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SERIALS FOR APRIL.

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SERIALS FOR APRIL. (First Batch.) THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE. Mr Blanchard Jerrold'a singular story, the 'Christian Vagabond' is advanced two chapters, and M. Victor Hugo's romance has reached the eighth book of the secoml part. Sporting men will red with pleasure a paper this month on 'The Horse in Yorkshire before 1750;' and there is a capital sketch of the" coxcomb, and bore; the woak, vain, pushing, curious and garrulous"—and at the same time the most delightful of biographers— Boswell. Another article in the number gives a clever description of a cork model of a cathedral, under the title of 'A Wonderful Building.' In the 'Notes and Incidents' the death of Mr W. H. Dixon, "The Druid," is referred to. The loss to one branch of the world of letters will be great; and the readers of the Gentleman's Jlana- zine will miss the pleasant pen which recorded sports and pas- times for its p;i £ res. MACMZLLAN S MAGAZINE. We hope Mr A. Trollope is not writing too much for his fame ? He is certainly writing too fast for his renders Those who attempt to follow him must get confused as to who's who, especially as his heroes and heroines are not very striking in their individuality. And now he is going to add to the confusion by another story, Sir Harry Hotspur of Humbletliwaite,' for the columns of MacmiUaa. The new story will begin next month, and in the same number will appear the 'Poem of Eight hundred lines, by George Eliot,' we mentioned last month. The opening paper this month is a review, with extracts, of the volume of the letters of the late Sir George Corilev. all Lewis, recently published. The ex- tracts are well chosen, and the estimate of character formed by the author seems just. Sir George never was a great states- man, nor were his literary judgments always very sound — notably his opinion of Hallam, Macaulay, and Dickens. For all this he was a man whose place as a statesman and as an author the world cannot till every day. The Dean of Westminster con- tributes a 'Hymn on the Transfiguration' this month, and the 'Brave Lady' is concluded: so- by the wa)", is the volume. Macmillan's is one of the few magazines that can afford to com- plete a story with a volume, because it is one of the few serials that is worth the binding. SAINT PAULS. The 'Editor's Tales' this month contains the second put of the 'Spotted Dog;' and the novel from the same prolific pen, Ralph the Heir,' comprises three new chapters. There is an interesting paper on the subject of Our Rural Labourers' that farmers will be interested in. The paper, of course, is founded on the Commissioners' recent report. Of Shropshire the writer says "The diet of the labourer does not very much surpass that of his more southern comrade, but the cheapness of fuel makes a vast improvement in his general con- dition." Besides the papers we have mentioned, there are others on Soldiers' Wives, Colours of the Planets, &c., and the continuation of Mrs Oliphant's novel. BELGRAVIA. Miss Braddon is again in harness, and the first-fruits of her new novel, 'Fenton's Quest,' appears this month. Three chapters are given The Common Fever, -Mariner's Story, and Accepted. Air W. W. Tulloch writes of Easter in Rome, and Mr Sala describes an interview with Mr Ned Wright, of The Gospel Hall; the gentleman who seems to feel rather proud than otherwise of having been a thief and prizefighter. Mr Sala believes Wright to be thoroughly in earnest in trying to do good it would be bettor if lie would not make such a parade of his work and discontinue the plan of admitting the well-dressed public to see the animals' feeding at his 'Thieves' Suppers.' Another article is about Russia and Nicholas 1., and Mr Fitzgerald gives another of the Loves of Great Men. The number has several readable papers, and is well illustrated. TINSLETS MAGAZINE contains a jocular article on The Characteristics of 111 which gentlemen arc plea- santly chaffed. The writer affects to be astonished at the absorbing nature of sport, and says:—"One astonishing pecu- liarity about sportsmen is that they never seem to weary of the same thing, or of talking of it. They talk every incident of the day over and over again, and kill their birds five or six times each. One hears grey-headed men discuss their day's sport as eagerly as a girl does her first ball, and this after they have been doing the same thiD. year after