Skip to main content
Hide Articles List

25 articles on this Page

Advertising

[No title]

I' ABERYSTWYTH.

1 LAMPETER. f

DOLGELtJSY,

Family Notices

I TIDE TABLE FOR ABERYSTWYTH,…

HUNTING APPOINTMENTS.-I

[No title]

FISHING v. MINING.

.MISSIONS IN FOREIGN PARTS.'

TRAFFIC RETURNS.I

,THE IRON TRADE.

SHOCKING ACCIDENT.—TWO MEN…

[No title]

About the World.

Ecclesiastical.I

GIULIA GRISI.

Agricultural.

[No title]

THE APPROACHING EDUCATIONAL…

THE WELSH IRON, TIN-PLATE,…

REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN…

News
Cite
Share

REVIEW OF THE BRITISH CORN TRADE. (From the Mark Lane Express.) Winter in earnest came with the 1st of December, the cold being greater than at any previous period since the commencement of 1869. The growth of all vegetation has therefore come to a standstill, and such weather will severely try the potatoes in store, which this season have little power of resistance. With this decided change has also come an improvement in prices, it being obvious if it should last that little can arrive from the Baltic, or other great sources of supply. This cannot fail to relieve the trade and give farmers a better chance. The average improvement may be taken at Is. per qr., though several places quoted 2s. So that the recovery is only partial, and not enough to pay growers or importers, yet it is something to feel the bottom in crossing a flood, and as our London averages, 45s. 8d., are the lowest of the year, and the number of quarters sold is only 48,960, instead of 64,660 qrs. last year, or 15,700 less than then, there must either be so much less wheat in the country to sell, or so much less disposition to sell it. Taking either alternative, we are drawn to the conclusion that prices eventually must mend. As respects the future crop, we only know it is backward, and much still unsown, but no calamity looms in the distance, and we hope none will; for if it should, we must still more rely upon foreign aid, whether forth- coming or not. As regards the continuance of large im- ports, simply viewing the question in a monetary light, there is no inducement to foreign houses to send on their produce, the values here being relatively lower than any- where else, California perhaps excepted; but even there prices run too close to make the risk encouraging, and no one port alone was ever able to meet the wants of Great Britain; and the quality being white and comparatively scarce at New York, merchants there are competitors with us for its possession, its sale also being more free than in England, where it is excelled by Australian, fine Danzig, and home-grown qualities. It is very remarkable that our recent depression found a response in no foreign port. France seemed most affected, but is now recovering. Belgium had no pressure from heavy imports; Holland was dull, but has not since declined. In several parts of Germany as well as at Danzig prices have rather improved. Hungary, though quiet, has not wavered. It has been much the same at Odessa, while New York quotes higher prices. The sales of English wheat noted last week were 48,960 qrs. at 45s. 6d., against 64,660 qrs. at 51s. in 1868. The imports into the Kingdom for the week ending 27th of November were 1,313,773 cwts. wheat, and 132,473 cwts. flour.

[No title]

[No title]