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The following extract from Mr Baxter's speech on the administration of the navy is fearfully suggestive of the I wholesale swindling to which the nation has been ex- | < posed- < ] At Deptford he found that there was a stock of essence of beef to last for seven and a half years; also four years stock of pickles in han(i--(Itughter); then they had six and a half years supply of white wines and how many years' supply of candles for the transports did the committee suppose they had? Why, ten years' supply. (Laughter.) The right hon. gentleman op- posite, who had been so many years at the Admiralty, and knew so much about the navy, would probably be able to enlighten them about some of those things. There was an item called foot-pieces for stockings"—some covering, he supposed, for the men's feet in cold weather. That must have been a nice little job in past times; for he had found no less than fifty years' sup- ply of those articles in stock. (Laughter,) Yet the right hon. gentleman talked of their starving the navy, and said they had no cloth, no clothing for the marines. Good gracious! (Laughter.) Of blue cloth, Xo. 2, they had seven years' supply; of jackets, twelve years' supply they had supplies of comforters for three and a half years, of striped shirting for five years, and 1 of tuweling for seven years. (Laughter.) The Pall Mall Gazette describes some of the curious customs of the Japanese, and it will be seen that with that uncivilized race" the question of education is solved The law of the country insists that each child shall be daily exposed to the air without clothes, and with its head shaved, and in spite of both rain and sun. During infancy the child's ordinary playmates are a fat, short-legged dog, and fatter tail- less cat. Instruction is never forced upon either parents or children; it is supposed to recommend itself naturally by its own intrinsic merits; and every man and woman throughout the empire is able to read, write, and cipher. The thirtieth day after birth every citizen receives his tirst name; on attaining his majority he takes a second, a third on his marriage, a fourth on being invested with any public function, which he changes upon attaining each higher grade, and so on to the name given to him after his death. The last is engraved on his tomb, and he is by it known to all succeeding generations. The following report of a romantic trial for murder in England appeared in the Journal de Paris last week :— A very sad drama has just received its denouement before the London tribunals. A portrait painter, named George Ham- mard, was accused of the premeditated murder of a tumbler named George Baldwin. He did not deny the charge, but nar- rated in the following terms the circumstances under which he committed the crime" Three years ago my daughter, four years of age-sole souvenir which remained to me of a dear wife whom God took to himself—disappeared. What I have suffered, gentlemen, I cannot describe and you cannot understand. [ spent in advertising and searching for my lost daughter a?l I possessed-furniture, pictures, down to my clothes-all were sold. During three years I have walked on foot all over the three United Kingdoms (.tic) in quest of my daughter, and when, by painting portraits, I found myself in possession of a little money, hardly earned, I returned to London to recom- mence advertising in the journals. At length, on the 15th of April last, a Friday (it was Thursday), I passed through Smithfield Market at the moment that a troop of mountebanks were performing their exercises. A girl was doing a tumble, her legs in the air. A ray from the soul of her mother penetrated doubtless to my soul at the precise moment, for I at once recog- nised my long-lost daughter in that creature Yes! It was my peor child, influenced only by my despair, I threw myself upon the leader of the band, raised him in the air, and let him fall to earth. He was killed But you do not yet know the full ex- tent of my misery. I found my daughter, but, alas she was no longer pure and angelic as in past times. Her manners, her language, were infamons, like those of the people she had been living with. She did not recognize me. Even I (lid not re- cognize her. Now do you understand? The man I killed robbed me of the love and the soul of my daughter, and I—I only took his life." George Hammard was acquitted. Mr George Hammard, his long-lost daughter, and George Baldwin, are all a myth! An amusing incident occurred to break the monotony of the proceedings in the House of Commons the other night. The hour was not late, and Mr Maguire, in a brief speech, moved the appointment of a select committee to inquire into the operation of the Prison Ministers Act, a proposal which evoked some remarks both from Mr Newdegate and from the Home Secretary. When the discussion had ceased, and the" question" had to be put, the Speaker, instead of reading the motion of the member for Cork, read in solemn and sedate tones that which stood next on the notice paper, and which had reference to the produc- tion of returns in some way relating to the river Tweed. Surprise was the first sentiment with which the House appeared to be struck, but it soon gave way to the idea of the ridiculous, and a loud and universal shout of laughter followed. Homer is said to have nodded, and it is sug- gested that Mr Speaker himself is not superior to the soft influences of "nature's sweet restorer, balmy sleep," even when the House is in full session, and members are in the act of delivering their liveliest orations. Mr Heron owes his return for Tipperary to a curious accident. It appears that eighteen persons voted, by mis- take, for "Piokham," instead of for Kickham, and eighteen votes were consequently lost to the Fenian can- didate. But for this mistake Mr Kickham would have been elected by a majority of fourteen. As it is, his sup- porters are sanguine that he may yet obtain the seat, as Mr Heron's return is, on other grounds, to be petitioned against. A remarkable scene took place in a Roman Catholic chapel in Galway on Sunday week. A correspondent of one of the Dublin papers says :—" Our parish priest, Rev. Mr Kemmy, explained in both his chapels Mr Glad- stone's Land Bill, and denounced it with a well-merited reprobation. He asked his congregation if they disap- proved and rejected the Bill to say so, and instantly every man, woman, and child present raised high their hands. He asked them, too, would they ever support the candi- dature of any of their county members who will vote for this Bill, and the crowded audience indignantly cried, 'Never! never! An amusing incident occurred last week in connection with Mr Maccabe's appearance at the Theatre Royal, Bradford. After the conclusion of his entertainment at St. George's Hall, where the audience was so vast that, in spite of the great facilities for exi it was impossible for him to get through the crowd and reach the street for some time, he economized the time by dressing himself in the corduroy trousers, velveteen coat, &c., which form the "make-up" of "Nieodemus Nobbs," the character he Was hastening to appear in at the theatre. The make- up" complete, he issued into the street, where a cab was in waiting to convey him but cabby insisted on taking only Mr Maccabe. It was useless to tell him that the rough-looking costermonger before him was Mr Maccabe. That gentleman hailed another and another cab, but in vain they all refused to carry such a plebeian-looking fare, and Mr Maccabe had to walk to the theatre, where the audience were becoming impatient at the delay. The Waterford Standard gives an amusing account of Mr Bernal Osborne's escape through a skylight from Commins's Hotel, which was attacked by the mob. Ac- companied by a friend the hon. member cautiously crept along the house tops, and at last took refuge in the house of a supporter, where he alighted waist-deep in a water- butt. The two fugitives were then put into a back bedroom. By the time that they had obtained refuge from their perilous flight the lnob had recommenced their attack on the hotel. Finding that if the hotel were broken into and they missing, suspicion might rest upon their escape into the establishment, the assistants began to fear for their own safety. It was first re- solved to put them up on one of the top shelves, but that was abandoned as impracticable, owing to the portly dimensions of the two runaways. A large drawer was next thought of but the same objection was apparent. The only alternative for them was to keep there until the worst was known. Shortly aftei twelve o'clock the mob again dispersed, and the city beginning to assume a tranquil aspect, they were permitted to remain there tmtil about three o'clock on Friday morning. About that houi it was determined that the fugitives should retrace their steps back to the hotel the way they came, and wrapping an overcoat on Mr Osborne, one of the assistants helped them again on tc the roof. They then journeyed back through the skylight intc the hotel. During the time Mr Osborne and his companion Were retiring over the roofs of the houses, his friends who were more timorous retreated into the stables and out-houses of the hotet, where they remained in fearful suspense until quietude Was restored.

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MONTGOMERYSHIRE QUARTER SESSIONS.

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