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MONDAY.

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MONDAY. The House of Lords transacted little legislative business-; but a motion for a roturn proposed by Lord Penzance led to a rather interesting conversation upon the subject of the exercise of the royal prerogative of mercy under the advice of the Home Secretary and a fragment of the state of Ireland question was raised by the, Marquis of Clanritarde in asking for copies of certain reports presented to the Irish Government. Both returns were refused by the Government, and no division took place upon either subject. s I In the House of Commons notice was given of several motions which are to be made after Easter; and among these, not the least interesting was Mr C. Reed's intimation of his intention to propose a resolution upon.the subject of workmen's trains.—In answer to questions, Mr Gladstone declined to offer any com- Sensation to the widorw of the late Mr G. W. Gordon, of amaica, for the execution of her husband and promised that before the adjournment of the House the Solicitor-General would fix an early day for the introduction of the University Tests Bill.—Mr Monsell informed the House that the Govern- ment have under consideration the propriety of sending a small bodv of British troops to the Red River Settlement.—The Lord Advocate expressed the hope that he shall be able to bring in the Game Bill next Monday.-As soon as the House went into Committee upon the Irish Land Bill, Mr Disraeli rose to move an amendment in clause 3, the effect of which was to exclude from the damages to be paid to an outgoing tenant any compen- sation for loss sustained by quitting his holding, and to confine it to unexhausted improvements, and the disturbance of the course of husbandry. The right hon. gentleman did not confine himself to the explanation of this amendment or the exposition of the reasons which had induced him to propose it; but entered into a prolonged argument to show that the Government had by the alterations which they had themselves proposed so altered this Bill as entirely to change its character, and to de- ceive and mislead those who/like himself, had upon the second rea.dinj:t promised it a cordial support; and though he would not say that this had been donerto "gain the voices of some ground- lings," he did assert that its object was to please some few Irish members at the expense of .the support of two-thirds CJf the House. The clause as it stood would acknowledge that the occupier had a permanent interest in the soil which ti- vated-a principle which would operate injuriously upon ten- ants themselves, and if adopted for Irehnd must be extended to' Engffla and Scotland.—The Chancellor of the Exchequer was at pains to show that Mr Disraeli had never given his con- fidence to the Government, and that if he had it had not been betrayed by the amendments Which ministers sought to intro- duce. The granting of compensation for disturbance of occupancy he defended 'by reference to the state of Ireland, and the nècessi.ty of-giving some increased security • to. tenancy, and by that means to the property of the owner also, and of imposmg so penalty: upon harsh and capricious evictions. To the contentIOu of Jdr Disraeli that the proposal of he Government violated the principles of political economy, he replied that with this question, political economy, as the science of the accumulation and distribution of this wealth, had nothing to do, and observed with-PQCuliar emphasis, The prin- ciples of political economy! We violate them every day." After, a discussion, in which MrHawly, Mr Chichester Fortescue, ,and others took part, Mr Gladstone spoke. The preliminary ,observations of the Prime Minister were rendered noteworthy by the announcement that as the Government regard this as an exceptional, and hope that it may prove even a temporary measure, they are prepared to mark that sense of its character ■by providing that the clauses which are in restraint of freedom -of. contract shall not be passed in general terms, but shall remain iin force for twenty years, or "thereafter until Parliament shall otherwise determin-v." To the amendment under discussion. Mr 'Gladstone objected that if adopted it would break down one of the-three great pilla.Es of the Bill—the principle that the Irish tenant when causelessly evicted should be entitled to compensa- tion for,-his loss-,nthout which the measure would be a miser- able ruin. So far from foreseeing or intending the introduction of this measure into England and Scotland, the Government had drawn the Bill so as to render such a step az difficult as possible; &1i.d nothing could more directly tend to its facilitation than the proposal of the member t or Bucks. Air Disraeli's amendment was rejected by a majority of 76-.296 to 220. After the cheers with which the announcement of the numbers was received had subsided, the chairman was ordered to report progress.

TL-ESDAV.

HOUSE OF COMMONS.—TUESDAY.

ABERYSTWYTH.

Aberystwyth Water Supply.

CORWEN.

I CARNO.

CARDIGANSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS.

RESIGNATION OF THE CHAIRMAN.

THE JOINT COUNTIES' LUNATIC…

THE ELECTION OF A GOVERNOR…

TRAGARON LOCK-UP.

APPOINTMENTS.

THE COUNTY PRISON,

MERIT REWARDED.

MISCELLANEOUS.

RATES.

FRIDAY.

WEDNESDAY.

THURSDAY.

MR ARNOLD TAYLOR'S REPORT.