year. A complete story in five chapters, one or two shorter tales, and the continu- ation of the two novels, complete the excellent shilling's worth Tinsley offers this month. CHAMBERS'S JOURNAL. From grave to gay, from lively to severe—aptly describes a part of Chambers's Journal. Here is an extract combining all the four styles :—"Mrs Banwell was a widow doubly so, indeed, for she had 'planted'two husbands --iteni, a retired butcher, and item a small money lender. Each had home fruit after his kind and Mrs Banwell lived comfortably on the produce, about four hundred a year. Wo called her, perhaps rather unkindly, the Vampire." Mr William Chambers gives his experiences of Mentone this month, in three chapters, and there are several readable stories and sketches, including The Last Escape from Siberia—The Pullman Hotel Express-The Fatal Bouquet, &c., &c. GOOD WORDS FOR THE YOUNG. If there should be, amongst our readers, a single parent who can afford to spend an additional sixpence a month on his children, and has never invested in this charming serial, the best advice we can give him is—Buy it at once The only danger will be that paterfamilias will want to enjoy it himself and so keep the junior branches waiting. In addition to the usual features, there are some especially nice bits of story and woodcut this month and the number altogether is quite worthy of the editor, Mr Macdonald, which is saying much. THE MILLION. This is a new serial for the benefit of "The Million," and providing for the scanty and hard-earned leisure of the many, such recreation as may be at once instructive and interesting." This is all very well, and no doubt 'the million' will support a serial whose boast is that it has "no aristocratic sympathies, no fashionable aspirations," but how about the coloured frontispiece to the part, giving, as it does, highly col- oured patterns of evening dresses that would be worth say, ten pounds each ? Are these for the million V or for such of 'the million' who are dressmakers CA>SSELL'S MAGAZINE. Of course first in importance comes the great author's clever story—Man and Wife, by Wilkie Collins-but when this is read there is much left that is readable. An American writes of the Beecher family there are some per- sonal recollections of Thackeray—always welcome; there is a tale in two chapters, Mrs Allonby and some words from Gari- baldi to his English friends. Then there are several very attractive pictures—and all for sixpence LONDON SOCIETY. The April number is as rich in pictures as ever, but the pictures are by no means the best feature of the book. There has been a wonderful improvement of late years in the stories and sketches, and now we can hardly say where a more attractive all round' serial than London Society, is to be met with. Tom Slender, this month, gives a story Of Allan Graham,' and there is a Story of aCashmere Shawl.' The Picca- dilly Papers, are, as usual, good, and there is a Romance of South Kensington, tc., &c. THE ARGOSY contains a very seasonable article on the Oxford and Cambridge Boat Race, in which it gives a good deal of information that is new, and corrects some erroneous im- pressions relative to the preparations for the struggle. The writer is of opinion that the virtues' exhibited in boat racing are not "produced at the expense of the young men's blood." Those who are not heartily sick of the Byron controversy will find Airs Stowe's Vindication' criticised, and denounced, in twenty pages of this month's Argosy, and the admirers of Johnny Ludlow—which of course include all his readers—will find him at his post. Mrs Wood's novel Betsy Rane' is con- tinued and there are two or three subjects treated in prose and poetry we have not mentioned. THE CORNHILL MAGAZINE. The leading features this month are The Uses of Fools,' a pregnant subject; At Rome,' by H. C. Merivale and the two continuous stories, 'Put Your- self in His Place' and Against Time.' Besides these there are a German Legend and an English Story, completed. Mr Reade, in the leading story, draws nice distinctions between the sexes, thus — •' Nature implants in woman a genuine love of off- spring that governs them unconsciously. It governs the unconscious child; it governs the half-conscious mother who comes home from the toy-shop with a waxen child for her girl and a drum for her boy. Men desire offspring—when they desire it at all—from vanity alone. Women desire it from pure love of it," ( To be continued.)

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