurer of the branch, then read the statement, which shewed that there had been received from collections £83 Is 6d, making with other items of income a total of .£8698 6d, which was slightly below the sum received last year. Addresses were given by the Rev. Rhys Jenkins and ilie Rev. Dickin Lewis (deputation from the parent society). YOUNG MEN'S DEBATING CLASS.—A meeting of the debating class in connection with the Voung Men's Christian Association was held in the rooms on Tuesday last. Mr. S. Sothern, junr., read all essay on toe character of Nero. He confined his remarks chiefly to the four great crimes alleged against this historical monster, viz., the murders of Britannicus, of his mother, and his wife, and the burning of Rome. Having given the versions of the events by the ancient historians Suetonius, Tacitus, and Dioncassius, he criticised their ap- parent absurdity and it consistency. Mr. Sothern did not attempt to justify Nero, but to show the probability of exaggeration in connection with these dreadful stories. The reason for Nero's unpopularity he attributed, not to his cruelty but to his disrespect to the Imperial purple by taking j part in the arena and on the stage. A discussion followed in which Mr. Ault, the Rev. J. Bentley, the Secretary, Mr. C. Dodd, and others took I Opinion was a,bout equally divided, and Nero would probably have been proud of the valiant efforts made to clear his character of some of the ] charges now laid to him by every school boy. i: THE NEW SEWAGE INVENTION.—The Direct Action Steam Ejector, invented by Mr. Kidd, will, we are given to understand, play an important part. in the economical raising of town sewage when such is desirable. It is applicable to a;iy a of sewerage, and can be placed where required at a height not exceeding thirty feet above, or at any] suitable depth below the level of the sewage to be ejected. The saving in first cost will be very con- siderabie, as neither steam engine, enginehouse and ] foundations, or air compressing machinery will be required. In raising the sewage of a large town this woHld amount to an outlay of several thousands of pounds, besides which there would be saved the] annual expense and wear and tear attached to such machinery. The steam power required for Mr. j ■ Kidd's ejector would be simply that which would 1 have to be supplied for any other schemc. We i j understand that by an ordinary pressure of steam water can be raised by this apparatus to an j] altitude of 1,000 feet if necessary in one lift. Wo I should think it would be very difficult to construct 1 a more simple apparatus than the model. LECTURE ON ROWLAND HILL.—On Monday even- ] ing last, a lecture was delivered in the Public Hall, ] by the Rev. Thomas Evans, of Merthyr, on "Row- 1 land Hill, the popular minister of Surrey, chapel." The Mayor took the chair, and expressed 1 the pleasure he had in presiding at the meeting, t, and also the pleasure he anticipated in hearing Mr. 1 Evans The audience was extremely small but, as Mr Evans remarked at the commencement of the lecture, very select. He lamented that there was no autobiography of Rowland Hill. There should j be. ne thought, autobiographies of all the great j men. Who could write a biography of Spurgeon ? Dr. Guthrie had written a portion of his, and his sous had written a biography, but it was impossible ( to compare t he two. There was, however, a. good biograhy of Rowland Hill, written by Mr. Charles- worth, and it was worth reading. Hill was a witty man, but he was more than that, he had in him t the true life of a Christian. It is not fair to judge on the merits of this great man, on his witticisms r alone. The life of the preacher was then reviewed, and numerous anecdotes of the great wit were related and much enjoyed, nor were the sparkling J mots of the lecturer unnoticed. At the close of the 1 meeting Mr. J. M. Jones proposed, and Mr. Tilston C seconded votes of thanks to the lecturer and the i chairman, both of whom briefly responded. LECTURE BY THE REV. HERBER EVANS.