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OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.

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OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINA- TIONS. PRIZE DISTRIBUTION AT COLWYN BAY. SPLENDID WORK BY JUNIOR SCHOLARS. H.M. INSPECTOR'S CONGRATULATIONS. Tbe annual prize distribution in connection with the Colwyn Bay centre for Oxford Local Examinations took place in the Public Hall, Colwyn Bay, on Friday afternoon. Canon Roberts presided, and was supported bv Mr L. J. Roberts, H.M. Inspector of Schools; Rev. Meredith J. Hughes. Rev. Dr. Cousins, Mr T. G. Osborn, J.P., and tno secre- tary, Mr Win. Jones, N.P. Bank. The hall was well filled with the scholars of the various colleges with their parents and friends- THE CHAIRMAN'S HOPE FOR PEACE. Canon Roberts (chairman) said that they were very delighted to have His Majesty s Inspector jrithfliem that day, for he was surely tie right man in the right place. Mr Roberts was con- .stantly in touch with teachers and schools, and quite entered into their lives. He would like 0 congratulate Mr Roberts upon the fact that there was, as far as he could see, a prospect ot an early settlement of the education question --(bear, hear),-thou,b he would not touch upon any controversial points of the question. 'For many years past it must lave been a very delicate position for H.M.I, when party feeling ;was running so high, and strong in Wales. Oiw iioped that the settlement, if reached, would be as fair and satisfactory as circumstances would pjlow. If it was to be a creditable settlement they would be proud to remember that in the first instance it would be largely due to the Bishop of that diooese (applause). No doubt the boys would enjoy to hear that the report jwiiioh would be placed before them showed that the standard of the work had been the best they had done for years (hear, hear). They woula also be greatly interested in the prize- table and the beautiful prizes. To carry off prizes was a great honour to the boys higher iii a sense than that the little Italian, Dorando, had gained by winning the Marathon race against Hayes (applause). tie hoped their school days would be happy, and that they .would not allow their pleasures to obscure their future The present depended more upon the iboy at school than upon too teachers, the mak- I ing of the future was simply in their own hands iapDlatise). OLD FRIENDS MISSING. Rev Meredith J. Hughes, who was greeted ;with loud applause, said he had been asked to refer to a matter which, although very near to the heart, did not, however, lend harmony to the cheerful and jovial spirit of the meeting. ISince tihey last met in that room two of their best and most esteemed friends had passed away—Mr Deaville, of Rydal Mount, on April 14th, and Mr James Wood, their treasurer, on October 3rd. For nearly twenty years Mr Dea- jville had laboured loyally and well by the side of his principal and comrade at Rydal Mount. !A most gifted and learned man, and a most sincere worker, he had, however, suffered long years of agony, with the most infinite care con- cealing his suffering, lest a shadow should be cast upon the brightness of the cheery young lives around him He had prepared a good number of candidates for those exams, and had rejoiced as one of them at their success. He ;was an excellent master, of splendid character, and a very dear friend. Mr James Wood had be-an a conspicuous personality and a man who had done a great deal for Colwyn Bay. He was very highly esteemed as a magistrate. Others bad spoken of his spirit, devotion, and his good- ness. They knew he had no sympathy with pant, party, or sect. On the contrary he very ^Irequently spoke of such with scorn, His pupils knew of his immeasurable sympathy. He had iMen ever ready to encourage, strengthen, and (support all those upon whom fortune in her fickleness, but seldom smiled. Good men and ifcrue men they should never forget their names. fle would like the boys and girls, knowing that .the spirits of their good friends might not be IVery far away from them, to stand up as a token of their respect, and a mark of their deepest reverence for their names. Mr Hughes' request was at once acceded to. SPLENDID WORK BY THE JUNIORS. The Secretary presented the following report: "On the whole the centre has done very well. tr-he percentage of senior successes among can- didates entered from schools was quite up to the average. 