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THE RHYL COMMISSIONERS AND…

PRESTATYN PETTY SESSIONS.

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HINTS FOR THE HOME.,

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HINTS FOR THE HOME., THE WORTH OF A SMILE.- Who can tell the valul of a smile ? It costs the giver nothing, but is beyond price to the erring and relenting, the sad and echeerlss, the lost and forsaken. It disarms malice- subdues temper-turns hatred to love-revenge to kindness—and paves the darkest paths with gems of sunlight. A smile on the brow betrays a kind heart, a pleasant friend, an affectionate brother, a dutiful son, a happy husband. It adds a charm to beauty, it decorates the face of the deformed, and makes a lovely woman resemble an angel in paradise. PARTIAL KNOWLEDGE.—Our happiness as think- ing beings must depend on our being content to accept only partial knowledge, even in those matters which chiefly concern us. If we insist upon perfect intelligibility and complete declaration on every moral subject, we shall instantly fall into misery or unbelief. Our whole happiness and power of energetio action depend upon our being able to breathe and live in the cloud, content to see it opening here and closing there, rejoicing to catch through its thinnest films glimpses of stable and substantial things. LoSING SLEEP.—Men who are the fastest asleep when they are asleep are the widest awake when they are awake. Great workers must be great resters. Every man who has clerks in his employ ought to know what their sleeping habits are. The young man 7 who sits up till two, three, or four o'clock in the morning, and must put in an appearance at the shop or office at nine or ten o'clock and work all the day, cannot repeat this process many days without a cer- tain shakiness coming into his system, which he will endeavour to steady by some delusive stimulu*. It is in this way that many a young man begins his course to ruin. He need not necessarily have been in bad company. He has lost his sleep, and losing aloop he is losing strength and grace. < THE ART OF WALKING.—If a man would appear like a gentleman he must walk, stand, and sit like one. In walking he should avoid everything that is unnatural or that smacks of self-consciousness. How often do you see men in the street whose every r movement tells us their minds are chiefly on them- selves. One throws out his chest, while another walks with an abnormal stoop, but both delight in a kind of rolling, swaggering gait, and an unnatural swing of the arms. Not only is a man's walk an index of his character and of the grade of his culture, but it is also an index of the frame of mind he is in. There is the thoughtful walk and the thoughtless .walk, the responsible walk, the idler's walk, the ingenuous <• walk, and the insidious walk, and so on. In a word, what there is in us we all carry in essentially the same way hence, the surest way to have the carriage of gentility is to have the gentility to carry. SLEEPING DRAUGHTS.—The dangerous and lament able habit of promiscuously taking sleeping draugh has unfortunately become very prevalent, ent»'' misery and ill-health to a terrible degree. persons addicted to this destructive prg erroneously think that it is better to take a sle draught than lie awake. A greater mistake /ill hardly exist. All opiates occasion more or leea mia- chief, and even the state of stupefaction they induce utterly fails to bring about that revitaliiation resulting from natural sleep. Chloral is popularly supposed to give a quiet night's rest, without any of the after effects (headache, &c.) produced by various pre- parations of morphia. Now, chloral is what is termed cumulative in its action, which implies that even the same dose persisted in for a certain length of time may cause death. Of all hypnotics chloral is by far the most deadly, and should never, under any circum- stances, be taken except under medical supervision. RELAXATION.—We all have twenty-four hours every day to invest, and if one hour withdrawn from busi- ness can be better invested, is it not a wise thing to do it? Relaxation, however, to be profitable, must be whole-hearted. It is not rest for the busi- ness man to bring his affairs and worries home with c him. It is not rest for the student to brood over theories and formulas when he walks, neither is it rest to take ones fear and anxieties to our friends table. If we have no heart to throw off these burdens, we should make the effort in spite of ourselves. We have been bound to our cares as the convict is to his ball and chain, and it is time to master circum. stances, instead of being their slaves. Mental slaves are more dependent upon the physical condition than we are inclined to think. Irritability means overstrained nerves; the blues and "black butter. flies" are other names for indi estion and a poor circulation. Recreation, it is to be remembered, is neither dissipation, nor yet absence of aotivity. Com- plete change of thought is relaxation; and Hood is quoted by a recent writer as saying that the Quaker r always enjoys life, for he makes a pleasure of his | business and a business of