—On Friday night week, a lecture was delivered in the Congregational Chapel, Chester-street, by the Rev. Herber Evans, of Carnarvon. The subject was. Livingstone, and lessons to be learnt from his life." This is a lecture Mr. Evans has delivered several times in Wrexham, but is, we believe, the first time it has been given in English, and as Mr. Evans re- marked, he would have some difficulty in expressing 1 himself in English and in keeping in the Welsh"! It was not so much a life of Livingstone as a sermon upon the great hero, interspersed by pithy anec- < dotes and aphorisms, sarcastic allusions to com- mon faults, and rules for future guidance. Pictures a were drawn of Livingstone from boyhood to man- hood, and until the closing scene of his life was enacted. Mr. Evans, remarking upon the facility c with which Scottish boys might enter the Scotch 2 universities and obtain a sound education, said the t Welsh Uuivereity at Aberystwith was much abused ( by the Church Congress at Swansea. The Welsh people should get their members of Parliament to a take the matter up, and if they would not, they must find other members who would. In his re ference to Mr. H. M. Stanley, he said he was proud to know that Stanley was a Welshman. He was certain that Stanley was none other than John Rowlands, of Denbigh. He had seen his mother, ■. and was convinced of the truth of the above state- ment. Mr. Evans was repeatedly applauded during ) he lecture. A vote of thanks was awarded to the lecturer, on the proposal of Mr. J. Francis, superin- ] tendent, of the Sunday school, and seconded by Mr. E. LI. Lloyd, secretary of the school. The Rev. i H. J. Haffer presided, in the absence of Sir R. A. Cunhffe, who was unavoidably detained from at- tending the meeting. ( MADAME PATEY.—We beg to draw the attention 1 of our readers to the announcement, in another column, of Mr. Harriss's grand concert on Friday, the 28ih inst. Betides the welcome appearance of Madame Patey, that glorious contralto, we are promised a soprano, in Miss Carina Clelland, of the < Highest order. The opinions of the press of this lady's singing is most flattering. She possesses a voice of immense compass and brilliancy, and two out of several pieces she is to sing include the diffi- cult variations of "Le Carnival de Venici," ar- ranged for voice and piano by the veteran Sir Julius Benedict, and the Shadow song," from Dinorah. Her other songs are The sailor's grave," by Tuiliuah, and the ever welcome "I dreamt I dwelt in marble halls," which she sings by special permission of Mr. Carl Rosa, the copyright holder of the opera of the "Bohemian Girl." Madame Patey sings four songs, one, The golden gate," a new and magnificent setting of Barnett's, in fact, it is more like a scene than a song. The old, old, story," and The minstrel boy," are being sung by special request. Madame Patey will also sing Roeckely's Irish song, "Terry O'Shea." Mr. R°.ufern Hollins sings the celebrated cantata by Beethoven, "Adelaide," made famous bv Sims Reeves, also" Love's request," Goodbye" sweet- j heart," and "The anchor's weighed." Miss Bessie Wacgh, who y/e are sure, receive a warm re- eepiioLi, plays three piano solos, and in two duets with Mr. Harris, and Miss Jennie Davies. Mr. Harriss's daughter also makes her first bow at this concert. Mr. Needham, the silver flautist, is down for two solos. With such talent and such a pro- gramme, any hicg less than a crowded audience will not refl et to our credit. We notice that Coilard and Collard's grand will be used as on the last concert. We ar* glad to End the plan of the i reserved sfats already filling, and we advise early: application to secure the best places. 1 CONCERT :8Y THE BLIND.—It will be remembered that some months ago a concert was held in this t wn by anum ber of blind persons connected with,1 and in aid of, the Wilberforce Institution for the Blind at York. They had then, unfortunately, a very meagre attendance, but, nothing daunted, they have very wisely resolved to give another en- tertainment. On Friday next a concert, very similar to the previous one, will be held in the Public Hall, under the presidency of the Vicar. No doubt the charitable will feel a call upon them in aiding those who have lost the most precious of all gifts, sight. A PROFESSIONAL THIEF.—At Warrington, last ( week, Susannah Morgan, the young woman who was convicted at Wrexham some time since on a charge of obtaining a watch from Mr. Fraser, of High-street, by false pretences, was charged with having on the 3rd of July, 1878, obtained a watch and silver guard by false pretences. On the 13th of June a Mr. Buckley took a silver watch and chain to the shop of Mr. W. Woods, jeweller, Sankey-street, to be cleaned. On the 3rd of July the prisoner called at the shop and asked for the watch which Mr. Buckley had left. It was given to her, and she absconded. It was subsequently ascertained that she was at the Inutsford Gaol, having been convicted at Wrexham on the above charge. When taken into custody by the Warring- ton police the woman said that her husband had told her to do it. She had taken other watches in a similar manner, seven of which her husband had pawned. He had deserted her because she could not steal quickly enough for him, and he was now co- habiting with another woman, and was an associate of thieves. She was committed for trial to the forthcoming Kirkdale Sessions. SPECIAL SERVICE IN THE PARISH CHURCH.