21 out of 26 passing, three obtain- ing honours, and two securing distinction, one jin nathemat;cs, and the other in geography. "aSleven unattached students also sat, but all failed. The performance of the juniors has been both brilliant and bad. Here again all the ;iuri,,ittached candidates failed. Of the 53 entered Irotri schools 33 passed—two taking first class honours, four second class honours, and three third class honours. An unusual number ofdis- ■ tine; ions were secured by this division. Three ibovs obtained distinction in Latin, one boy ob- tained distinction in Spanish and in French, while two boys and three girls were awarded distinctions in religious knowledge. The achievement of the junior3 in this last subject is really magnificent. Over 8300 juniors sat for texamination, and as religious knowledge is prac- tically compulsory it is probable that 8000 papers on this subject would be returned to Oxford. Out of these 8000 only 76 secured distinction, an average of less than one per cent. Five of th"se places were allotted to Colwyn Bay can- Ididates, the centre securing the splendid aver- jage of eight 8.5 per cent- The greatest num- ber of successes numerically fell to London, but jCohvyn Bay, with its five, comes in an easy second (loud applause). The preliminary divi- sion has done weli all round, 5t out of 38 ex- amined gaining certificates, one boy securing third class honours, and two obtaining distinc- tion. Only 88 distinctions were awarded in this division, and as close on 4000 candidates were examined, the performance of our boys in se- curing two of them is highly gratifying (ap- plause). SPEECH BY MR L. J. ROBERTS. Mr L. J Roberts, H.M.I., thanked the com- piittce for the honour conferred upon him in asking him to present the prizes. He congratu- lated the centre upon its numerical and also educational results, With the exception of the iventres at Pantasaph and Howell School, Den- Jjigh, that was the only centre from Rhyl to OBar.gor- He understood that altogether 140 icafcdidatcs had sat, but considerable as this number was ii was only as a drop in the mighty by the side of England, Wales, and the Colonies. In looking at the figures in the re- port. he found that 21,000 sat—3526 preliminaries, B302 juniors, and 9357 seniors. Of these but 15,000 passed, leaving 6000 failures. To obtain a place in these examinations was really a I 'tfifi ;cu.lt achievement. Of these 3526 prelimin- aries cnly seven girls were placed in th2 first iblass. 13 in the second, and 100 in the third.'Of the 8302 juniors, 55 girls were placed in the 'first class, 26 second, and 368 third. Of the 9000 Seniors there were 38 in the first class, S9 second, ¡ and 472 tmrd. lie believed the beys had fared much the same. He thought Colwyn Bay ha.d done remarkably well, and he would like to con- gratulate those who had gained honours. The record was a splendid one, and one of which the boy?, girls, and teachers should be proud. In the caõe of the candidates not attached to any of the schools, most of them were what were called unqualified teachers in elementary schools. They had failed in the examinations arranged for them, and tried these as a last resource. The admirable results in searching and difficult examinations bore sufficient evi- dence to the value of the work done by the private schools which were scattered so freely along the beautiful coast of North Wales. The Schools were free from Government inspection, 60 .hat it was not for him to dwell upon their iad vantages or disadvantages- They could con- gratulate themselves that they were different from the hundreds of schools, where, during every minute of school life they did not know jvvhen the inspecto. was prowling about the