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LIFEBOAT SERVICES. -

---WESLEYAN FOREIGN MISSIONARY…

VOLUNTEER SHOOTING MATCH.

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MISCELLANEOUS.

RHYL-

EDUCATIONAL EXAMINATION.

I ROMANTIC ELOPEMENT.

THE SKYE CROFTERS.

FATAL STABBING BY A YOUTH.

E VERY-DAY LIFE AT DONGOLA.

ST. ASAPH.

ST. ASAPH DEBATING SOCIETY.I…

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ST. ASAPH DEBATING SOCIETY. On Wednesday, November 12th, J. Jones, Esq., Riverdale, read to this society, his long promised paper entitled" An hour on the Continent," The President introduced Mr Jones, and made a few remarks as to thj increased facilities for travelling now-a-days, which contrasted so favourably with the quiet steady going methods of his young days. Mr Jones asked the hearers to go with him on his jot,, ney, and to endeavour to see with their own eyes the sights which he was going to describe to them. First, then, as all his bearers In ed at St Asaph, it would be necessary to rise early, in order to catch the first train, before 7 in the morn- ing. From the starting place he proceeded to Chester, Leeds, Hull, and from the last named town he embarked iti a most, comfortable steamship called The Holo" for Norway. After a pleasant voyage of two days, during which time he hoped his companions, when they went, would suffer as little inconvenience from the motion of the ship as he (lid,-fcr the' tariff was 8s per day. They arrived at a port on Sunday miming, and as the Norwegians are a Sabba h lowng people, the passengers were only allowed an hour on shore. When all had returned to the ship, a beautiful service was held, in which all joined in a most hearty manner. Then they proceeded to the port where they intonded to laud. Mr Jones went on to say that lie found the Norwegians a peace-loving and law abiding nation. They had rather a curious way of dealing with drunkards. On the first offence, the delinquent was placed in prison for the night, his breakfast on the followiug morning was provided for him. If the offence was repeated, he was detained for longer periods, and his bill was sent in, and had to be paid by his friends, ere he was set at liberty. The houses were mostly built of wood, and there ware a great many churches, some verv ancient'. Tbeir religion is Lutheran. Their mode of travelling is curious. There are small carts which hold one person, Ins portmanteau and a boy, who acts as guide. I a front of the cart is a footboard on which the driver's feet have b be fb-mly planted, for the ponies are capital ones, and keep up a good pace. Several parts which Mr Jones had passed through, forcibly reminded him of beautiful Wales, though on the while, Norway is much grander, and on a larger scale than this little country. He had seen several of the 1 irjfe water- falls, and had been deeply impressed by the grandeur of the rushing waters, which recalled to his mind Keble's beautiful words, relative to the, sublimity of the works of Almighty God. From, Norway he went on to Sweden, in which countrv he found the same national characteristics as he had already noticed. One thing he would like to mention was that the Norwegian mile was seven times as long as the English. He would sum up by saying lie had found the people intelligent, peaceful, prosperous, contented and courteous. The Ven. Archdeacon Ffoulkes, said he had been very much edified by Mr Jones' paper. He specially noticed what had been said about courtesy. He though habits of politeness ought to be more Hivated among us. On the Continent the L bsli were regarded as the rudest people. When in Italy last spring, the Ven. Arohdeacon, in company with his Italian physician had occasion to enter a shop. The doctor doffed his hat to the shop-keeper, who in his turn bowed, and asked what he required. On leaving the shop, the same interchange took place. In England such a thing never occurs, and he thought that if it did, we should be the better for it. Mr Alun Lloyd agreed with the Archdeacon on some points, but he placed sincerity before polite- ness. He thought that raising of the hat was only necessary when meeting personal friends. At the same time, were—what he might style -wholesale politeness to become the custom, he would venture to suggest that the higher orders should take the initiative. He had often noticed that when a person of inferior social position raised his hat to a superior, that superior merely raised his hand to his face, in an almost derisive manner. Such a reception of a courteous action was not likely to act as an encouragement of these habits which had been so much admired and lauded The meeting broke up with the usual votes of thanks to Mr Jones, and Rev. B. Hughes.

[No title]

IMMORALITY IN RHYL.

IFOOTBALL NOTES.

THE RHUDDLAN MARSH EMBANKMENT…

Family Notices

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