—On Sunday afternoon a service was held for men only. The Rev. J. Cullin preached to a crowded congrega- tion, from the 9th chapter of Luke from the 57th verse to the end. It was a reference to the three men who were called by Christ to follow him. They made a variety of excuses. He thought it was a necessity for men to acknowledge Christ as their supreme ruler, and no man went more astray than when he said" I will be my own master in all things," because he would be a wonderfui man, indeed, who could be his own master at all times. and over his own inclinations, and the full force of the world. He would be a. strong man indeed, if he could resist all tempta- tions. The preacher went on to say that they were not the creatures of circumstances but of an over-ruling Providence, and they might all tell him the creatures of His love, and of His mercy, and of His Cluist, and of His most wonder- ful and undescribable love. After referring to the promises of eternal life, he concluded his most persuasive address by stating that the excuses made by the men in the text were often repeated in these days. WREXHAM HARE AND HOUNDS' CLUB.—The I annual general meeting of this ciub was held at the Wynnstay Arms, Hotel, on Thursday, October 23t:d., when the following members were present:— The president (Dr. R. W. J. Evans), in the chair, Messrs. J. A. Chad wick, B. Lewis, J. A. Cooper, F. Newstead, H. A. Hamshaw, R. C. Vaugnan, T. H. Bancroft, F. Lynch, A. Thomas, and J. Stewart Crawford, hon. sec. The accounts of the sports, held in May last, were submitted to the meeting, showed a deficiency of .£12 12s., and it was unani- mously decided to apply to the members of the club to make up the amount. The accounts of the Hare and Hounds' Ciub were next passed, which showed a balance in hand of .£3 2s. 71-,1, which amount was voted towards reducing the deficiency of the sports' account. Mr. J. Oswell Bury was elected president or the club for the ensuing season, Mr. Crawford being re-elected hon. seere- tary, and Mr. A. Thomas, treasurer. Mr. B Lewis was appointed huntsman, with Messrs. Lynch and Cocper as deputies, and the following members were elected to serve on the committee in addition to the president, hon. secretary, treasurer, and first huntsman as ev-offivio members:—Messrs. Cha.dwick, Hamshaw, Cooper, Evans, and Newstead. A vote of thanks was unanimously accorded the retiring president for the interest he had always taken in the welfare of the club. PRESENTATION TO MR. HENRY BOOTHEY.—A very pleasing occurrence took place on Wednesday last, in the large room or the Young Men's Christian Association, Hope-street. It was the presentation to Mr. Henry Boothey a silver inkstand on the occasion of his leaving Wrexham for Cardiff. Mr. T. Brown presided, and after a few preliminary remarks, Mr. Western, the secretary of the association, read a list of the subscriptions. The movement had, he said, been originated by the committee with the intention of keeping it within j that limit, but subscriptions offered outside were not refused. Mr. Rocke was then called upon to make the presentation, and in doing so remarked upon the work done by Mr. Boothey. He regretted very much that there should be any necessity for their friend to leave Wrexham, but Wrexham's loss wag Cardiff's gain. He then referred at some length to the work done by Mr. Boothey in many ways, but principally in starting that association which was so great a boon to the young men in the town. He then presented Mr. Boothey with the testimonial. Mr. Boothey said ] he scarcely knew how to express his thanks for the gift. He had always felt a great pleasure in being connected with the association. He hoped that each individual member of it would do his best, and if that was done all would be well. He thanked them very much for the beautiful gift he had just received. Mr. Hughes Williams and Mr. Gill also i spoke. The testimonial, which is a very elegant one, was supplied by Mr. D. D. Pierce, Hope-street, < and bears the following inscription, Presented to Mr. Henry Boothey by the Committee of the Young I Men's Christian Association, as a token of their regard, 28th October, 1879." The inkstand is one of ^Ikington's newest designs. There are two ink receptacles, divided by a cup for pens, &c., rising i from the cover of which is a stag's head with large 1 antlers. The base is oval, and prettily bordered.

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CHURCH OF ENGLAND TEMPERANCE…

[No title]

A WORTHY OFFICER. j ;

j8.4 TCRDA V, November, 1st,…