pre- nmcs, to put them on the rack by asking awkward questions. Their lot was fortunate (laughter). It was usual on these occasions to give advice to the recipients of prizes. His experience was that success through life was obtained by steady work and persistency, not merely by brilliance. To those who had not Jalned a priz that day ho would say there was I Jtio re-ed to be discouraged. It was the custom ito recommend diligence, but the success that had been achieved was sufficient to show that they bad not been wanting in that respect. THE NEED FOR PLAY. Finally, it wa3 invaluable to have exercise to cultivate a sound mind and body. During these days they had also to think of the girl. If they fiid not she grew up and was apt to be forgot- ten. In a girl's career there had been a revolu- tion in physical exercise during the last few years owing to the development of hockey. In secondary an I elementary schools the time given to games and exercises was too little, wihilsfc ifc jfras said that in private school it was too much, fie for one thought it was easier and better to tor on the side of having too much than too little in this xcspect (applavse). lie emphasised what had been said at a previous prize distribu- tion with reference to the boys and girls being interested in the country in which they lived- Nothing ooul, bj more absurd than that they I could give the exact height and length of moun- tains in remote countries, willie they were at the same time totally ignorant of the magnifi- cent range of mountains which could be seen from the school doors (hear, hear). lie wonder- ed how many of them knew anything about the mountains Tryfan and Moel Siabod; yet they were recognised as being amongst the finest mountains in the British Isles. In conclusion, he would like to call attention to the great national festival, which was to take place in Colwyn Bay in 1910. The National Eisteddfod was a festival with which no other country in the world had ajiything to compare (applause). He suggested that the boys and girls should procure a programme, and endeavour to secure one of the handsome prizes which were offered. It was done by a few schools, notably Howell School, Denbigh, where prizes were won year after year. The National Eisteddfod had rcn dsred incalculable service to Wales, and there waa hardly a Welshman living who did not owe something to it. Mr Lloyd George attributed his success to it. The Eisteddfod had been de- scribed as the poor man's university. Many a iloor man had gained first ciass honours for literary works, whilst the list also included the names of dozens of graduates who had gamed prizes. The popular novelist, Allen Raine, re- ceived her first stimulus to write stones from a prize offered at Bangor a few years ago. The adjudicator waa the late Mr W. Darlington, and it was said that both the adjudicator and Allen Raine had died during the present year. If they had a taste for archeology or history splendid prize;; were offered- A prize was offered at London of £ 35 for the best hisfory of the three Denbighshire brothers called Myddle- ton. At Colwyn Bay, Sir Herbert Roberts offered JE50 for the best history of Denbigh shire. There was also sufficient scope offered in the musical section. The speaker closed with the number of schoolboy "howlers," which he had come across from time to time, including the following: — "Oliver Cromwell calls September 3rd his lucky day. He died on September 3rd, still he called it his lucky day." Magna Charta was a very good woman to the poor. Her photograph is in the stained glass windows of the Church of Scotland." "The Black Prince died from injuries re- ceived by his horse." "Edward III. was the daughter of Arabella." Mr Roberts then proceeded to distribute the prizes to THE SUCCESSFUL CANDIDATES. Boys-Seniors-Third Honours: D. D. Bean, Rydal Mount, Colwyn Bay (24th in England in mathematics); D. Witty, Rydal Mount (bracketed A I'N England in geography). Passed: A. Cole, Rydal Mount, Colwyn Bay-, A. Higson Smith, do. W. O. Lancaster, do.; J. Leale, do. J. D. Oliver, do.; F. G. WTood, do.; W. E. Buckley, County