his pleasure. ART WORK FOR LADIES. —There is scarcely any limit to the work in the way of decoration that ladies impose upon themselves nowadays. That which they would have regarded as a laborious undertaking a few years ago they now consider as a merely pleasurable occupation. Not content with painting the walls of their rooms with subjects of their own design, with stencilling patterns on the cornices of the ceilings, with decorating the panels of doors and shutters,with executing stained-glass windows, with painting tapestry for portiferes and chair and sofa coverings, they now fill up any leisure time they have at their disposal by making some useful or ornamental article in brass. The work is quite easy, but a little patience is needed, as the metal does not yield all at onceito the blows of the hammer and tools, as may readily be understood. And it is certainly not suitable employment for any one who objects to a continuous tapping sound, for that is altogether unavoidable. Allowance being made for this drawback, repouss^- work is not otherwise unpleasant; indeed it would seem that many amateurs thoroughly enjoy it. In our opinion it is especially adapted for boys, and is an amusement that will keep their brains employed and their hands out of mischief on rainy days and long winter evenings.—CasselVt Family Magazine. THE SISTER OF MERCY. She never knew that music soft and sweet,- The patter of a baby's little feet; She never knew the world of joy and bliss v T A 77 That lingers in a husband's tender kiss She never knew the sorrow and the woe Of losing light from eyes whose radiant glow Was all her sun i, She lives in vain, you say ? If, then, to live in vain is day by day „ To go among the lowly and the poor, > !K': 3 110' A ray of sunshine to each darkened door To soothe with gentle words and gentle touoh Wretches who sinned and sinned to suffer much; To be the link that joins a weary life To God to be the comforter of strife v To be the soothing balm for every pain r Then that grand woman truly lives in vain. -Cluskeg CromweU. WAKING AT WILL. We have a very distinct recollection of many in- stances in which we have ourselves tried the experi- ment with success, and at one time, when it was necessary for a considerable period for us to wake on certain days of the week at a very early hour to take the first train to the place where our services were D then needed, we had an opportunity of studying the -—- circumstances under which this peculiar speoies of self- control is most easily exercised. During this period we found no difficulty in waking regularly within > about five minutes of the time necessary to enable u. to reach the train comfortably, although for a portion r of the time this involved getting up long before day- light; but we discovered also that, in order to wak* with precision at the right moment,and to rest quietly until it arrived, it was necessary to look at our waten just before going to sleep. If we neglected this pre- caution we were apt to sleep uneasily, waking first an hour or more before the proper time and allowing ourselves, in consequence, only short naps afterward until the minute arrived for getting up. Whatever part of our mind it might have been that took charge of waking us seemed to begin its count of the hours Hli from the time at which we composed ourselves to, • sleep, and if we did not inform ourselves of this, ov"; conscious reckoning was correspondingly uncertain, and the effort to wake vague but if we took a. clear note of the time in the evening, we could sleer, peace- fully through the whole of the allotted interval, sura of being aroused at or very near ita expiration. An. other condition of waking we found to be the occur- rence of some smair external t event, through w. v as it were, the internal effort could take effect i our senses. A very trifling circumstance-the ft of a leaf outside the window, the chirp of a birci, it any other of the unnumbered sounds of early mórn- lng-was sufficient, if it happened at the right time, to wake us by a sort of magnifying process which at that moment gave the power of startling us by a noise which would at other times be unnoticed; but with. out such sensible impression we think we should not .bavo waked. In fact, on one or two occasions we re- member to have been impressed with a dim conscious- ness of waiting for something to happen before wak- ing, and a moment later a trifling Bound would open our senses with a little shock. To the necessity of waiting for this impression, small as it might be, we were disposed to attribute the variation of a minute or two either way from the exact moment assigned for waking, which might otherwise be kept with exact punotuality.-Detroit Free Press. MENTAL CULTURE.—The test of good mental culture is a well-balanced mind that thinks not only strongly in one direction, but deeply and evenly in all; and the test of character is a well-balanced nature that not f only springs to do one or two great and congenial things, but also rejoices in the patient and conscien- > tious fulfilment of every duty and in loyal devotion to every principle.

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