School, Rhyl. Juniors—First Honours: A. E. W. Dean, Rydal Mount, and PP°'d, do. (12th in religious knowledge and distinction in Latin). Second Honours: A. E. Be-stall, Rydal Mount; P. J. M. Larrauage, Dinglewood, Colwyn Bay (first in Spanisli for JUigiana. second year in succession, and 12th in French); G. A. Potts, Rydal Mount. Third Honours: F. S. Rig-gall, Rydal Mount (distinction in Latin); E. A. Wilson, do. Passed: R. Barlow, Rydal Mount; D. jv5. Bunting, do.; J. T," J do.; T. K. Greeii*i. Tanybryn, Llandudno; D. F. Hocken, Rydal G Jamieson, Drngle^vood; W. A. Macfadyan, Rydal Mount; H. C. Oliver, do.; E. W. H. Owen, do.; G. II. Porter, do H. Riggall, do.; S. Stones, J 5' r s->'kej. do-; j- L. Pierce, Dingle- wood; R L. Redfern, Rvdal Mount. Pre- liminary—Third Honours: H. Moores, Dingle- wood (bracketed fifth in French). Passed: A. ti* n Merton House, Penmaenxnawr; J. D. Lartmell, Arvon House, Colwyn Bay A. F. Cross, do. H. R. Drummond Fraser, Tanybryn, Llandudno; A. T. S. Holt, Merton House; T. D. Kendrick, Tanybryn; G. W. Mason, Merton House; H. Masters, Dinglewood; G. G. Roberts, Eiwy Hall, lvhyl (bracketed fourth in English history); R. G. L. Roberts, Tanybryn; D. J. Simon, do.; T. E. Storrs, Dinglewood; R. P Le P. I< rench, Tanybryn; C. F. Turner, Rydal Mount; E. M Wajmvright, Tanybrvn; W. Waths Arvon House; J. E. Watson, Dingle- vvood; P. M. Drummond Fraser, Tanvbryn; P U Lancaster, Rydal Mount; C. J. Penlington, -in, i, ArvOD House; G. S Pennington, do.; B. Ro- Herts, do.; A. C. Storrs, Dinglewood; S. Sykes, 00. Girls —Higher Local: Miss M. E. Lambe, St. Mary's Convent, Ruyl, second class in eduoa- 1 t^i'd class mathematics. Miss Lambe has now obtained an honours certificate. Miss K. Langford Jones, St. Winifred's, Bang'ox(first class English Literature); Miss J. Hayes, Miss C. M. Jones, and Miss K. L. MacGeagh, St. Wini- fr«< -S Bangor (second class Literature); Miss C. M. Jones also passed in arithmetic. Seniors— Third Class Honours: W. Sapcote, Arcville Col- lege, Rhyl. PMs-Division I. H. A. Bell, S M. Morton, Plas Tirion, Colwvn Bay; N. E. Goodwin, M. A. Roberts, Elwy Hall, Rhyl; E M. E. MarJey, H. M. Sandys, Winifred's, Bangor; M. Bayliss, W. E. Trigger, County School, Rhyl; J. Roddick, Wilton House, Colwyn Bay; E. Stokes, St. Marv's Convent, RhyI. Division II.: B. Leech, St. Mary's Convent, Rhvl. Juniors-First in Second Class Honours W. E. Crockford, Elwy Hall, Rhyl (distinguished in religious knowledge, obtains gold 6 medal offered by Rev. Meredith J. Hughes). Third Class Honours A Lambe, St. Mary's Convent, i • i J I.: L. Furcell (distin- guished in religious knowledge), and M. O'Ryan both of St. Mary's Convent; M. D. Riley (dis- tinguished in religious knowledge), and M. Ro- bert. St. Winifred's, C. M. Grove. Elwy Hall, Rhyl. Pass-Division II.: N. Hohl, D. HICK man, L. Isaac, St. Mary's Convent, Hhyl; O. M. D. Goes, St. Winifred's, Bangor. Pre- liminaries—Pass: Division I., J. C. Greig, M. Lord, PIas Tirion, Colwyn Bay; A. E. C. Tdfer, E. G. Williams, Hibernia School, Holyhead F. Booth, Wilton House; E. Leech, St. Marv's Col- lc-e: A. G. Burrows, Plas Tudno, Llandudno. Division IL H. Birmingham, K. Keatinge, St. Mary 3 Convent, Rhyl. Mr T. G. Osborn, who moved a vote of 1L:n;:s to the chairman, Mr Roberts, the secretary, ind others, expressed his saticfaction i"hat'"the dividing line" in education had been gjt cner. He would like to associate himself with the words of the Rev. M. J. Hughes, and at the same time congratulate him upon his preferment (applause). His leaving would be a !o;s to Colwyn Bay, but they must try and rejoice in his gam. He thanked Mr Hughes for the words he had spoken about their two departed friends. Mr Deaville was one of his oldest" friends. He had been the pleasantest of eomoau ons, the most genial and loyal of friends, and rr ost- earn'st and painstaking of masters. Mr Wood v. as the first to meet him when he came to Conn-n Bay, having just opened his OTn schoo! j- de- mises. He was an extraordinary man. vho had

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OXFORD LOCAL EXAMINATIONS.